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I'm looking at the new Runco CX-46HD LCD display since the Sony and Sharp displays of the same size seem to be having some serious issues. However, I ran across a disclaimer in the warranty about burn-in on LCD. Is this a real problem or did the lawyers just copy the text from their plasma manual?


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Image retention on LCD display panels is specifically excluded from coverage under this Limited Warranty. Image retention or staining of an image is the result of misuse of the product and therefore cannot be repaired under the terms of this Limited

Warranty.

Normal viewing material such as television/satellite broadcasts, videotape or DVDs (not put into pause for extended periods of time) will not cause damage to your display under normal conditions. Many DVD players are also equipped with screen savers for this reason.

TO AVOID IMAGE RETENTION (Burn-in): Please ensure that still images are not left on your LCD display panel. Also ensure that images displayed in the 4:3 aspect ratio mode (black or gray stripes, but no picture information is present on the left and right edges of the screen) are used as infrequently as possible. This will prevent permanent retention on your LCD display panel, which can be seen permanently under certain conditions once burn-in has occurred.

The types of images to avoid include video games, still images and computer screens with stationary tool bars and icons. (This is why computers are equipped with screen savers - to prevent still images from burning into the monitor's phosphors after being displayed continuously for an extended period of time).
 

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IR can exist on LCDs, but generally it is something that either goes away quickly, or can be made to go away by either powering down the set off for a day or two, or running a white image for a period of time. It is not the same thing as "burn-in" on a CRT or PDP, since there are no phosphors to burn, and already is a pretty rare phenopmenon.


On some older-tech LCD sets there have been reports of permanent IR, perhaps due to a long-term image affecting one of the plastic layers of the screen. This is extremely rare, and should not be a danger on a quality set. - DR
 

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dr0s is correct. There is a stuck charge in the transistor that can produce a short term, "stuck" image, that lasts until the charge goes away. This can take a few minutes (or even longer) depending on how long the static image is on the screen. Since the LCD TVs use the same technology as the notebook and desktop monitor, do THEY have an issue???


Plasmas can and will BURN IN an image. Heavily used pixels, in a static image will eventually produce LESS light than "fresh" pixels. This will look like a burn-in image on a white screen. Plasmas are trying fix/minimize the issue but it is what happens with emmissive devises. But heck, CRT TV's have had this problem and no one complains about them? Right?


DB
 

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on the lcd computer monitors at my work, there is alot of IR (permenant). Then again the lcd monitors are like 6+ yuears old and have been runing 24/7 ever since on the exact screen. I dont know why its permenant but it is. I have never seen permenant IR on any sort of tv tho or lcd anywhere else.
 

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007craft, if the damage is permanent then it is due to deterioration of a plastic layer. However, (a) newer technology is, well, newer, (b) TVs tend to use better panels than computer monitors, and (c) are you absolutely positive that the IR is permanent? (For example, have you tried running a pure white image for a couple of days?) - DR
 
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