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Anyone have any comets on these two:


Tact: http://www.tactlabs.com/Products/TCS/TCS_Frames.htm


Lexicon: http://www.lexicon.com/products/overview.asp?ID=15


The Lexicon is about $12,999 and I think the TCS is about the same price.


I believe that the Lexicon's EQ goes only up to 250 Hz where as the TCS if full spectrum.


Also I believe that the TCS is touted more as a room correction system where as the Lexicon is more of a high end EQ system.


Any comments? Other advantages or disadvantages of the two?


If you own or have tried just one you comments on it would be appreciated.


In your opinion is the cost worthy of the benefits?



Thanks

Frank
 

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Well, the Lexicon offers Logic7 and is balanced in the MC-12B while the tact appears to mainly be single ended except for the 3 XLR outs it has. I don't know if that is for L/C/R or L/R/LFE.


While there may be people who have heard each system a few times, I doubt there would be anybody here who has owned each system unless they work at a store that has both on display. The Lexicon is pretty new but I don't know how long the TacT has been out.
 

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While almost all rooms benefit from room correction, I would think that the TCS would be especially valuable in irregular, real-world rooms (open areas, L-shapes, etc...). The Lex would be my pick if I had a dedicated room with acoustic treatments. YMMV,


John
 

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No video switching for the Tact and you have to buy a separate analog to digital converter that's designed to work with the TCS if you want to listen to dvd-a or SACD as it has no analog bypass. So really I think the price would be several thousand more to get the same features as the Lex. Tact has a 15 day trial period and sells factory direct.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Bulldogger
No video switching for the Tact and you have to buy a separate analog to digital converter that's designed to work with the TCS if you want to listen to dvd-a or SACD as it has no analog bypass. So really I think the price would be several thousand more to get the same features as the Lex. Tact has a 15 day trial period and sells factory direct.
I can't speak for everyone, but video switching in any high-end processor is something most of us avoid...Especially when paying $12K for a processor. Most (like myself) will take the video either to a scaler or directly to the display. I don't look at that as a oversight or fault in the TACT at all. I just read the review of the TACT, and it would appear to be the piece to have in that price range. I own a Lexicon but would have seriously considered the TACT if I hadn't already been using QSC DSPs for my EQ / correction.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Frank D


I believe that the Lexicon's EQ goes only up to 250 Hz where as the TCS if full spectrum.


Also I believe that the TCS is touted more as a room correction system where as the Lexicon is more of a high end EQ system.

I believe that Lexicon did not go full spectrum on purpose given that higher frequency corrections are more unpredictable and change depending on position due to the shortness of the waves. This is probably done better with room treatments. V4 also deals with decay and not just EQ.


The Tact does look like a nice piece though... but I do use my video switching as my projector does have a nice scalar on board.
 

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I would consider getting a professional to calibrate your room. Treating the room will have a much greater affect on sound than differences between electronics. I always recommend an EQ for subs and it is a nicety if it is available on other channels. Separate EQ's such as Jeff's QSCs' can be used with any preamp which has its advantages. Also, the EQ/ room correction of any of these pieces aren't going to tell you where or what type of acoustic treatments you need for your room, or where to best place your seating/ speakers/ subs.


Frequencies above 250hz are usually more effectively treated with room treatments than EQ. EQ can add phase shifts and other problems and that is why processors have trouble calibrating for higher frequencies because they don't know the room conditions. Meridian also limits their EQ controls to 250hz. I think this is more of a safety factor, probably since there is more of a chance of a user creating a problem rather than correcting one. I would consider a professional calibration, room treatments, parametric EQ for subs and a lesser processor for about the same price as a high end processor. Of couse, if you have the budget than go with the high end prepro as well!


I've heard a demo of the TACT system in a not so ideal environment. When A/Bing between the non room corrected sound and the room corrected sound, the corrected sound did have a noticeable improvement. I always wondered how good it would be in a treated room. I haven't had an opportunity to use one myself.


I've calibrated a system with the MC-12 V4 and will be doing another one in a couple weeks. It is a nice processor. After all the room treatments were installed and had it auto calibrate it did a very good job. Close to what I would have done myself.


Bob
 

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Bob,


I agree, a combination of both electronic and room treatments is probably the best of both worlds, also I believe that V4 on the Lex does EQ the subs as well. The beauty is it does it automatically, set it and forget it.
 

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There is an AVS'r with an all TacT system -> TCS, many TacT digital amps, TacT speakers & subs.


The TCS will communicate with the TacT amps via a digital connection, the TacT amps can be programmed themselves to also perform digital crossover duties, volume control occurs in a unique way by altering the amps voltage rails ( not potentiometers, nor digital attentuation ). There are MANY unique things of an all TacT system as it is all-digital up until the speaker binding posts. COOL !!!


I very recently acquired a TacT RCS 2.0S that I am about to play with in my system.


- Andy
 

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The Bland, my processor has a separate external video switcher which is one reason the designer claims it has such a high signal to noise at 123db. That's one problem I have with the Lexicon MC12, it's internal video switching. I'm just pointing if out because most guys seem to be mainly concerned about convenience. Having to do another analog to digital conversion and then back, for SACD and DVD-A is certainly an audiophile no-no, as well. Again, many don't care and do it because they like the convenience of DSP modes and bass management.
 

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" many don't care and do it because they like the convenience of DSP modes and bass management."


Actually those that do this, and not all do, don't like it for the convenience of processing but for the sound quality benefits of that processing. Since the Lex. lets you compare analog pass through vs. processed it is easy for anyone to try them back to back. SACD/DVD-A sounds better in my system processed then with a straight analog bypass. YMMV of course.


Shawn
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Bulldogger
Having to do another analog to digital conversion and then back, for SACD and DVD-A is certainly an audiophile no-no, as well. Again, many don't care and do it because they like the convenience of DSP modes and bass management.
I listen to DVDA and SACD on my MC12 is straight analog because is does sound a little better to me than digitizing, we will see if that changes when I have my three subs set up and V4 running with room correction.
 

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Well at least both you Shawn and Tom have the option of doing it either way you chose and are not forced into 24/96 dacs for SACD and 24/192 material.
 
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