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I recently purchased a Pioneer KRP-500M and am trying to figure out the best settings for both my PS3 and my HDMI 360. I know on the KRP I can set the HDMI Input Signal Type, and there are also several settings for each console I can set. It seems as though the biggest decision is whether to have it set at 0-255 or 16-235. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I personally keep it at 16-235 for everything, games included. I'm not sure that there is a better alternative short of adjusting it each time you swap between a game and a movie. If the 500M could auto-adjust it wouldn't be an issue, but there's a software bug that prevents this from happening as it should.
 

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Hey guys,


I want to try and understand a few things with D-Nice's recommended 500m/PS3 settings.


1.) D-Nice mentions changing the BD/DVD video output to RGB. Now from what I understand, media is encoded in the digital domain, YCbCr, correct? The signal then feeds to the 500m where the 500m processes it and changes it to RGB signal format to display. So is it right to think that D-Nice is just moving the video processing step from the 500m to the PS3 so that the PS3 sends a nice RGB signal through HDMI?


But what was the problem with making the PS3 output YCbCr and have the 500M process the video? That's the bug right? But I thought the bug had to only do with RGB signals, not YCbCr signals. When the 500M receives YCbCr signals, it's still going to be processed right?


2) D-Nice also mentions changing the RGB to "Limited", which makes the signal output RGB (16-235). I think this has to do with the bug in the 500m HDMI input detection right?


3) He also mentions turning superwhite "On". From my understanding, this is to include the BTB (blacker than blacks, 0-15) and WTW (whiter than whites, 236-255) in the RGB signals as well right?


4) The last thing is to configure the 500m. He mentions changing the input detection from "Auto" to "RGB(16-235)". This is where I'm confused, or maybe I have one of the previous steps' understanding wrong. The signal coming in is 16-235 due to the limited settings, but what happens to the WTW and BTB signals?


TIA for any help guys. Thought I'd try to understand the basics before I go dive in and set the PS3. I know there's a lot of controversy around settings but a good understanding helps me choose the best method, I think.


Hopefully some people will benefit from this thread/post. Thanks guys!
 

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I actually ended up doing something quite different. I left the PS3 Blu-Ray settings at the default and they output YCbCr limited and my KRP-600M seems to handle it just fine with the input set to Auto; but what I did change were the PS3 Display settings to RGB Full.


Best I can tell, the bug in the Pioneer is that it detects RGB limited as RGB full, so what's the most typical RGB source for the PS3? Well, from what I see it includes the XMB, games, and RGB encoded videos played by the media server. By telling the PS3 to output these as Full it seems to preserve the blacks.


Is this breaking something else? I don't know.


Some folks are dealing with cable boxes that only output RGB limited, and dealing with a cable box and the PS3 both going in to an AVR and then out to the TV would require switching the PS3 to RGB limited and locking the KRP to RGB limited.
 

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I have a 500m, PS3 and HDMI 360. Here is what I use:


Kuro

Auto


PS3

Output: YCC or Auto

RGB: Full

Super Whites: On


Xbox

Output: RGB or Auto

Color Space: Expanded


I used a calibration disk with all of the sources to make sure there is no black level issues.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbrady3324 /forum/post/17354841


I have a 500m, PS3 and HDMI 360. Here is what I use:


Kuro

Auto


PS3

Output: YCC or Auto

RGB: Full

Super Whites: On

Interesting. I think we arrived at basically the same settings.


This isn't what D-Nice has been recommending, though, but I wonder if that's because he might be using the AVSHD disc to help in calibration? I played the Mp4 files back through my PS3 and noticed they were RGB limited, but I didn't bother to burn them to a disc and see what they might do.
 

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My settings are similar with the PS3 and Xbox 360 connected to a 765 Yamaha receiver. I haven't had any issues, however, I am curious of what are the preferred tv settings when playing games. Should I just stick with D-Nice's settings for games as well? I followed everything to the T with breaking in, and watching movies on these settings are amazing, but I can't say the same when i play games. Are there any suggestions? Thank you in advance.
 

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Try games with the RGB Full setting on the PS3 and either the same or Auto on the KRP and see what you think.


Feel free to try the other settings and see if it looks the same as D-Nice's suggested settings.


If you have a calibration DVD or BluRay you might check to see if the white or black levels change at all.
 

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From what I understand, games are coded depending on the developer. The RGB range can differ from game to game.


I'm thinking of trying two things:


1) PS3: RGB: Limited

Kuro: RGB(16-235)


2) PS3: RGB: Full

Kuro: Auto or RGB(0-255)?


Not sure if 2 works but i know 1 is D-Nice's setting.
 

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Games are generating 0-255 levels to a hardware, which then converts it to whatever you have set (Full/Limited etc). But you can bet they test against the standard/average users display, which we can assume is limited level since its the HDTV rec standard. So neither is probably that much better.


I think the main thing is just to have your display and the ps3 (or whatever device) match. Otherwise you will be seeing incorrect/mismatched levels.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by boarder /forum/post/17356869


I think the main thing is just to have your display and the ps3 (or whatever device) match. Otherwise you will be seeing incorrect/mismatched levels.

That's the trick ... the thing is with the KRP's Auto mode, it can sync to YCbCr limited, but it won't sync to RGB limited. So if you tell the PS3 to output RGB limited and the KRP to accept only RGB limited, you end up with lighter blacks when you feed it a game (such as Ratchet & Clank).


And just to be clear, there are actually 3 settings of note on the PS3:

Quote:
Video Settings


This section of the XrossMediaBar is where you'll find all of the necessary settings for video content, DVD, Blu-ray, or otherwise. You can find the "Video Settings" sub-category just below "System Update" and "Game Settings." From within this menu there are several settings categories that affect Blu-ray performance, check out our recommended settings below:




"BD Internet Connection"


Online integration is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of Blu-ray technology. It enables users to get all of the latest firmware updates for their player, which ensures that playback performance is as seamless as possible. The PlayStation 3 is unique in that it utilizes WiFi technology, whereas most standalone Blu-ray solutions require an Ethernet cable connection. The WiFi of the PlayStation allows you to get updates and content for your player as soon as they become available, as such, it is important that your PS3's Blu-ray internet access is always turned on. Of the two options provided for the "BD Internet Connection," select "Allow." This tells your player to establish an internet connection every time a Blu-ray disc is being played.


Recommended Setting: "Allow"




"BD/DVD Cinema Conversion"

This option pertains primarily to how your PS3 displays DVD content recorded in interlace format. This issue only rarely applies to Blu-ray content, primarily supplemental content with lesser encodings or homemade Blu-ray discs. To ensure that you get the best possible viewing experience, even with standard-definition supplemental content, leave this selected to "Automatic," which enables your player to automatically detect and match the best conversion method for the source material.


Recommended Setting: "Automatic"




"BD/DVD Upscaler"

Like the "Cinema Conversion" category, this setting is only applicable to Blu-ray content that is encoded in standard definition (non-HD extras). There are a number of options given to users: "Double Scale," "Normal," "Full Screen," and "Off." The "Double Scale" option doubles the resolutions of the source video, which sounds more beneficial than it really is. Double scaling your video can, in some cases, give you a softer image than what you started with. "Full Screen" is also an undesirable choice because it scales your image in a way that stretches it beyond its natural dimensions. We recommend going with "Normal," which scales your image to the maximum proportional resolution supported by your TV.


Recommended Setting: "Normal"



"BD/DVD Video Output Format (HDMI)"


This setting allows you to specify the color space of the video output from your PS3, either RGB or Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr. Typically, video game content is encoded in sRGB and video is broken down into Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr. The PlayStation 3 can automatically detect which color mode is best for the source video, but some users have noted problems with the auto detection, such as discoloration. Additionally, RGB and Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr output can be affected by the type of display you are using, whether it be a PC monitor or TV. For those using a PC monitor we recommend "RGB," while HDTV owners should stick to "Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr" for Blu-ray content.


Recommended Setting: "RGB" for PC monitors, "Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr" for TVs.


Jon's Setting: "Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr"


"BD 1080p 24 Hz Output (HDMI)"

This setting pertains to how your PlayStation 3 outputs video refresh rate for Blu-ray content. For the most fluid, cleanest picture, Blu-ray delivers video at their native 24 frames-per-second, which eliminates common playback issues at higher framerates, such as 60 Hz and 50 Hz. Most current-generation TVs support 24 Hz playback, but if you are unsure whether or not your display is capable of displaying at the native framerate, select "Automatic." This allows your PlayStation 3 to automatically detect the framerate and display rate of your setup.


Recommended Setting: "Automatic"




"BD/DVD Dynamic Range Control"




One problem with high-end digital audio outputs is that they are impractical for low-volume usage. If you are trying to watch a film and your volume isn't cranked, hearing the film's dialogue can be incredibly difficult; the words get lost in the soundtrack and effects. To prevent this, Sony incorporated an automated feature that would boost dialogue, however, we've noticed that this feature can increase dialogue beyond favorable levels at times. To ensure that you get pristine audio performance, we recommend keeping this feature set to "Off."


Recommended Setting: "Off"




"BD/DVD Audio Output Format (HDMI)"

This setting, for whatever reason, is still filed under "Video Settings" on the XMB menu, despite the fact that it has nothing to do with video performance. In any case, this option allows users to specify how audio signals are delivered to their audio system when connected via HDMI. For this option, you want to select "Linear PCM," as it is capable of delivering the most diverse audio formats. Linear PCM enables the PS3 to deliver DolbyTrue HD, whereas bitstream can only output TrueHD signals in a DTS encoding.


Recommended Setting: "Linear PCM"




"BD/DVD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital)"

While Linear PCM is the better choice for use with HDMI connections, Bitstream codecs are better suited for optical cable connections with the PS3. Linear PCM codecs can only be delivered as stereo signals by the PlayStation 3. The better option of the two is Bitstream for optical connections, as it can deliver Dolby Digital Plus, DTS surround, and Dolby Digital. Unfortunately, optical connections in either case cannot deliver Dolby TrueHD.


Recommended Setting: "Bitstream"



Display Settings


You can find "Display Settings" just below "Printer Settings" toward the bottom of the main "Settings" queue. This area of settings determines the overall video output settings for your PlayStation 3. Most of the settings in this subsection are largely subjective. Output resolutions will vary with each television, and user-preference determines the screensaver. The two main settings we need to view and tweak are "RGB Full Range (HDMI)" and "Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr Super-White (HDMI)."



RGB Full Range (HDMI)


This setting pertains to how wide the RGB color output of your PlayStation 3 is. There are two options within this setting "Limited" or "Full." "Limited" delivers a more subdued, albeit more naturalistic, color range, while "Full" produces both brighter and richer tones on both ends of the spectrum. As a result of the "Full" spectrum, many intermediate shades get lost in the mix. On the other hand, some users may find that "Full" is better for their particular TV, however, we found that in most cases "Limited" produced the best results.


Recommended Setting: "Limited"

Jon's Setting: "Full"



Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr Super-White (HDMI)


The "Super-White" feature on the PS3 is designed to present deeper black levels and brighter whites during video playback with supported TVs. This feature only works with displays that accept Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr signals via HDMI. If you are unsure about whether or not your display accepts Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr via HDMI, don't fret! You can leave this feature set to "On" in any case. If your TV supports it, then you get the full benefit. If not, it has no negative impact on your picture.


Recommended Setting: "On"

Jon's Setting: "On"


Sound Settings


The final subsection in our guide is the "Sound Settings" section. You can find the "Sound Settings" just below "Display Settings" on the XMB menu. This, as you may have guessed, is where you can configure your system's audio output.




Audio Output Settings This section is fairly automated, simply select the method by which you have your PS3 connected to your sound system and select "Automatic." This allows the system to automatically detect what settings are supported by your audio system and enables them. Review the codecs, making sure none are left out, and save.

I've included the settings that I came up with under the appropriate sections to show context, but basically we have the BD/DVD Video Output Format, the RGB Full Range, and the Super White settings to nail.
 
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