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I have been trying to resolve this issue of action video (from movies or live sports) in the HD format. First impressions were of unacceptable amounts of blurriness when camera panning, and my previous thread resulted in posts describing signal strength, cameras used, etc.


My question now is, which display type is "quicker?" I use the word "quicker" to help me determine which type of TV will interfere the least with the action items I am trying to view. I may be nibbling around the idea of refresh rate of the monitor, but am a bit corn-fused.:rolleyes:


I have pretty much dismissed CRTs due to my perception that their PQ is not up to snuff for action sports. I have liked what I have seen with the Sony GWII LCD and the Samsung DLP units (and that's all that I have seen so far).


I'm guessing that LCD may be slower that other types of RPTVs, and that plasma is probably the best (but beyond my budget). Am I anywhere being correct about monitor speeds and their ability to keep up with action sports? Or is it more at the other end of the pipe, in the source?


I need a clue here, being disappointed with HD format for this purpose so far.


Thanks in advance for your assistance!
 

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There's discussion in this link (about 1/3rd down) by Greg Rogers that outlines 'speed' requirements for CRT-based FPs and HDTV. As he points out, only graphics-grade FPs approach these needed specs for 'full' HDTV (not being delivered so far, as outlined here ). That's not saying other technologies can't. Think I'll avoid a back-and-forth about whether flipping molecules in LCDs, switching microscopic mirrors back and forth, ionizing tiny gas cells, or manipulating electron beams within CRTs is superior. -- John
 

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I think the idea you're 'nibbling around' is frame rate, not refresh rate. Smoothness of motion is better when the number of images per second (frame rate) is higher, since the amount of motion between frames is smaller. Refresh rate is the number of times per second the screen is repainted, but is unrelated to the number of different images per second. Each image is painted several times to assure a uniform brightness on the screen. 720p has a frame rate of 60, while 1080i has a frame rate of 30. Another motion issue has to do with motion artifacts caused when motion occurs between the capture of the odd and even fields of an interlaced image. Adjacent lines then show a moving object in two locations. Capturing all lines progressively eliminates this. Because of doubled frame rate and motion artifact free progressive scan, most consider 720p native display superior to 1080i for this type of content.
 
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