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I am considering having this procedure done and would be interested in any reports on before/after experiences. I have seen some vague references to diminished contrast resolution following LASIK out there in net-land. :eek:


Thought I would post this question on this forum as there appear to be a number of particularly critical viewers here.


Thanks,

Brent
 

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While we are at it, I'm considering paying for breast enhancement surgery for a female friend. But I'm similarly worried that if I focus too much on her breasts after the surgery, I may suffer from diminished contrast resolution. And as much as I'd like her to have bigger breasts, I do have my HT priorities you know. Are there any videophiles out there that would like to share their experiences regarding dimished contrast resolution after their significant other underwent breast enhancement surgery?
 

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Had it done about 6 years ago and very happy with the results. I was very near sighted and had to wear glasses or contacts all the time including watching TV or movies. I've never heard of reduced contrast resolution as a potential problem, and have never noticed it. It is an advantage for watching movies since I don't get the edge distortion produced by glasses, it's more like wearing contacts.
 

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QQQ, although there exists the possibility of diminished contrast resolution, it is more than made up for in increased depth of field. You'll begin to notice a more 3 dimensional aspect of certain things around you. Another drawback is that your eyes will be heavier. You will notice them dropping below eye level much of the time.


**edit sorry Don, couldn't resist**


FWIW Lasik is a big No-No for professional aviators, get Lasik = don't get job!
 

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QQQ- Have you asked her? Maybe she is thinking about you having something enhanced too. Hey... You asked for it!


Brent had a legitimate serious inquiry but your answer was inappropriate.
 

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I have no idea about the contrast resolution, but you might find that you notice a lot more thing artifacts. Seeing more detail could be a good thing or a bad thing for your HT experiences.


My way-from-audiophile ears have saved me a ton of money on audio equipment.


--Darin
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Don Landis
Brent had a legitimate serious inquiry but your answer was inappropriate.
I know I'll be sure to turn to AVS Forum whenever I need medical advice.


--Jerome
 

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I had it done in January and and the only real side effect for HT (aside from 20/15 vision) is some haloing around moderately lit objects in really low APL scenes. This occurs only in a completely darkened room and we are talking very low APL's. Scenes with high contrast, even if the overall APL is very low, are fine. I should mention that i am using a CRT projector at the moment. There is some minor haloing around lights while driving at night, but it's not much worse than it was before surgery, and it doesn't diminish the level of detail I'm capable of perceiving.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by jsaliga
I know I'll be sure to turn to AVS Forum whenever I need medical advice.


--Jerome
Thank you for picking up on the true meaning of my post Jerome. I wasn't criticizing Brent for asking - I just found it a little bit humorous.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Jetlag
FWIW Lasik is a big No-No for professional aviators, get Lasik = don't get job!
Interesting. Why is that? Is there actually a screening procedure to enforce that?
 

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I am an ophthalmologist and was trained to do lasik and PRK. I spent several years traveling around the world learning about the excimer laser in the performance of PRK which is the predecessor of lasik. This was before the excimer laser was approved by the FDA for use in America. I do mostly cataract surgery. I wound up not doing lasik because most people in my patient population could not afford it. Like a lot of people on this forum I tend to be a perfectionist, and I found myself in the uncomfortable position of having to sell something that I knew that I could not guarantee to be 100% perfect every time. Every thing in life has a risk including lasik. I found that my own patients wanted a 100% guarantee that they would not have any problems, and on top of that they had been fed a steady stream of come on advertisements from a multitude of sources including the discount providers, and on top of that they didn't want to pay anything for the procedure. Unless you are running a mill your costs are so high that you cannot make any profit doing it.


One possible side effect is halos at night which might occur in a darkend room. This might occur if the pupil size in the darkened room is larger than the optical zone size of the corneal laser ablation. Of course scotopic and photopic pupil sizes are supposed to be carefully measured before the procedure. Some people who have mild to moderate degrees of myopia don't realize that they will be trading uncorrected near for distance acuity when they become presbyopic and will need glasses for reading or to touch up their distance vision. Of course there are other possble advantages of lasik. With the advent of wavefront technology and third generation excimer lasers it appears that it will be possible to eliminate many of the higher orders of optical distortion that plague human vision not just simple refractive errors.


There are sites on the internet where people discuss their horror stories after lasik. I'm sorry I don't know the web addresses, but I'm sure you could do a search. No one knows for sure what the long term consequences of lasik might be 40 or 50 years after the procedure. A significant number of people develop an optic neuropathy similar to glaucoma when they become elderly except that they don't have elevated intraocular pressures, and many of them seem to get progressively worse despite our best efforts to treat them i.e. lowering an already "normal" intraocular pressure. Part of the lasik procedure consists of placing a suction device on the eye which elevates the intraocular pressure to very high levels sufficient to shut off the blood flow in the central retinal artery for a short period od time. Vision stops during this time, and fortunately it's not for very long. I don't know if anyone knows what happens to the retinal ganglion cells, etc. during this time. This suction device is necessary to fixate the eye and make it possible to cut a perfect flap on the cornea. It will be many years in the future before any significant double blind statistical studies can be done to see if there is an increase in the incidence of optic neuropathy in patients who have had lasik. A significant number of the fibers in our optic nerves die a natural death as we age in normal people. I don't think anyone can tell for sure if this will increase significantly in people who have had lasik until this can be studied in the future.


I can understand the motivation in people who are highly dependent on glasses to have the procedure. I even know at least 3 ophthalmologists here locally who have had the procedure. I think they find it easier to sell the procedure if they've had it done on themselves. Fortunately I only have a small refractive error and of course presbyopia. I've worn glasses for the last 25 years and don't mind it at all. I even forget that I've got them on, but I can function without them except for reading.


Good luck to you whatever you decide.


Larry
 

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I have often though about doing it myself. I have met many people who have had it done and the results vary surprising based on where its done. For example, I know two people who had it done at UCLA Hospital opthamology deparment (experts in the field) where they were butchered and needed to have the procedure repeated in order to get it right while on ther other hand I know people who had it done in mini malls locations and it came out perfectly. I am assuming there are many variables that come into play in this from the patient to the facility to the actual person performng the procedure. My closest friend had it done and it came out perfectly. I am a CPA by trade and had a boss once that had it done but needed to be done differently. He was a big big big golfer and once the procedure is done I think depth perception does not remain the same (maybe way pilots cant use this) I am sure Larry can clarify this assuming what I am saying is correct, but he had it done so his depth perception wasnt ruined


In the end, all those I know who had it done eventualy had were happy with it.
 

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Visit http://www.surgicaleyes.com


The site itself is a hideous mess :) but there are quite a few reports of people having had trouble with the procedure.


Here is a link to the experiences some have had:

http://www.surgicaleyes.org/Experiences.htm


It's not all bad but... do think about it. Essentially it is a process that is completely irreversible and if something goes wrong, your eyesight will be destroyed for life. Is it really that difficult to wear glasses or contacts?


I wouldn't let someone carve on my eyes with lasers on a bet, and most certainly not until some other poor guinea pigs have lived with their eyes for a few decades or more so we know what the long term effects may be.


Read up on it. Then read up some more. After that, really start studying the stats, numbers and stuff. Only then make a decision...


This isn't like buying new glasses, after all, this is a surgical procedure.
 

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I will say that if I only had a mild or even moderate degree of myopia, I would not have opted to have surgery. My vision was horrible without contacts or glasses, anything over a foot away was a blurry, indistinct mess, and I was totally dependant on corrective lenses. I feel the tradeoffs that I've made are more than acceptable considering that 98% of the time I have better than normal vision. It would be 99% but I own a CRT that I watch in complete darkness all the time. Even in these conditions haloing is rare and confined to only the darkest programming.


Daniel, I'm not sure what your boss had done, but I haven't experienced any loss of depth perception since the procedure. Quite the opposite, it's better now. Of course, the doctor that performed my procedure was the same one that performed Tiger Woods', Dr. Whitten, and I don't think Tiger's depth perception has been affected either.
 

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I am ready to take the plunge for this surgery. Most studies say that those that do the most procedures have the best success rates. Makes sense.


A 98% success is pretty good bet for success and what ever shortcomings or complications may happen years down the road, I am sure that future technology will be able to correct it.


I am dependent on my glasses and have yearned for years to shed them. I do require excellent vision and can't afford a bad result as I do a fair amount of surgery myself in my practice. I work under magnification all day long.


Besides, the current procedure no longer requires a dermatome. A laser is used for the cut. From what I know, most complications are from the flap.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by QQQ
Are there any videophiles out there that would like to share their experiences regarding dimished contrast resolution after their significant other underwent breast enhancement surgery?
absolutely, specially at lower temperature, haven't you heard the headlight effect? ;)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Larry Raulston

I am an ophthalmologist and was trained to do lasik and PRK. I spent several years traveling around the world learning about the excimer laser in the performance of PRK which is the predecessor of lasik.
I'm an emergency physician, so this isn't my field, so take comments with grain of salt prn. I'm sure you're aware of the differences, but for those not in the know... PRK is a considerably different procedure, and the results were never as consistent as LASIK. My mother had PRK done and the end-result was pretty good but it required a follow-up procedure, and the recovery period just seemed incredibly uncomfortable.

Quote:
I found myself in the uncomfortable position of having to sell something that I knew that I could not guarantee to be 100% perfect every time.
Well, nothing's 100% perfect in our world. There's always something that can (and eventually does) go wrong. At least with cataract surgery, it's unlikely to make their vision any worse.

Quote:
One possible side effect is halos at night which might occur in a darkend room.
I had them for quite a while after my LASIK procedure, but they're pretty much gone now (six years later). Even immediately after the surgery, they weren't significantly worse than I got with eyeglasses.

Quote:
There are sites on the internet where people discuss their horror stories after lasik.
To be fair, there are web sites out there describing horror stories following practically every frequently done surgical procedure. A quick google search on "circumcision" will provide the most obvious example. As we both know, it's often the result of people performing procedures without adequate training/preparation.

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A significant number of people develop an optic neuropathy similar to glaucoma when they become elderly
Hadn't heard about this. Do you have a citation handy? Was the incidence signifcantly above the baseline?

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It will be many years in the future before any significant double blind statistical studies can be done to see if there is an increase in the incidence of optic neuropathy in patients who have had lasik.
I'll avoid making "blinded study" jokes to an ophthalmologist, as I'm sure that got old pretty fast. :) However, it seems pretty difficult to do a double-blind study. How is one going to fool the patient that he has or hasn't had eye surgery? Much easier when you're just giving a sugar pill. (Ooh, it's really difficult not to make a joke about blinded studies.)


Greg
 

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If the surgery will result in better than 20/20 vision, then you will see more screendoor!!
 
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