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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having to replace my Sony KDF-60WF655 rear projection television after five years. After reading a number of posts here, that seems not an atypical lifespan.


Are there different life expectancies for the various display technologies, e.g., LCD, LED, Plasma?


In general, what should I look for to try to get longer life out of my next large screen TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Graham /forum/post/18166072


I am having to replace my Sony KDF-60WF655 rear projection television after five years. After reading a number of posts here, that seems not an atypical lifespan.


Are there different life expectancies for the various display technologies, e.g., LCD, LED, Plasma?


In general, what should I look for to try to get longer life out of my next large screen TV?

My opinion: it is too early to tell. There are certainly a larger number of early failures with LCD TV than with matured CRT technology. Most smaller LCD monitor screens are still going strong. The large LCD TVs (I will call "large" anything greater than 46") simply haven't been around long enough and in enough numbers to give a true indication of longevity.


First Note: Wiki has this to say: "By late 2006, several vendors were offering 42" LCDs, albeit at a price premium, encroaching on plasma's only stronghold."


Like I said: the >46" LCD screen size has not been around long enough and in big enough numbers. 2006-2008 were the "ramp up" years for larger screens. The technology was new and I am not sure you can judge today's sets by those sets. 2009 really was the year that the 52" and 55" sectors took off, so we won't know for 5 or 10 MORE years how good they are.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewhite79 /forum/post/18166187


Its just my opinion, but ANY TV should last ten years, regardless of technology.

My 32 inch RCA lasted 11 years on the dot, Flawless picture till the day it died., Day after the SuperBowl, she lasted just long enough, the next day Poof bang pop.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold /forum/post/18166506


My 32 inch RCA lasted 11 years on the dot, Flawless picture till the day it died., Day after the SuperBowl, she lasted just long enough, the next day Poof bang pop.

I have a 36" CRT that is 10 years old right now. flawless picture and looks great. The 32" before that is from 1993 or so. With only 1 $80.00 fix it is still working 100% and is in a nephews bedroom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I also have a 36" CRT that is still working fine after maybe 16 years. But the display on my 60" LCD has a blue blob overlay that is growing, now to about 15% of the picture area. Apparently, something like the LCD layer is peeling.


I was told that it would cost over $1000 to fix and that would be unwise.


In general, I was shocked to learn on here that five years is a typical lifespan for large screen displays.
 

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as others have Said Large sized LCD's have not been around long enough to have proven themselves


lifespan will also vary from manufacture and model to manufacture and model.


many 2+ year old Sony and most notably samsung LCD TV's have had lots of failures in the same area, for the sony's it was tab bonds on the panel coming apart causing a very very bad picture and the samsung were even more common and it was capacitors on the power supply failing


we would like to think that the current LCD's will last a long time but its really hard to tell because the tech at this size is so young


Plasma has a longer record and Panasonic's at least have been shown to last a very long time


GRRR the fourm will not let me link the source of this quote but anyways just google lifespan of a plasma and its the first result that comes up

Quote:
So how long will a plasma last? The long and short of it is that it depends upon your daily hourly usage as well as how you use the monitor. 12 to 55 years is my new short answer.


One practical example I will cite here is the Panasonic Tau units being used by video rental company, In Motion Pictures at major airports around the country. Most of the earlier Tau models have now been replaced by a newer model, but these plasma displays were used for 5 years and were the first generation of plasma displays to go a considerable distance. In Motion displays images on them from 6AM until 10PM daily (16 hours). By my estimates, these early plasma displays by Panasonic were in use by In Motion for around 30,000 hours or more. They never fail to catch my eye as I pass by in one airport or another to see if they are still in use. If they have lost some of their brightness level its hard to tell. This use equates to 18 years for a home owner that watches 3 hours television per day.


And this is the old model!

It's worth noting that those were commercial models being used so they are build to last longer than consumer models but still none the less the actual panel tech used today in Panasonic plasma has been improved even more and Panasonic is claiming 100,000 hours on their current plasmas


LCD is definitely much more easy to accidentally break than plasma as well, the Thin glass used in LCD panels is very easy to crack where as the glass panasonic uses on their plasmas is very resistant to breaking as evidenced by this video, an LCD would never survive that test

 

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Right now I'd have to agree with Obeck--it's really too early to tell if any of the flat panel technologies will last 10-15 years like those 80s-90s crt sets did. A lot of the old crt based rear projection sets lasted a similarly long time if not run in torch mode, I personally know of one 11 year old Hitachi and a 9 year old Sony that have never required any repairs and are still going strong.


If a gun were held to my head and I had to make a recommendation I'd go for a Panasonic for plasma and a Sony or Sharp for LCD, based on my conversations with a Sears service tech.


I think, as in the past, using sensible settings instead of "torch" mode could easily extend the life of plasma panels and lcd backlights, as well as such components as power supply boards etc.


Plasma makers claim a 100,000 hr "half-life" for their panels, meaning it take 100,000 hrs to lose half it's original brightness. The most common figure I see for CCFL backlights on LCDs is 50-60k hrs half-life, LED should theoretically go longer but I haven't seen any claims for them. Usually something else will go bad before a panel or backlight fails.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S /forum/post/18167391


Right now I'd have to agree with Obeck--it's really too early to tell if any of the flat panel technologies will last 10-15 years like those 80s-90s crt sets did. A lot of the old crt based rear projection sets lasted a similarly long time if not run in torch mode, I personally know of one 11 year old Hitachi and a 9 year old Sony that have never required any repairs and are still going strong.


If a gun were held to my head and I had to make a recommendation I'd go for a Panasonic for plasma and a Sony or Sharp for LCD, based on my conversations with a Sears service tech.


I think, as in the past, using sensible settings instead of "torch" mode could easily extend the life of plasma panels and lcd backlights, as well as such components as power supply boards etc.


Plasma makers claim a 100,000 hr "half-life" for their panels, meaning it take 100,000 hrs to lose half it's original brightness. The most common figure I see for CCFL backlights on LCDs is 50-60k hrs half-life, LED should theoretically go longer but I haven't seen any claims for them. Usually something else will go bad before a panel or backlight fails.

+1 Agree 100%


LCD's theoretically can last forever at the screen level but the backlight and other components are what often fail, tab bond issues a likely a thing of the past but it has been a common problem with samsung made panels in Mitsubishi and Sony sets made just a few years ago.


build quality really is a major factor though in LCD life, i have a Samsung PC monitor that is about 7 years old now and it works great still, while i have a Viewsonic monitor that had capacitors go bad in its power supply after just 3 years of use. fortunately it was an easy fix but still, just goes to show that build quality matters more than anything really
 

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Consumer Reports has over 4,000,000 subscribers.


"LCD and Plasma TVs continue to build a solid track record for reliability. Only 3% on average needed repair or had a serious problem during their first few years of use. That's what readers told us about 118,700 LCD TVs and 40,072 plasma TVs purchased between 2006 and the first half of 2009.


"LCD brands with comparably low repair rates (in alphabetical order) were Hitachi, JVC, LG, Magnavox, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung, Sanyo, Sharp, Sony, Sylvania, Toshiba, and Vizio."


"Indications are that problems arise early if at all: 73% of repairs were on TVs no more than one year old. Also reasurring: Our data show that even for sets five to six years old, the overall repair rate has been relatively low, about 10%. (Models in a brand can vary, and design or manufacture changes might affect future reliability.)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewhite79 /forum/post/18166187


Its just my opinion, but ANY TV should last ten years, regardless of technology.

Yet as the OP's comment and my own experience show (sony 60kdf955sx that lasted just over 5 years before the optical block went bad) they do not. Kind of renders your opinion meritless in my opinion. While one can hope that they will last at least 10 years, they obviously do not.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hibeta /forum/post/18175039


Yet as the OP's comment and my own experience show (60kds955sx that lasted just over 5 years before the optical block went bad) they do not. Kind of renders your opinion meritless in my opinion. While one can hope that they will last at least 10 years, they obviously do not.

those rear projection sets are notorious for breaking down


in fact the only RPTV sets that last a long time are CRT RPTV's i have a Phillips 46" 1080i CRT RPTV that is 6 years old and still works but it has 4:3 pillar burn in and bad coolant in the blue tube making the picture bad with dark images (blue halos around objects)


CRT's are analog devices and will function even when components have failed or are failing in many cases


Digitally based displays like LCD, Plasma, LCD/LCoS/DLP RPTV's will often fail catastrophically if something goes wrong no matter how small the single component is that fails. this is easily the biggest reason why CRT is so reliable but is also the same reason why old CRT's often have terrible pictures and need major maintenance done to get them back to having an optimal picture
 

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^^^CRTs are kinda like Chevys were back in the 50s and 60s--they ran pretty good no matter what was wrong with 'em.


We probably aren't going back to that kind of reliability on tvs any more than we could go back to cars that don't require more computer power than it took to get us to the moon back in 1969.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S /forum/post/18175721


^^^CRTs are kinda like Chevys were back in the 50s and 60s--they ran pretty good no matter what was wrong with 'em.


We probably aren't going back to that kind of reliability on tvs any more than we could go back to cars that don't require more computer power than it took to get us to the moon back in 1969.

yeah i agree, very good analogy
 

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I think it is possible to make very durable TVs, monitors and cars when technology matures, but does these companies who make these items really want that? Ie. electric motors are more durable than combustion engines that we use right now. Display technologies based on durable light sources and panel materials are coming on the future or at least they will be cheap, easily recycled and reused. Have faith



CRT:s were damn durable, I have one 14" monitor that is at least 16 years old and still in allmost mint condition
and I know many monochrome monitors that have lasted more than 25 years without any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by frito /forum/post/18167316


lifespan will also vary from manufacture and model to manufacture and model.

I greatly appreciate this discussion. If I could re-up my main question -- Is there a way to reduce the risk of this happening again (a fairly short life span)? Perhaps not.


I feel compelled to do some research before plunking down another $2500 or so.
 

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The best way to measure life is by hours not years. Current premium sets may be good for up to 100,000 hours if the owner gets lucky and no small component fails. I think that the best current tech (which I predict will turn out to be LED LCD) should be the first that will rival the last and best of the CRTs in terms of reliability.


BTW it's a myth that CRTs were always reliable. While some people have stories of plugging in one and it ran for 20 years, TV repair shops have had lots of work to do over the years. The difference was that in those days we didn't have Internet newsgroups and forums for the problems to be reported (and unfortunately sometimes made to look far more serious than they probably are).
 

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^^^Just about everyone, myself included, has a story about a crt set that lasted forever (in my case an '86 model Sony KV25XBR that has only needed one repair for a faulty tuner and still works very well). In the vast majority of these we're talking about a set purchased sometime before the mid-90s when it was common for a 27" Sony, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, RCA, etc. to cost upwards of $750 and a 32" model to be 1200 or more.


A few years later downward price pressure severely hurt reliability on the old crt sets--lots of early to mid 2000s sets are dying like flies.


It should also be remembered that though the color and contrast ratio on them was usually excellent they almost all suffered from less than perfect geometry--a truly straight line on most consumer crt sets was a rarity without careful calibration.


As for the question of how to extend the life of a new set it's still pretty much the same as always--avoid torch mode, avoid frequent on-off cycles, avoid excessive humidity or temperature extremes in the room where the set is in use, and make sure the set has adequate ventilation space around it.
 
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