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The Flat 4K OLEDs that everyone wants aren't coming out until late August-sept, I believe and content won't arrive until the end of the year or next, so it's perfect timing in my opinion. Yeah it sucks for those wanting now if they truly worship HDR. I just hope they make it to the 2015 shootout.
 
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LG OLED is not the only company lagging on HDR. Unfortunately Sony also is back peddling on HDR IMO.
The only confirmed full HDR sets thus far AFAIK are the Samsung JS9500, Panasonic top model and Sharps top model Beyond 4k release date later in 2015. Not sure what Vizio will bring yet, although their info will be forthcoming soon.
 

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I have still hope that LG will announce the possibility to support HDR with an update (Although I know it's a foolish dream^^). If not, they should rather delay all theirs TVs so that they can all display HDR.
 

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Unfortunately no

HDR = Hardware not software
Actually no, it is both. As long as the backlight brightness and panel color gamut (both HW) support the requirements of HDR, the interpretation of the metadata and conversion for proper display through the panel is all SW.

LG OLED certainly has a wide color gamut, and if the OLED panel can truly produce 800 cd/m2 over a 1% window, that should support HDR brightness for highlights, but the real question is what effect that high-brightness output may have on lifetime.

My suspicion is that while LGs OLEDs may be able to support HDR from a pure HW specification point of view, and could possibly be upgraded with SW/FW to interpret and display HDR metadata, they don't yet have an understanding of what this will translate to in terms of product reliability and especially lifetime.

If LG were to release HDR capability and the first time an owner were to display an HDR movie they were to ruin their TVs through burn-in or panel non-uniformity (dead/dim zones), it would be catastrophic. And since there is not yet any real HDR test material available, it is more difficult for LG to assess the impact of HDR on OLED than it is for Samsung and others (including LG) to be confident it will not result in reliability/lifetime problems on LED/LCD...

Expect LG OLED to release HDR capability as slowly as possible and only once it becomes a marketing show-stopper (the difference between possible success and certain failure).

Samsung pulled a rabbit out of a hat and it is still to early to say what it will end up meaning yet...
 

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LG OLED certainly has a wide color gamut, and if the OLED panel can truly produce 800 cd/m2 over a 1% window, that should support HDR brightness for highlights, but the real question is what effect that high-brightness output may have on lifetime.
The effect on lifetime will be tiny. What percentage of your content will use HDR in the next five years? What percentage of scenes of will use HDR? and if only 1% of the pixels are actually at 800 nits, then the impact on lifetime wont be noticeable.

Moreover, the sample images I have seen from Sony indicate that HDR might be used to actually darken the vast majority of a scene. This would help offset any decrease in lifetime due to HDR.

https://pro.sony.com/bbsccms/assets/files/cat/mondisp/articles/HDR_X300_explained.pdf


The only issue I would see with HDR is if it starts showing up in gaming and a publisher misused the extra brightness by putting it into a heads up display or something similar. That would definitely be a problem for OLED's.
 

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So why buy a $10,000 display now? then have to replace it in a years time when HDR becomes the must have buzz-worthy feature, LG must think we're made of money.
 

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So why buy a $10,000 display now? then have to replace it in a years time when HDR becomes the must have buzz-worthy feature, LG must think we're made of money.
There's always something better around the corner. IMO, never spend that much on a TV if the feeling of being outdated in a year bothers you.
 

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There's always something better around the corner. IMO, never spend that much on a TV if the feeling of being outdated in a year bothers you.
For little things, 100% agree. HDR with PQ EOTF may not be such a little thing to many people. Although there are some that think HDR is not that big a deal.
 

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Actually no, it is both. As long as the backlight brightness and panel color gamut (both HW) support the requirements of HDR, the interpretation of the metadata and conversion for proper display through the panel is all SW.

LG OLED certainly has a wide color gamut, and if the OLED panel can truly produce 800 cd/m2 over a 1% window, that should support HDR brightness for highlights, but the real question is what effect that high-brightness output may have on lifetime.

My suspicion is that while LGs OLEDs may be able to support HDR from a pure HW specification point of view, and could possibly be upgraded with SW/FW to interpret and display HDR metadata, they don't yet have an understanding of what this will translate to in terms of product reliability and especially lifetime.

If LG were to release HDR capability and the first time an owner were to display an HDR movie they were to ruin their TVs through burn-in or panel non-uniformity (dead/dim zones), it would be catastrophic. And since there is not yet any real HDR test material available, it is more difficult for LG to assess the impact of HDR on OLED than it is for Samsung and others (including LG) to be confident it will not result in reliability/lifetime problems on LED/LCD...

Expect LG OLED to release HDR capability as slowly as possible and only once it becomes a marketing show-stopper (the difference between possible success and certain failure).

Samsung pulled a rabbit out of a hat and it is still to early to say what it will end up meaning yet...


pure conjecture on my part, I think original plan was HDR firmware update to current sets (but they worried bout durability as you say), and the 800 cd/m^2 brighter and more durable phosphors were planned to be a 2016 thing. Yes flatpanels said 800nits, but they were talking to engineer. We tend to think future product instead of current product ;)

In a way this could be a good thing that they are trying to pull it ahead due to Samsung's rabbit trick. Even better would be if they expanded color gamut too with new phosphors.


Biggest worry I have is LGs track record of hitting promised release dates. If it wasn't for track record "Sept" wouldn't seem so bad.:(
 

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So why buy a $10,000 display now?.
Because that $10k tv will be better than any tv available now, HDR or not & won't have the need to replace in a years time.
 

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I would really be pissed if I purchased the EG9600 with no HDR FW update only for the EF9500 end of the year to offer that. Problem is that LG doesn't let us know what will happen. If the EF9500 didn't have HDR either I could as well buy the EG9600 much earlier as long as the curve doesn't bother me. Wouldn't surprise me if none of the 2015 OLEDs supported HDR.
 

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My general question to anyone worried about true HDR future proofing: What TV out currently supports the 1000 nit requirements? And why not just go buy that one?
 
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