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Hi - Was contemplating setting up an backyard theater and read through the posts. Didn't see much about laser projectors being used outdoors.

I was about 80% sure I was going to go with the Epson 1450 when I came across the Optoma GT1090. Cost, lumen, and resolution appear similar, and neither have lens shift.... Didn't know if anyone had any thoughts.

Probably looking at ~ 120" screen, and the kids will use it some so nice not to have to wait until it's entirely dark to start.

Thanks
Brett
 

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Hi - Was contemplating setting up an backyard theater and read through the posts. Didn't see much about laser projectors being used outdoors.

I was about 80% sure I was going to go with the Epson 1450 when I came across the Optoma GT1090. Cost, lumen, and resolution appear similar, and neither have lens shift.... Didn't know if anyone had any thoughts.

Probably looking at ~ 120" screen, and the kids will use it some so nice not to have to wait until it's entirely dark to start.

Thanks
Brett
Laser/LED has the benefit of relatively constant lumen output over time and use.

The UHD lamps like the HC1450 uses are a type of arc lamp. The lamps output will be at its brightest during the first 100-500 hours of use and at which point it will loose some percent of its output.

A projector is one part of a system which includes the screen as well as the environment it's used in. The image you see is a product of the projectors output (lumens), the amount of light reflected from the screen to your eyes (foot-lamberts), and the environment your in, i.e. how dark is it.

DLP projectors typically report their lumen output measuring only white light. So expect the Optoma GT1090's lumen output to be ~30%-40% less that the stated value with an actual color image displayed. In other words don't expect to get 4,200 lumens.

Epson reports its lumen output with consideration to color image output. It's quite safe to expect brighter image capability from the Epson HC1450. Epson projectors typically output slightly more lumens when tested than what is spec'd.

Both DLP and LCD projectors typically produce the best color when displaying something less than the stated maximum lumen output.

Good luck with not waiting until dark...

I've been working with front projection home theater for decades. We've been setting up outdoor backyard theater for 6 years now. I've yet to find a projector that will compete favorably with sunshine outdoors where the goal is to start the entertainment/movie early for the kids.

If your objective is to start early for the kids, do yourself a favor and buy a 75"-85" LCD TV to set up outside and call it a day.

It takes 15-20 minuets after sundown to get any kind of watchable/enjoyable image with a projector/screen outdoors. You can consult the internet for what is called "civil twilight" for the day you want to show a move. Civil Twilight is ~30 minuets after sundown and starting before is going to result in a washed out picture with little to no image visible.

FWIW, I've used the HC1450 and I currently use an Epson HC1060 on a 144" screen. The HC1060 will match the HC1450 output for a 120" screen quite favorably for half the cost.
 

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b curry - really appreciate the info. I know the basics but don't keep up very much anymore and things change quickly. Back in 2000 I had a Sony G70 and then a G90. Moved houses in 2010 and hung a JVC RS50 and haven't thought about projectors since. Mine keeps going and I like it, and other than a bulb change, I haven't had to do anything to it.

I completely understand what you're saying about not being able to beat the sun. Just didn't know if I was already looking at $1500 for the 1450, whether something $500-600 more would be bright enough to give me a 20 minute head start and have a few more features, etc. I've read a number of good reviews on the HC1060. Maybe I'll start there - can always trade up if I fall in love with another project.

Thanks again
Brett
 

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b curry - really appreciate the info. I know the basics but don't keep up very much anymore and things change quickly. Back in 2000 I had a Sony G70 and then a G90. Moved houses in 2010 and hung a JVC RS50 and haven't thought about projectors since. Mine keeps going and I like it, and other than a bulb change, I haven't had to do anything to it.

I completely understand what you're saying about not being able to beat the sun. Just didn't know if I was already looking at $1500 for the 1450, whether something $500-600 more would be bright enough to give me a 20 minute head start and have a few more features, etc. I've read a number of good reviews on the HC1060. Maybe I'll start there - can always trade up if I fall in love with another project.

Thanks again
Brett
Brett - here's my HC1060 on a 144" screen. It's approximately 15-20 minuets after sundown in the photo.

I've down sized to a 144" screen from 165" mostly for the ease of setup/take down. My 165" screen was about 2 hours vs. 20 minuets setup/take down for the 144". The HC1060 did a very good job on the 165" at night and I've used it up to 200". The picture is brighter on the 144" but not so much as to make any significant improvement in start time.

I started with a Kloss Nova Beam, on to a Dwin, and then on to digital years ago.

The beauty of the HC1060 is that it's small, has instant off, and no cool down required. So if you get a flash rain storm, you can scoop it up quickly without damage. Replacement lamps are cheap direct from Epson ($59.00). Colors are quite good right out of the box. You won't have JVC black levels but then almost no one does. Contrast is good enough and you would have payed 10x more than the MSRP of the HC1060 not so long ago for this kind of picture quality. I liked the color on the HC1060 a little better than the HC1450.

With a new lamp on the HC1060, you get a little over 3000 lumens on Dynamic setting. I use the Cinema or Bright Cinema mode with complete darkness which puts you in the mid 2000 lumens range and nice color.

On a 120" screen at night after sundown, the HC1060 is going to look like a big LCD TV.


 
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