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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.

I'm new to this forum and to TVs (HD or not) but have just bought a nice set with an Internet Video Link (Sony DMX-NV1).


I have a working WiFi home network for our PCs, connected to a fiber optics network. My incoming converter box (fiber to Ethernet) came with only one Ethernet connection, and for the Video Link, I need to have a second outlet somewhere else in the house. It is already there and wired but needs to be connected to fiber. My provider said I just have to install a router in the garage, next to the fiber converter box, and connect both Ethernet outlets to this router.


That's were my problem starts: I have an older router (non-WiFi, which is perfect for my needs) that still works.


Can I just plug it in correctly and it will all work as needed, or do I have to configure that new router like I had to configure the existing WiFi router?


If so, how can I do that (as before with a PC?), and will the existing WiFi router for PC still work as it is configured now? I dread this work and have always run into problems (but succeeded in the end).


I look forward to getting your expert advice with detailed instructions (I'm not a programmer or systems admin, just a self-taught PC user). Thank you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moped /forum/post/15539788


Hi.

I'm new to this forum and to TVs (HD or not) but have just bought a nice set with an Internet Video Link (Sony DMX-NV1).


I have a working WiFi home network for our PCs, connected to a fiber optics network. My incoming converter box (fiber to Ethernet) came with only one Ethernet connection, and for the Video Link, I need to have a second outlet somewhere else in the house. It is already there and wired but needs to be connected to fiber. My provider said I just have to install a router in the garage, next to the fiber converter box, and connect both Ethernet outlets to this router.


That's were my problem starts: I have an older router (non-WiFi, which is perfect for my needs) that still works.


Can I just plug it in correctly and it will all work as needed, or do I have to configure that new router like I had to configure the existing WiFi router?


If so, how can I do that (as before with a PC?), and will the existing WiFi router for PC still work as it is configured now? I dread this work and have always run into problems (but succeeded in the end).


I look forward to getting your expert advice with detailed instructions (I'm not a programmer or systems admin, just a self-taught PC user). Thank you.


OK, so you have a wireless router connected to your cable (FiOS?) mode but it only has one ethernet jack. You have another cable modem router, but it's not wireless. Is that about right?


What's connected to the Wireless router now?
 

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I would not use the old router. It is possible to set it up as a dumb switch, but it sounds like you don't want to delve too deeply into that arena. Your best bet is to just buy a cheap 8 port switch (about $30). That will allow you to connect everything. I am surprised that your existing WiFi router doesn't have additional ethernet ports. Are you sure it is a router and not a wireless access point for just the PC?


A typical installation is: Fiber Converter's WAN ethernet jack connected to WAN port on WiFi Router. WiFi 1, 2, 3, or 4 Ethernet port connected to Switch giving you 8 ports. I'm thinking that maybe your WiFi is only an access point if it only has one port. If that's the case, you don't have a router at all and you could use your old router.


Perhaps it is best if you post a diagram of your setup, or at least the model #'s of your existing 'router' and your old router.
 

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Lots of easy ways to do this.


A few more details would be helpful.


You said the ethernet cable for the video feed is wired, but where does the cable run from/to? Garage, where the fiber terminates - the location of the single ethernet port on the fiber-to-ethernet converter? So in that location you have 2 ethernet cables there (cable that runs to the PC and cable that runs to the TV), but only one female port on the converter?


Does the new video ethernet cable need to 'arise' from your home network, or can the feed arise from the fiber directly?


If it doesn't need to connect to your home network, a simple 'switch' in the garage (someone said $30 for a multiport switch, I think you can buy it cheaper) should split the incoming ethernet simply.


Buy the switch locally, so you can return it if it doesn't work.


Post your progress, plz.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses so far. I'll give some more detail:


Fiber comes into garage. Fiber modem is built-in there but only has one ethernet female out.


Wired are two CAT-5 cables from garage to their respective outlets, E1 and E2.


E1 is now plugged into the modem and goes to my office, feeding the wireless router, located in the office. It is a full router (DLink DI-824VUP), with four LAN ports, but it is too far away from the TV and I don't want to run an open CAT-5 through the hallway and half the house.


E2 is going to the TV in the family room, but not yet connected to the fiber modem.


The other wired router I have is a DLink DI-704P.


Can I mess up my current wireless network if I just, for testing, install it in the garage and see if it all works, without further setting-up adjustments?


I agree, if a $30 switch would do the trick, I'd rather go that way, but the Fiber installer said I'd need a router.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moped /forum/post/15542221


Thanks for the responses so far. I'll give some more detail:


Fiber comes into garage. Fiber modem is built-in there but only has one ethernet female out.


Wired are two CAT-5 cables from garage to their respective outlets, E1 and E2.


E1 is now plugged into the modem and goes to my office, feeding the wireless router, located in the office. It is a full router (DLink DI-824VUP), with four LAN ports, but it is too far away from the TV and I don't want to run an open CAT-5 through the hallway and half the house.


E2 is going to the TV in the family room, but not yet connected to the fiber modem.


The other wired router I have is a DLink DI-704P.


Can I mess up my current wireless network if I just, for testing, install it in the garage and see if it all works, without further setting-up adjustments?


I agree, if a $30 switch would do the trick, I'd rather go that way, but the Fiber installer said I'd need a router.

Having two routers on a single network is tricky as you can't have them both leasing/managing IP addresses. You need to 'dumb' down one.


Here's what I'd do. Move the wireless router in your office to the modem. Connect the WAN port on the fiber converter to the WAN port on the router. Connect E1 to your office PC on one of the wired ports. Connect E2 to your TV to the other. Your 'installer' didn't fully understand your setup if he was recommending another router. Probably didn't realize you already had one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Phew! Back online. robertmee, please look for a question at the bottom.


Okay, I connected the old router.

The Video Link worked like a charm. Got it all set up and can see my local weather and news, which is what I mostly wanted.


The wireless router didn't work anymore, though. A direct connection to E2 worked, but not through the router. I will see if the old router needs a firmware update and then try again. If it still won't work, I'll replace the wireless router.


Thanks for your help so far, it turned out to be quite easy. I'll do a final post once I have it all back up working as it should.


Question to robertmee: would the switch solution work for me if I install that in the garage, BEFORE the WiFi router?
 

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The problem you're having is that the two routers won't coexist without some configuration modifications. Updated firmware or a different wireless router won't fix it.


I would not install the switch before the router if it could be helped. The router offers hardware firewall protection. If you plug the switch straight into the modem, then your E2 connection is exposed to the internet. Maybe not a problem, since it's a TV. Also, I believe you would need two IP addresses from your ISP for that to work since your E2 connection is not tunnelling through the router to the WAN.


Why can't you move your existing router to the fiber modem?
 

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Is your garage far enough from the house that your wireless won't be useful if you put the wireless router out there? That would be the best option if your wireless still works. Then you can plug E1 and E2 directly into the ports on the wireless router and put your old, non-wifi router back in the attic, unused.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Now I understand the issues of switch before router. Not good, indeed.


My garage is at one end of a longish house and I wanted to keep the WiFi more central. I guess I have nothing to lose to check the WiFi reach from the garage. I would then still need something in the office, because I'm hard-wiring two PCs to the Internet there.


So, would a switch there work for me?


PS: Firmware upgrade was not available for the router, and I never got that combo to work.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moped /forum/post/15546488


Now I understand the issues of switch before router. Not good, indeed.


My garage is at one end of a longish house and I wanted to keep the WiFi more central. I guess I have nothing to lose to check the WiFi reach from the garage. I would then still need something in the office, because I'm hard-wiring two PCs to the Internet there.


So, would a switch there work for me?

Yes, the switch would work perfectly fine there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertmee /forum/post/15546928


Yes, the switch would work perfectly fine there.

Thank you, that's what I'll go for. I take it they are called switch, not hub, right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
...on second thought, I just found this, which leaves me confused:

"... routers are designed specifically to join the home (LAN) to the Internet (WAN) for the purpose of Internet connection sharing. In contrast, neither hubs nor switches are capable of joining multiple networks or sharing an Internet connection. A home network with only hubs and switches must designate one computer as the gateway to the Internet, and that device must possess two network adapters for sharing, one for the home LAN and one for the Internet WAN. With a router, all home computers connect to the router equally..."


Sharing an Internet connection is what I want to do, with two PCs online simultaneously. I don't need file or printer sharing between those two PCs.
 

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As long as your wireless router is closer to your fiber internet connection than the switch, it will be fine. The router will handle the "sharing" of your internet connection and the switch just allows you to have more ports than what's available on the router. Think of a switch kind of like a power strip that lets you have more outlets in any given location; that's just what you need in your office, right? Good luck!
 

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Here is a simple home network, this from a dumb amateur:


1. Set one wireless router next to the modem. You may need to take the laptop there and tweak it up, or even smarter crimp yourself a nice CAT5 stretch and take it all the way to your office/desk etc where you can hook up the router to the MAIN PC. Set 64 or 128 bit encription. Copy the router's MAC address. This will be your main router. Allow bridging, but only allow certain access points to connect, set MAC addresses of the other routers. If you want, buy a Canon network printer, and give it a fixed address below 100. Set DHCP range to 168.192.2.100-254, so that computers will find your printer with a fixed address easily.


2. Go buy 2-3 $20 Linksys or Belkin routers on the bay, these will become your access points. I have one in the office, one in living room, and one in basement, each with 4 ports. Set them as APs enslaved to your main router. Belkin routers will ask you to enter the main router's MAC address to pair. Always connect to the MAIN ROUTER hardwired into the main PC when programming the ACCESS POINTS/


3. For ease of use, lone desktops and laptops can get PCI and PCMCIA cards (OK if your laptop is ancient, most now have wifi) and they will only need your WEP key, as well as all the ROKUs, Fireballs or whatever media servers you set up. If your desktop is near an AP just wire it in.


This may be weird, but i set up my entire network through experimentation over a few days, what amazed me is how easy it was.


Of course VOIP and unlocked Sipura boxes followed, and when my xxxxxy Suddenlink fails i just plug my Treo 775p via an USB and get 1650kb/120kb EVDO which i clone back into my router, but this is a few years later.


And unless you hardwire your whole house for CAT5, dumb switches are best avoided, use the 4 ports on the back of your routers, ie now your bridged access points.


Keep in mind that failing to set security on a home network can result in credit card fraud and ID theft, they just caught a gang crusing in nice hoods with laptops keylogging people's comms.


As for FIOS, i feel sorry for the mortgage you have to pay
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moped /forum/post/15542221


Thanks for the responses so far. I'll give some more detail:


Fiber comes into garage. Fiber modem is built-in there but only has one ethernet female out.


Wired are two CAT-5 cables from garage to their respective outlets, E1 and E2.


E1 is now plugged into the modem and goes to my office, feeding the wireless router, located in the office. It is a full router (DLink DI-824VUP), with four LAN ports, but it is too far away from the TV and I don't want to run an open CAT-5 through the hallway and half the house.


E2 is going to the TV in the family room, but not yet connected to the fiber modem.


The other wired router I have is a DLink DI-704P.


Can I mess up my current wireless network if I just, for testing, install it in the garage and see if it all works, without further setting-up adjustments?


I agree, if a $30 switch would do the trick, I'd rather go that way, but the Fiber installer said I'd need a router.


You have lot of options. One is to add an access point in your office if the Wireless modem (now moved to the fiber box) is too far away.


See Option 1 here: Both Wireless can co-exist with same or different SSID's (doesn't really matter)


http://www.box.net/shared/o33ynz3nd5





Or if you have additional devices by your TV (like receivers etc) you can do this:
http://www.box.net/shared/huq0le4yxm


These days, you can't really buy a hub so any switch will work.


Hmm, adding the image didn't work with box.net so I changed it to a URL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Everything is now working as I need it.


The WiFi router is in the garage, WiFi reach is sufficient.


The Video Link gets its feed and works well.


The office (E2) is going into a $20 switch, both PCs are connected to it, and both have Internet access.


Couldn't be better. Thanks all, and robertmee in particular.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moped /forum/post/15557819


Everything is now working as I need it.


The WiFi router is in the garage, WiFi reach is sufficient.


The Video Link gets its feed and works well.


The office (E2) is going into a $20 switch, both PCs are connected to it, and both have Internet access.


Couldn't be better. Thanks all, and robertmee in particular.

Glad it worked out
 
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