AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that each technology has its own plusses and minuses, and that this is the main minus for LCD panels. I've just read an article from another thread that makes the situation sound hopeless and quite distractingly severe, as if LCDs are useless for home theater. The article was mainly talking about projectors, but some parts of it could be interpretted as including LCD panels.


Still, some people use these things in their home theaters, so it must be good enough, or managible. And, having only seen LCD monitors a few times, in use for computer stuff rather than home theater, and only in the lighting that was there at the time, I don't have the experience to be totally sure of what I'll be getting myself into if I get an LCD panel, so I have to borrow some of yours, since that seems to be the way to go for me other than this one issue...


What do you guys do with your LCD screens? Have you found brightness/contrast settings that handle it? Is it better/worse in a lit room than a dark one, and/or do you change your settings depending on the lighting, and does that make it work equally well in both? Do you notice it during dark scenes in movies and TV and wish you didn't have that kind of screen for those moments? Have some manufacturers found better ways of handling it than others? I have a direct-view CRT right now, which I always have set at the lowest possible contrast because I don't like high contrast anyway, and I tend to watch it in light more than in the dark; what does that preference say about me and LCD panels (or any other type)?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,566 Posts
if you want to buy a single HDTV monitor for your HT, I think you should look to a plasma for the best overall picture quality


LCD displays, while getting much better, still cannot compare in terms of black level and color rendering- they also show more motion blur on fast moving HD as compared to plasmas. Calibration may help but only a little


LCD's do have some advantages- they look best in a brightly lit room- they are not subject to burn-in, and they run cooler


there is lots of debate on this- this is my opinion: I think if you put a high end plasma next to a high end LCD and feed them both the same HD signal, the plasma would be my choice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by markrubin
if you want to buy a single HDTV monitor for your HT, I think you should look to a plasma for the best overall picture quality
I am not considering plasmas at all. For one thing, I'm underwhelmed by the picture quality that plasma fans espouse. Also, size is not much of a concern for now. Right now, I've only got a TV that's hardly over 13", so even a 17" widescreen monitor will be an increase in both height and width. Eventually, I'd like to have two screens: one about that size or maybe up to the low 20s, and a much larger projection screen (or maybe plasma), but for now, I can only get one screen to complete the PC I'm going to build. And I'd rather have that one be a size that can be used for normal computer functions on a desktop, and still bigger than the TV I'm used to (especially for widescreen material), than have a single larger screen that would feel awkward for computer use and cost a bunch more money. (The one I've got right now is built into the computer, which I plan to replace, so I can't transfer it over.)

Quote:
Originally posted by markrubin
LCD displays, while getting much better, still cannot compare in terms of black level
That's the issue that concerns me, and that's why I'm trying to get a sense of its severity. I've seen the ones in the stores and played with them a bit, and I don't see much of a problem, but my home isn't a store and TV and movies aren't the computer feed the monitors on the shelves get, so I'm trying to get an idea from LCD owners of whether or not it's a good thing for me. If not, I can go for a CRT direct-view monitor, but I'd rather have a flat panel if it won't be too much of a problem.

Quote:
Originally posted by markrubin
LCD's do have some advantages- they look best in a brightly lit room- they are not subject to burn-in, and they run cooler
Those are among the reasons why I won't be getting a plasma, at least not anytime soon for this "first" monitor.

Quote:
Originally posted by markrubin
there is lots of debate on this- this is my opinion: I think if you put a high end plasma next to a high end LCD and feed them both the same HD signal, the plasma would be my choice
But that's a different question from the one I'm trying to figure out right now...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Peculiar. The LCD owners don't seem to want to talk about it. Most of the time, the owners of a particular type of equipment are quick to talk about how the problems are overstated and why they're such good devices. I know I already like LCD panels for computer use alone, but can life with an LCD panel for TV/movies really be that bad?... This would not seem to be a good sign.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I only find LCD's black level a problem when watching movies recorded in 2.35:1 aspect ratio, the black bars are not black. It is not a problem (to me) for any other material. The Sharp Aquos 30" and 37" have a feature called OPC that will automatically dim the brightness in a darkened room (via a light sensor on the display), this works well for me.


All in all the advantages of a higher resolution, more compact, cooler running, burnin-free display outweigh the black level issue. Having said that if LCD manufacters can fix it in the next year or two I'll probably upgrade :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,327 Posts
I like the Sony 30" xbr900 LCD a lot (I have yet to see the Mits and also need to post a few questions in mark rubin's 3 way shoot out thread) but the blacks are still an issue for me - and not just in the black bars. Dark scenes and shadows look blotchy and black is not dark enough. This was from viewing in low light level conditions in the Sony showroom in Manhattan. When viewing HD in brighter conditions (Harvey in ABC near Union Square) those problems were not evident.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,295 Posts
Hello,


Welcome to the world of LCD TV's! These are known problems, getting better, but still present: Low level color tracking / grayscale / black are not *black* with many/most LCD TVs.


The "Sound and Vision" DVD can really show what is happening with the 30IRE window. If the set is having a problem but can still produce something like white at 30 IRE then the left hand side from 20 IRE to 7 IRE

will be a real eye opener. I've seen reds/greens/blues/browns, even a mix of these colors/shades in this range.


In these cases black and white program material is not black and white at all but sometimes green and whiteish, red and whitish, blue and whitish. Sometimes is a mixture of all three and whitish. Sometimes it's not best to watch black and white on an LCD at all if one expects *black and white*.


Still, there are some LCD TV screens I've seen that do a commendable job with B&W, gray tracking, and low light (there may be others):


1. Toshiba SD-P1000 portable DVD player. I think the screen on this player is amazing. Great low level color tracking and color reproduction. A mimimum of the posterization/solarization effects. Contrast OK but viewing angle not the best (better than most portables though). Two backlight settings.


2. Panasonic TC-11LV1 - Good tracking and low level color reproduction. May be better than the SD-P1000 in this area. Almost a complete lack of posterization/solarization. Only let down by the "interlaced looking" display, a slight red push, and slightly depressed green. Adjustable backlight so level contrast can be made pretty good in most lighting situations.


Best regards,


Paul Bigelow
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top