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I was just wanting to know if this meter I own can get me to a calibrated picture + 3DLUT on my new 77CX, or if I need a different meter.
Again, if you check out the thread that relates to the software you are using you would see that all users of CalMAN Home are using an i1d3 as their probe. The Home version of the software doesn’t support anything more than consumer level meters, and the i1d3 is regarded as the best consumer level meter there is. Anything more than that will be software related so you would get more responses to your questions in the threads that relate to the software you are using
 

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LG White Balance Pre-Calibration using Service Menu

The White Balance in Service Menu has three presets for White balance (Cool - Medium - Warm).

In contrast, the TV regular OSD menu has six color temp selections.

During the LG factory Quality Control process, they will calibrate the White Balance of the panel using an LG software.

It's an automatic calibration procedure since LG software communicates with the TV. It will apply the adjustments based on the readings it will take.

The software will display an 80 IRE full-field pattern and will perform the panel calibration.

These adjustments are directly affecting the panel to count for pane-per-panel variations, before the calibration controls of the regular TV menu.

LG has defined specific coordinates for each color temperature, to make it simple, 6500K for 'Warm', 9300K for 'Medium' and 11000K for 'Cool'.

White Balance settings of 'Warm' in Service Menu will affect the 'Warm 1, Warm 2, and Warm 3' preset of regular TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Medium' in Service Menu will affect the 'Medium and Warm 1' preset of Normal TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Cool' in Service Menu will affect the 'Cool' preset of Normal TV Menu.

For SM WB, I recommend the users to use:

SM Cool for pre-calibrating the 109% White for SDR (with SDR pattern) and select Cool in the regular TV menu.

SM Warm for pre-calibrating for 100% White (with HDR pattern) and select Warm 2 on the regular TV menu.

We don't want the adjustments of color temp preset to affect a different color temp calibration.



For White Balance calibration using Service Menu, there is a setting 'Test Pattern' with '100IRE', '80IRE' and 'OFF' as options.

The 'IRE' selections will display an internal generated full-field pattern.

These patterns will bypass a lot of signal processing steps.

We don't want this to happen; for that reason, select 'OFF' and use a 109% SDR White pattern with 11% window size generated from your HDMI input from my calibration disk you are using, for example.

When the RGB Gain has values of 192.192.192, it will provide the panel's maximum dynamic range. (RGB Cut 64.64.64 are the default values)

LG in the factory, but users also have to keep the Red Gain @ 192 (to keep max dynamic range) and then reduce only values from G Gain and B Gain to calibrate the RGB balance.



Note: don't press the RESET button to the White Balance menu in Service Menu.

After the WB calibration during factory pre-calibration, the system will send an OK value that the WB calibration has performed.

LG's QC technician will see that White Balance has performed when he looks at the initial service menu screen. See the left side of the following picture where it says ''Adjust White Balance: OK'':



When the user presses 'RESET' to the SM WB menu, it will delete the calibration values stored from the factory for his panel.

A warning with red letters (right side of the picture) will appear, which will say ''Adjust White Balance: NG'' (aka NOT GOOD).

Looking at the left side of the picture, its how the TV should look when someone hasn't pressed 'RESET', after performing manual cal of SM WB (or before any manual SM WB adjustment).

LG is still incorrectly naming the RGB Balance controls as 'IRE', a term which means the ''voltage of the signal in the analog world'', as used in CRT's before 20 years.

TVs, in digital world signaling, have to use '%' or 'code values' for grayscale steps, nor IRE.

When you perform 'basic' pre-calibration from the SM WB menu, it will require fewer adjustments from regular 'multi-point' TV menus later.

While the picture will look better, the required time for the calibration will be shorter.

The regular TV menu has many calibration controls and settings.

When you change all these controls, an LG processing unit with combine all your setting values to and it will calculate a global correction for the TV.

SM Panel calibration + global correction of regular TV Menus will manipulate the signal before it enters the RGB-> WRGB processing unit -> Panel.

LG's controls for manual cal can add artifacts or degrade pictures (even with Luminance controls in RGB Balance) because the algorithm is very complicated.

The additional processing can bring some out-of-valid-range adjustments and can affect the picture.

It's the reason we suggest to users to not use Luminance controls in 20-Point RGB-Balance controls and CMS to some sets.

The problems will appear with real movie evaluation, or when the users will perform an evaluation using static color ramps or gradation patterns of my calibration disk.

The two-color reproduction ramps are useful for quick evaluation.

So after a lot of testing, doing Service Menu White Balance is the best method to pre-calibrate the display before the profiling or before starting a manual calibration using the available calibration controls from the regular TV menu.

It will provide a cleaner picture with smoother gradations.

After the SM WB calibration, the users can continue with multi-point RGB balance calibration from the regular TV menu (skipping the 2-Point RGB balance of regular TV menu).

When you are not calibrating SM WB and using a 2-Point RGB balance of regular menu (or multi-point), this can make the internal processing algorithm more complex.

For example, the SM WB can remove Green while your regular TV menu to add Green.

Two settings which perform similar kind of adjustment have different values, and this fact will add complexity and unnecessary additional processing to the signal manipulator.

The side-effects can be noticed during the evaluation of gradation.

It's a better solution to use a 2-Point RGB balance from one White Balance menu and not apply the same adjustments from both menus (regular TV menu + SM) simultaneously.
 

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LG OLEDs Dimming Issues

LG has released a new firmware to resolve the reported dimming issues for 2018/2019/2020 OLED TVs.

There is a new setting in the IN-START service menu, to the same page where you disable the TCP.

Its called "GSR: Enable".

By disabling that GSR function, from IN-START in SM, it will disable completely any dimming functions of LG.

That new setting will be available to 2018/2019/2020 TVs after the latest FW updates.

Some countries will not get the automatic update notification, so it will require to access your local LG site to download and manually update the TV.

I believe that it's disabling the two functions for fixed pixel detection.

LG's have two detection processing functions:

Fixed image region detection unit + Fixed image determination unit.

These functions will alter the WRGB values (reducing the driving of subpixels and increasing the W subpixel slightly usually), and this will affect the luminance.

The algorithm counts to make that change as not so be noticeable to the observer.

However, many users can detect that side-effect, it can notice the luminance reduction.

When you have TCP: 0, it will reduce some of these functions, but it will not eliminate all dimming functions.

GSR OFF will disable any of such dimming functions altogether.

I think LG released that setting for not letting Panasonic HZ2000 (not the consumer model, but a particular model thru broadcast retailer) to not have that function as exclusive.

The primary purpose of this fix is for people in post-production where they use LGs as clients view SDR, which was a known issue to colorist channels.
 

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LG OLEDs Dimming Issues

LG has released a new firmware to resolve the reported dimming issues for 2018/2019/2020 OLED TVs.

There is a new setting in the IN-START service menu, to the same page where you disable the TCP.

Its called "GSR: Enable".

By disabling that GSR function, from IN-START in SM, it will disable completely any dimming functions of LG.

That new setting will be available to 2018/2019/2020 TVs after the latest FW updates.

Some countries will not get the automatic update notification, so it will require to access your local LG site to download and manually update the TV.

I believe that it's disabling the two functions for fixed pixel detection.

LG's have two detection processing functions:

Fixed image region detection unit + Fixed image determination unit.

These functions will alter the WRGB values (reducing the driving of subpixels and increasing the W subpixel slightly usually), and this will affect the luminance.

The algorithm counts to make that change as not so be noticeable to the observer.

However, many users can detect that side-effect, it can notice the luminance reduction.

When you have TCP: 0, it will reduce some of these functions, but it will not eliminate all dimming functions.

GSR OFF will disable any of such dimming functions altogether.

I think LG released that setting for not letting Panasonic HZ2000 (not the consumer model, but a particular model thru broadcast retailer) to not have that function as exclusive.

The primary purpose of this fix is for people in post-production where they use LGs as clients view SDR, which was a known issue to colorist channels.
I wonder if it would help turning GSR Off during calibration when calibrating a brighter Day PM? I'll have to try it.
 

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John, I don't think it would be of any use as long as you use stabilisation patch during calibration.
 
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LG White Balance Pre-Calibration using Service Menu



LG in the factory, but users also have to keep the Red Gain @ 192 (to keep max dynamic range) and then reduce only values from G Gain and B Gain to calibrate the RGB balance.



Ted
The Red Gain 192 in the text does not correspond to the picture below. Is it Red or Green that should be kept at 192?
 

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OK! Thanks Ted
 
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Would you not recommend the average consumer to turn off GSR? Does GSR only affect SDR? It would drive the panel harder?
 

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Personally, I would disable GSR only when playing video games (I don't play them) and when watching movies broadcasted on TV channels with logos (I don't watch TV channels at all).
 

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Personally, I would disable GSR only when playing video games (I don't play them) and when watching movies broadcasted on TV channels with logos (I don't watch TV channels at all).
thanks for the sarcasm.
 

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Forum user @jk82 discovered what GSR in the service menu did within hours of the FW release that added it to the 2018 LG OLED's. He documented it in this post here which was a continuation of his tests in this post here.

If none of what is described in those posts is affecting you, then IMO there is no need to disable it. FWIW, I have never noticed any of the ANSD (as named in that thread) on my C9, and I have no need to disable it.
 

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Would you not recommend the average consumer to turn off GSR? Does GSR only affect SDR? It would drive the panel harder?
Generally, all kinds of ABL and dimming functions are affecting and altering the preserved picture.

Reference Grade-1 monitor doesn't suffer from such Dimming and ABL limitations.

These LGs have no ABL until ~150 nits when you display full-field patterns.

However, with real content, you can notice a dimming, at least some users have seen, we can say.

Even if the content has lower nits, even 30-80 nits, it will have auto-dimming enabled when the content will have fixed pixels.

When you see the dimming the first time, it will be easier to notice it the next time.

Some more expert consumers have performed testing using colorimeters; it can dim down to 30-40% the picture (or more):



TV companies enable many functions to prevent issues, for having fewer problems to repair centers, or calls from customers, emails, etc.

It's the reason when you buy the TV, it has many functions as ECO enabled, or sensors for room light, enabled, as regular users are not calibrating the TVs.

These internal LUT functions added basically for professional market customers as its still not available large screens with internal LUTs capabilities in the professional market.

Big screens required for many different applications, including editing, VFX, and client view, so LG came with these internal LUT capabilities to give these professional customers solutions.

That function to disable the dimming introduced for professional customers.

When you disable that function, you can say that you disable the processing functions to protect basically from image retention, it can affect power consumption or panel temperature.

I will have dimming disabled forever, and now it's working like a dream TV for the home movie enthusiast.

Its a feature we are waiting for years. It will be rare to watch the same movie two times, at least to watch it one time but to have as best as possible video playback experience.

But if the TV is working 10 hours a day, to watch TV stations or for games (where they have fixed GUI) or for desktop monitor screen, I believe it should be disabled.

Or you can enable it when you want to watch your movie.

Some users haven't noticed that dimming.

In that case, they can try to enable/disable and focus if they can see any difference.
 

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thanks for the sarcasm.
Sorry, didn't mean to be sarcastic. I just mean that I wouldn't disable GSR because I don't watch content with logo or HUD or fixed images. But if I did, I would surely disable it, taking all other precautions to avoid burn in.
 

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Sorry, didn't mean to be sarcastic. I just mean that I wouldn't disable GSR because I don't watch content with logo or HUD or fixed images. But if I did, I would surely disable it, taking all other precautions to avoid burn in.
The way you need to look at it is these mechanisms are there to protect the panel so disabling them permanently may not be a good idea depending on how you use the set.
 

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I agree with you John, that's why I said that I would take all other possible actions to avoid permanent screen burn. ;)
 
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Note: don't press the RESET button to the White Balance menu in Service Menu.

After the WB calibration during factory pre-calibration, the system will send an OK value that the WB calibration has performed.

LG's QC technician will see that White Balance has performed when he looks at the initial service menu screen. See the left side of the following picture where it says ''Adjust White Balance: OK'':



When the user presses 'RESET' to the SM WB menu, it will delete the calibration values stored from the factory for his panel.

A warning with red letters (right side of the picture) will appear, which will say ''Adjust White Balance: NG'' (aka NOT GOOD).
Say someone were to accidentally hit that reset. I'm assuming there's no way to get the factory calibration values back...right? I'm guessing this is "bad" and has negative impacts.
 

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Say someone were to accidentally hit that reset. I'm assuming there's no way to get the factory calibration values back...right?
You copy them back in, from the photos that you definitely took, or the numbers you definitely wrote down, before you touched anything... ;)

Failing that, yes those factory values are gone forever. You would then need a meter to do your own calibration to put anything sensible in there.
 

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You copy them back in, from the photos that you definitely took, or the numbers you definitely wrote down, before you touched anything... ;)

Failing that, yes those factory values are gone forever. You would then need a meter to do your own calibration to put anything sensible in there.
I'm neither confirming or denying that I could have stupidly hit that when I was doing my original SM white balance calibration. I'm not sure I kept the document I had the original values in, either. Um. Oops. Regardless, I was measuring it to correct white balance anyway, so what I have in there now is better than was it came with IMO.
 
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