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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several dealers (who do NOT carry Lexicon) have told me the MC-12b is great for theater, but if music is equally important to me, Lexicon is NOT the best choice for the money. They recommend Krell, Classe orTheta.


Is the Lexicon excellent for music, or not?


Thanks
 

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wow... ya really wanna open that up !! ?...hehe...


First I want to say that the MC12B is an incredible box, a materpeice in AV components.

Now, I say like all in life its subjective to what you like in a sound.

Some of us MC12B owners love it and/or are very happy with it, and some of us find that it can be better.


Personally, the mids arn't as fuller and warmer as I like it, over all tonality is thin in the upper end roll off. However, I have different hardware and very very reveiling speakers that may play a part in that.


Best way is to try and see ...well...hear !

good luck ...
 

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Here was my path.


Citation 7.0 to . . .


Proceed PAV/PDSD to . . .


Krell HTS2 . . . to


Lexicon MC-12B.


When I had the Proceed, I missed the Citation for Six-Axis. The Proceed was otherwise outstanding sonically.


The Krell was, all things considered, a step down. It was not as dynamic as the Proceed. It was still a decent piece, but not up to the level of the Proceed. The problem with the 2-3 second signal lock delay was, well, a problem . . .


The Lexicon is head and shoulders above all of them. I've forgotten about the Citation. It equals or betters the Proceed in 2 channel listening (and the PDSD used the same DACs, I believe, as were used in Levinson equipment), and it leaves all of them in the dust when it comes to sophisticated music surround modes, as well as for home theater usage.


I have grown increasingly skeptical of the distinction between equipment performing "well" on home theater, but poorly on music, or vice versa. That's really a code phrase for saying that something is bad musically, but "good" for home theater. Everything I've heard perform well on music has also performed well on home theater. What people are really talking about in those distinctions, I think, is the difference between the type of subwoofer you can get away with for home theater, as opposed to for serious music listening. What they're really saying is that "for those explosions in the James Bond Movies, this system is fine, but for exquisite muscial resolution, well . . ."


It's usually a phrase used by dealers who want to steer you from a product they don't sell. Just like the ones you've talked with.


Leave aside all the great stuff that Lexicon offers . . . outstanding versatility, flexibility, upgrade paths, bleeding edge surround technology . . . and just focus on the sound. It's better than any I've had. And when you throw all the other stuff in . . . it is by far the best A/V purchase I've ever made.


Oh, it's great for watching movies, too. But that to me is secondary.


Nick :cool:
 

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The Lexicon is excellent for music, and arguably the only choice for music, because:


1. Excellent surround matrix modes for deriving 5 or 7 channels from 2-channel material like CD. Only Meridian is competitive in terms of surround modes, with DPL II a step down if you use 7 channels. Circle Surround is a big step down from DPL II, and DTS Neo is huge step down from CS, and is basically a joke.


2. Transparent analog bypass for two-and five-channel sources, so if you don't trust the excellent ADCs in the MC-12, you can have a very good analog preamp. Meridian doesn't have this.


3. The option of applying ADC to two- and five-channel sources so you can do bass management and time-alignment, which are especially important for multi-channel music sources like DVD-A and SACD, both of which have only analog output options.


I wouldn't touch a Krell prepro with a 10-foot pole. The HTS 2 looked like a project out of Audio Amateur held together with expensive screws. The HTS 7.1 looks considerably better, but because of the digital-lock delay, it seems like Krell digital design is still done by illiterates who can't read data sheets. Their user interface is also terrible.


Madrigal (Proceed and Mark Levinson) couldn't design their way out of a wet paper bag with their "statement" No. 31 and 30 transport/DAC combo, and the 300-series amps, so I have even less faith in their abilities to produce competent DACs when more of them are needed to be sold at a lower price point, let alone an entire surround prepro. The AVP also had a mediocre user interface.


Theta DACs were unimpressive in the first Casablanca, and it looks like they've improved them in the CBII, but it's yet another generic prepro with perhaps fancy DACs, and no interesting surround features to speak of. If you want high-quality DA conversion, why get a CBII instead of a dedicated two-channel DAC?


Personally, I use my MC-12 primarily for music, and that's the main reason I got it. That it does good home theater is icing.


--Andre
 

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I owned the AVP prior to getting the MC-12. I really liked the sound quality of the AVP and was a bit concerned that the MC-12B wouldn't stack up. It does. The MC-12B has more detail. Others have commented that it is not as warm as the original AVP but I don't perceive that difference - either way they must be close because a lot of ex-AVP owners really like their MC-12B. Although the AVP has weaknesses compared to the MC-12B I disagree with the comment that it "had a mediocre user interface.". It's really very intuitive to setup and operate and that aspect of its operation has always received high marks in the reviews I've read.


I haven't listened to the other contenders in awhile so will not comment on them. In my mind one needs to decide on how the pre-pro is going to be used and then make decisions from there. If you're into high-end 2-ch stereo than stereo surround modes won't mean much. The Lex is a very decent stand alone 2 channel preamp but you may hear sonic differences between it and other high end 2 channel preamps. Only you can decide what sounds best... If you're into HT or music surrounds than that's another matter altogether. Very few manufacturers (i.e., Meridian) can match the Lex for surround processing. Lexicon and Meridian have years of experience with surround processing and that experience translates into excellent surround algorithms. IMO, if you want excellent sound with some of the best surround processing available Lexicon and Meridian are the only real choices.
 

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Like Nick and Andre, I bought my MC-12 primarily for music listening. In fact when I went to audition it I brought along 8 or 9 CDs but only one DVD. And with the MC-12 in my system, that's how my priorities have remained; I'll watch maybe 1 or 2 movies a week, but I listen to music every day.


Some people buy surround processors to use as multi-channel pre-amps. You know how it is: 2 channel material is played over 2 speakers, 5 channel music played over 5 speakers, etc. Other people buy surround processors for the surround processing, which is the category I fall into as I have no interest in letting the technological limitations of a delivery format decide the number of channels I listen to; ESPECIALLY when it comes to music. Because multi-channel music is in its infancy and the amount of software available relatively small, surround processing is very important and neccessary to breathe new life into our current 2 channel music collections. And when it comes to surround processing for music, the only two processes I would consider are Lexicon's Logic 7 and Meridian's Tri-Field.


The only way find out if those dealers were correct or not is to take some of your favourite recordings and go listen to an MC-12 yourself. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.


Best,

Sanjay
 

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CCClapp,


You startes the thread with the obvious answer " the several dealers who does NOT carry Lexicon told me that......" Do you think if you went into a Toyota dealership they would praise the Nissan?


Rather then trust what the dealer tells you, go to a lexicon dealer who carries great speakers/amps too and bring 2-1000 of your favorite CD's and kill an afternoon listening to the MC-12B. There is one dealer in Nashua, NH who carries Lexicon and Revel/Thiel/Meridian (and other good ones) speakers is Ensamble AV. I have had nothing but good conversations with them.


Good Luck and let YOUR ears tell whether it sounds good!


Mike
 

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This might have been true with the MC-1. I upgraded from MC-1 to MC-12B. The MC-12B two channel music blows the doors off the MC-1.
 

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I think the MC-12 is an excellent unit


shortly after I got it, I received an email with a similar theme-"as long as you don't like to listen to music..."


Outrageous! the MC-12 does not differentiate between music and theater- these are self serving statements from people who do not sell the MC-12

Oh yes- in my humble opinion


Mark:)
 

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"Not Good" is such a relative term.

I think that those that say the MC-12 is "not good" for music mean is this:


1. The MC-12 is a "world-class" processor for HT, regardless of cost.


2. If you compared the MC-12 to "world-class" 2-channel separates ( DAC + Pre ), regardless of cost, you might hear that the MC-12 may not be amongst the top tier.


... just as some may say a non-turbo Porsche is "no good" either :)


- Andy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for your input/advice.


Now, who knows the best-priced source from which to buy? Please PM me.


Thanks again


--Caleb
 
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