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Advice please-


I have had a 26 inch LCD mounted in my unfinished garage for a couple years now. I just upgraded it to a larger 32 inch LCD this week. During the winter, the temperature outside can get into the 20's here in North Carolina.


I realize this isn't the ideal environment for a LCD, but is there anything I can do to protect the LCD or help extend the life of the LCD in this environment? A 32 inch is too large for me to cart in and out of the garage, but I have had thoughts of creating some sort of cloth cover for the tv that I could use when the tv is unplugged.


Thanks!
 

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The minimum storage temperature for electronic devices including LCDs is around zero degrees F, below that cold starts to damage components like capacitors that contain liquid electrolytes. The operating temperature minimum is probably a lot higher around 50 degrees F. (Look up the set specifications for the exact figures.)


The risk that you run in operating a set at a temperature below the specified operating temperature range is that moisture (from breathing or clothes drying or just from high atmospheric humidity) may condense upon the cold electonics and then you will have liquid trickles running through sensitive electronics, risking circuit damage from electrical short circuits. In fact since the set is partially powered up in the standby state, it should be unplugged when below the operating temperature range.


If you keep these principles in mind, you should not have an issue. I am assuming that you won't be operating the set whenever it is uncomfortably cold in the garage. If you must do so, then put a heater out there and use a small fan to blow heated air across the set to warm it up before plugging it in and turning it on.
 

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I would think that you would need to heat it up for awhile to prevent board solder cracking from the temp differences. I've seen lcds operated in cold weather like that and the panel reacts slower too. There's more smearing and the picture can get pretty unwatchable. I always advise not to watch an lcd like that in cold weather, even indoors like a garage. Some people want to though and if so I wouldn't spend a chunk of change on a good panel and would just get something to suffice.


I've actually had more success with a plasma in such cold weather but there's nothing anymore under 42" so I guess that would be out of the question.
 

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The issue at -10 C (20F) is the CCFLs. As with any fluorescent tube, the CCFLs in the set will not ignite below +32F. If attempted and "IF" the do not ignite, the tubes are being beaten to death and will cause premature failure of the tubes. The LCD itself is fine except for the slowness in its response time, which is only annoying but not fatal.


The only other concern is condensation. If the display gets visibly damp as it warms up, don't apply power until it dries. Water and electricity don't mix.
 
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