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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The purpose of this thread is to list all current and upcoming models of displays which feature at least one of the following features...XDR, HDR, and/or WCG. For the purposes of this thread we will use the following definitions and criteria for these three terms...

XDR - Extended/Extrapolated Dynamic Range. In order to qualify, the display must have some form of in-house/third party processing algorithm which is used is increase the dynamic range (the difference between the darkest and lightest parts of the image) and provide improved detail in both dark shadows and brightly-lit areas of the video content. The display must be capable of producing a full screen white peak brightness of at least 200 Nits and specular highlights of at least 400 Nits. XDR is used to increase the dynamic range of content that was graded on/for "standard" dynamic range displays (i.e. BT 709). For this reason, some would call it "fake" HDR.

HDR - High Dynamic Range. In order to qualify, the display must be capable of reading and reproducing HDR-graded content without artificially increasing the brightness of the content and without clipping the grayscale on either end of the spectrum. As there are competing standards for HDR, some of which specify a minimum bit depth of 10 bits per primary, while others seem to want to stick with 8 bits per primary, I don't know that we can restrict this to only those displays that are 10-bit end to end. Once a standard is agreed upon, we may want to revisit this list to eliminate any displays that do not meet the requirements of the accepted standard(s). For now, I suggest we go with a full screen peak white of at least 200 Nits and specular highlights of at least 400 Nits requirement to qualify (same as XDR). The primary difference between HDR and XDR is that with HDR, you are theoretically seeing the content as the director/color gradist intended as the display is merely showing the content as it was encoded, without extrapolation.

WCG - Wide Color Gamut. For the purposes of this list, the display in question must be capable of reproducing a minimum of 90% of the DCI P3 color space. It must also be able to accept content encoded as Rec. 2020, though it is not required to be able to reproduce every color in the Rec. 2020 color space.

2014 XDR/HDR/WCG displays

Sony XBR-55X900B/65X900B
XDR - Yes (X-Tended Dynamic Range)
HDR - No
WCG - DCI coverage is unknown. Uses Sony's proprietary Triluminos color technology, which supports xvYCC color space.
Panel Type: VA (flat)
Backlight Type: Edge-lit, pseudo local dimming
Native Resolution: 3840x2160
HDMI version - 2.0 level B (support for 2160p @ 60 fps is limited to 8-bit, 4:2:0)
HDCP 2.2 - Yes on one input

Sony XBR-79X900B
XDR - Yes (X-Tended Dynamic Range)
HDR - No
WCG - DCI coverage is unknown. Uses Sony's proprietary Triluminos color technology, which supports xvYCC color space.
Panel Type: IPS (flat)
Backlight Type: Edge-lit, pseudo local dimming
Native Resolution: 3840x2160
HDMI version - 2.0 level B (support for 2160p @ 60 fps is limited to 8-bit, 4:2:0)
HDCP 2.2 - Yes on one input

Sony XBR-65X950B/85X950B
XDR - Yes (X-Tended Dynamic Range Pro)
HDR - No
WCG - DCI coverage is unknown. Uses Sony's proprietary Triluminos color technology, which supports xvYCC color space.
Panel Type: VA (flat)
Backlight Type: FALD
Native Resolution: 3840x2160
HDMI version - 2.0 level B (support for 2160p @ 60 fps is limited to 8-bit, 4:2:0)
HDCP 2.2 - Yes on two inputs

2015 XDR/HDR/WCG displays

...work in progress...
 
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