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Discussion Starter #1
OK, now we are starting to see LCoS technology really take off. We have multiple companies OEMing their chips and light engines out to all types of manufacturers. The marketplace eventually reveals what some of us enthusiasts knew all along... LCoS kicks butt!


The real question is, with JVC coming out with their 2048x1536(QXGA) chip and Three-Five systems coming out with 1920x1600(what do you call that) and Hitachi and others in the game, when will we get to a point where one of these products will be in our home theaters?


This kind of competition should be great for the consumer. What's the future for TI? will they still be just spinning their wheels?
 

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Can't wait to see LCOS technology, should be great.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Can't wait to see LCOS technology, should be great.
er - why don't you look on existing D-ILAs??
 

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Competition is almost always a win for the consumer. The developements of products soon to come is going to be quite interesting.


If I recall correctly, the products that you are referencing are very expensive. Not in the range for most hometheater enthusiasts. But the good thing is that these new releases will replace what was high end, along with competition should mean savings to the consumer.


DarrenW
 

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Well, I bought my D-ILA (G10) for 3,500 $ including a ceiling mount and a new (6 hours) lamp.


D-ILAs can be bought used and ad this price I could not find anything compareable. Nothing a normal HT-enthusiasts could not afford.


By the way: How much is a TAW-rock?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Exactly! When the G10 came out it had a retail of like $18,000. Prototypes cost more obviously. That was only about 5 years ago.


I fear now we live in a different era. LCoS chips will probably not be mass produced lile DLP units have. This is just a guess because I don't know what the true manufactureing costs are between DLP and LCoS. What the consumer does have on it's side is multiple companies in competition.


Yes, some really cool projectors are coming out but I just can't see the trickle down effect of prices and technology that we saw in the ninetees. There are a lot of great small DLP projectors for presentations that are only $2-3k. Why would businesses upgrade to a $7-10k LCoS projector that's a little more bulky but yeilds a little better picture? The fact is the business digital projector market is what allowed many of us to reap big technology rewards at a small price. I just don't see this trend continuing.


The good thing is Manufacturing of these units has become commonplace. That means there is huge margins and hopfully prices will start coming down.



Two things I've never understood.

1. How can some of these digital projectors cost as much as a car?

2. How can some of these digital projectors cost as much as a CRT?
 

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Tryg,

Yes, production numbers have always been the problem for LCOS. Without a lower end, high volume product, there's no economy of scale to drive prices down. There will never be a new LCOS product that can compete with lcd/dlp boardroom projectors in a price war until volume in achieved.

Long live the used LCOS!

Jeff
 

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On the other hand, refer to the article in EE Times referenced in this thread: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...threadid=90830


Specifically this quote:

"Unit shipments of LCOS devices for microdisplays have overtaken shipments of MEMS-type displays in 2001, to make LCOS the second most prevalent microdisplay technology, according to a recent report from Stanford Resources-iSuppli, which tracks the electronic display industry. But the research firm attributed the shift largely to rapid growth in the camcorder- and camera-viewfinder segments. LCOS will penetrate the near-eye application market more deeply than the projection market, accounting for 41 percent of near-eye market value in 2007 but only 8 percent of the projection market value, the firm predicted."


So the technology itself is getting enough production, even though the projector-application market is a smaller percentage.


Furthermore, as business displays advance, so too will the demand for higher rez projectors. Just like the migration from 800x600 computer displays to 1024x768 computer displays pushed the digital projector market to the dominance of XGAs today, higher resolutions for flat-panels and the like will push demand for SXGA and higher capable projectors like the D-ILAs and LCOS models.


At a street of around $6000, I'd say the Hitachi LCOS projector is making the market very competitive right now! Its performance remains to be seen, but I would expect that with some tweaking through something like a modded DILARD & ColorFacts, it ought yield a very competitive price/peformance ratio.... fingers crossed of course!
 
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