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Discussion Starter #1
I have a brand specific question but people may be able to answer regardless if they have direct experience with this brand. I'm looking at potentially using Klipsch in-wall speakers for a new HT build. I've never had in-walls before but I'm interested in keeping open floor space at clean looks and am willing to give up some on performance. Klipsch offers what they categorize as both in-wall and in-ceiling speakers. The in-wall speakers look like the front of a typical Klipsch bookshelf speaker but it appears the entire horn part has a few degrees of tilt so you can aim them a bit. The in-ceiling speakers look more like a car audio coaxial speaker with an aim-able tweeter. I'm wondering if there would be an advantage to using the in-wall speakers in ceiling for rear surrounds or if I should stick with the in-ceiling speakers. The reason it occurs to me to ask is that the in-ceiling designated speakers don't incorporate a horn on the tweeter.

Thoughts?
 

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I have a brand specific question but people may be able to answer regardless if they have direct experience with this brand. I'm looking at potentially using Klipsch in-wall speakers for a new HT build. I've never had in-walls before but I'm interested in keeping open floor space at clean looks and am willing to give up some on performance. Klipsch offers what they categorize as both in-wall and in-ceiling speakers. The in-wall speakers look like the front of a typical Klipsch bookshelf speaker but it appears the entire horn part has a few degrees of tilt so you can aim them a bit. The in-ceiling speakers look more like a car audio coaxial speaker with an aim-able tweeter. I'm wondering if there would be an advantage to using the in-wall speakers in ceiling for rear surrounds or if I should stick with the in-ceiling speakers. The reason it occurs to me to ask is that the in-ceiling designated speakers don't incorporate a horn on the tweeter.

Thoughts?

I don't have the in wall or in ceiling Klipsch speakers, but I have a set up with the Klipsch RB-61IIs and RC-42II for the fronts and a pair of Boston acoustic in ceiling speakers for the rears. I had considered the same questions and went with the ceiling instead of the in walls because I was concerned that the in walls would be too directional. So far I have been please with the results. I know this doesn't address your question directly, but hopefully it helps.
 

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Triad

I had an older setup that the original homeowner put in, that was mostly M&K speakers. The front had a left and right that were on stands, the center above the monitor, and two "effect" speakers up on the front wall. These were small Yamahas on Omni mounts tilted and directed toward the listener. On the back wall (behind) we had three M&K SS-150 THX tripoles - with one of them being a single rear speaker. That was the way this Yamaha receiver was set up, and the THX setup twelve years ago. The SS-150's on the back wall sounded incredible, with the three spreakers plus tweeter in each box. But according to my wife and her decorator, looked like black boxes on the wall. As the speakers were about 12 ft above the floor (open concept and wall not extended below that), the new speakers needed to be fired at about a 45 degree angle. We replaced the back L-R with Triad in-ceiling speakers that we installed in the walls. Behind the wall area is an attic space so we had unlimited depth - which is usually the difference between the ceiling speakers and the wall speakers. Sound is directed well. The Triads each have two speakers and a tweeter. They sound pretty good, but look a LOT better because they are painted grill speakers. The challenge is that they are a bit high so some of the sound goes over the back two seating positions. In the front, we replaced the effect speakers with similar Triads. They sound very good as they are pointed almost directly at the seating area.

All of the other speakers we looked at could not be directed 45 deg, but only around 30 deg. That was not going to work.
 

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I think the problem you are having is that you've installed Triad IC LCRs in the walls. They are designed to go in the ceiling so there's a good chance the angle is off. Any chance you can move them to the ceiling? You will only need 8 inches of clearance above the ceiling.
 

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I have a brand specific question but people may be able to answer regardless if they have direct experience with this brand. I'm looking at potentially using Klipsch in-wall speakers for a new HT build. I've never had in-walls before but I'm interested in keeping open floor space at clean looks and am willing to give up some on performance. Klipsch offers what they categorize as both in-wall and in-ceiling speakers. The in-wall speakers look like the front of a typical Klipsch bookshelf speaker but it appears the entire horn part has a few degrees of tilt so you can aim them a bit. The in-ceiling speakers look more like a car audio coaxial speaker with an aim-able tweeter. I'm wondering if there would be an advantage to using the in-wall speakers in ceiling for rear surrounds or if I should stick with the in-ceiling speakers. The reason it occurs to me to ask is that the in-ceiling designated speakers don't incorporate a horn on the tweeter.

Thoughts?
Did you end up getting Klipsch in-walls and in-ceiling speakers? Thoughts on them?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No. This thread was research for a new room in a new home. We ended up not moving and to satisfy the itch, I sold all my Klipsch speakers and built out a GET Triton One based home theater. All stand alone (no in-wall/ceiling).
 

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Surround (not Atmos) speakers have always been mounted on the side wall, not ceiling, be it a regular surround speaker or in wall. Surrounds create ambience from the sides of the room.

The Klipsch designed for side mounting which you mentioned will give you better sound mounted on the wall than on the ceiling. It will also sound much better than a traditional ceiling speaker.Surround sound should come from the sides of your listening room; not the ceiling. That is how they were designed to be used when created.

If you were doing Atmos, that would be ceiling.
 
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