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I have been a subscriber of Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine for over 10 years, on and off. Just got my May issue and they wrote a story about HDTV. The article indicates that maybe now is the time to consider it.


Sounds reasonable, so far. But here are some quotes from the article:


"Although the major networks haven't made a wholesale switch to HDTV signals, CBS and NBC broadcast the bulk of their prime-time lineups in HDTV...most of the other networks have relatively little to offer HDTV viewers"


"Anyone can get DTV with DirecTV, the country's biggest satellite-television provider and the only one now offering digital...the monthly service fee will be $20 to $40 more than the roughly $40 fee for basic service"


"The satellite feed now includes all network HDTV shows, plus those on HBO, Showtime and HDNet"


"HDNet broadcasts what's left over after the major networks have picked over the best sporting events, along with documentaries and travel programs, and a handful of movies and sitcoms" (I wonder what Mark Cuban would think of that statement!)


"Buy a digital TV that transmits the 1080i format" (Italics mine)


There are other statements that I suspect aren't totally true, I just picked out some interesting ones.


I am very surprised that a publication as respected as Kiplinger's would publish such inaccuracies.
 

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I am very surprised that a publication as respected as Kiplinger's would publish such inaccuracies.
Kind of makes you wonder if all their reporting is this good.
 

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I sent the following to Kiplinger (and thanks for allowing me to plagiarize some of the ideas from this thread!)


Hi:

I just read your HDTV article and was astonished at how much misinformation you could pack into just a few paragraphs.


I won't even try to note every one of them, but here are a coupe of the most egregious errors::


"Although the major networks haven't made a wholesale switch to HDTV signals, CBS and NBC broadcast the bulk of their prime-time lineups in HDTV, including popular shows such as Frasier, CSI and The Tonight Show With Jay Leno. A year ago the two networks offered only a few sports programs and an occasional special in the HDTV feed. HBO broadcasts The Sopranos and many of its top movies in HDTV, but most of the other networks have relatively little to offer HDTV viewers."


Actually ALL of the CBS and ABC scripted show are broadcast in HD.

NBC has a number of programs (the Law and Orders, Ed, ER and others, along with Leno). And NBC has the West Wing -- and a number of new programs) in the Fall and Conan O'Brien switching to HD soon (Letterman will be in HD in September). It sure sounds like a wholesale switch has already been made to me. And while Fox is steadfastly against HD, it does broadcast many of it's programs (along with NASCAR races and NFL games starting this fall) in a widescreen format roughly equivalent to DVD quality. Both UPN and the WB have some HD offerings, and pledge to add many more in the fall.


"The satellite feed now includes all network HDTV shows, plus those on HBO, Showtime and HDNet."


Actually, DirecTV does NOT provide access to ANY network HDTV shows. Dish Network does provide CBS HD for those who live in areas served by CBS Owned and Operated Stations.


There are numerous other errors, large and small, in the article.


I would humbly suggest you don't assign Mr. Martinez to do stock picks.
 

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Quote:
I just read your HDTV article and was astonished at how much misinformation you could pack into just a few paragraphs.
Just a tip- Not a good idea to be condescending towards someone you're offering help to- at least not at the beginning of a message anyways. I'd tend to ignore everything afterwards.:D
 

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You could be right, Dave. I guess it depends on who reads it.


As one who has spent four decades in journalism, I have always appreciated a punchy lead. And having had to review numerous complaints over the years, I always found my curiosity piqued by someone who challenged facts I had presented.


And anyhow, I don't see the opening paragraph as condescending at all. Perhaps more upset, angry, or disappointed.


(But the LAST paragraph: THAT'S condescending!)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by gindie
I am very surprised that a publication as respected as Kiplinger's would publish such inaccuracies.
Great! And I used their software for doing my taxes! Guess I'll see you all in five-to-ten...
 

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fredfa- thanks for pointing that out. I took a journalism course in and we were taught to ask the "pointed" questions towards the end of the interview- you know, make them your friend, then piss them off.:D
 

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Kipp:

No answer yet.

(Maybe I WAS too condescending!)

Fred
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by DaveFi
Just a tip- Not a good idea to be condescending towards someone you're offering help to- at least not at the beginning of a message anyways. I'd tend to ignore everything afterwards.:D
From reading this, it appears they are pretty much in the IGNORANCE mode already.


I work for a public agency that gets a lot of local press, and I'm continually amazed at how inaccurate nearly every story is covering my workplace. Reporters for the most part have very little knowledge of the subject they are covering, and tend to write what they feel is most interesting...without regard to accuracy.


Of course, the writer could have received his information by spending an hour at Circuit City or Best Buy.


R8der
 

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In my experience any magazine / journal which prints anything outside their own area of expertise will be highly inaccurate ... unless done by an external expert, ofcourse.
 

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I always thought Kipllinger was a third rate publication with superficial articles even having to do with finance. Moreover, they should be able to get High Def right as this is an important area for investment. The WSJ and Business Week have many excellent articles outside their own area of expertise.
 
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