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I hope Im not repeating an old thread, but I looked and couldnt find anything. I would like to use this thread to compile a short list of really well engineered and recorded CD's, as well as some poorly recorded ones. Basically I need some new musical sources of other genres other than what I have in my library. I will be receiving the last part of my system upgrade and I want some diverse music sources to show it off and to also listen to for myself.


Despite listening to classical music on a daily basis, I only own maybe 1 or 2 classical CD's that really arent mastered that well. Can anyone suggest a few, very well recorded, classsical CD's? Perhaps some Jazz as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffypuck  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_23190657


I hope Im not repeating an old thread, but I looked and couldnt find anything. I would like to use this thread to compile a short list of really well engineered and recorded CD's, as well as some poorly recorded ones. Basically I need some new musical sources of other genres other than what I have in my library. I will be receiving the last part of my system upgrade and I want some diverse music sources to show it off and to also listen to for myself.


Despite listening to classical music on a daily basis, I only own maybe 1 or 2 classical CD's that really arent mastered that well. Can anyone suggest a few, very well recorded, classsical CD's? Perhaps some Jazz as well.

Yes, you are repeating an existing thread.


http://www.avsforum.com/t/1030712/what-is-your-reference-cd-or-sacd
 

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I recommend the Pieter Wispelwey Bach recordings,both the old and the new one,very well recorded.


for Jazz I'd recommend the High End Downloads from the Amsterdam label Sound Liaison

. I.

here is the review that led me to those recordings,just posted it on another topic as well.
Quote:
I've been among the prophets saying that high-resolution downloads are the future of audiophile music sales. Surely it will benefit the majors to make high-quality downloads a first choice rather than an MP3 extra, but I believe that individual artists can benefit as well. Most new-to-the-scene performers have little money for middlemen and disc manufacture, yet can get things together for the Internet.


Frans de Rond and Peter Bjørnild have taken this approach with Sound Liaison, producing recordings available only in 24-bit/96kHz downloads that mirror the master recording. And man, are they ever sweet. I've seldom heard recordings that were so successful in both performance and sound aspects.


De Rond hails from the Netherlands, where he studied double bass at The Royal Conservatory in The Hague while concurrently studying recording techniques. Bjørnild also studied double bass, moving to the Netherlands to continue studies at The Hague. Since graduating, he has played almost every type of music, from classical to jazz. Together de Rond and Bjørnild bring two pairs of golden ears to their label. Bjørnild claims that, "a recording should be as realistic and beautiful sounding as possible. As if, when closing your eyes, you find yourself in the best seat in the hall."


The partners discovered a fine recording hall (Studio-Eleven, Hilversum) and set out to record amazing musicians in this great acoustic place in front of live audiences. It's a daring feat; one take and no place to hide, but the abilities of the musicians involved make it seem easy. I chose to talk about the first album by Carmen Gomes Inc. It was a tough choice because all of the three current albums were worthy of review.


Carmen Gomes has won many awards in the Netherlands and surrounding areas. Like so many new European singers, she sings in English -- excellent English, I might add. She's formed a group called Carmen Gomes Inc., with Folker Tettero on guitar, Peter Bjørnild on double bass, and Marcel van Engelen on drums. Her style is bluesy and intimate with a sexy voice that's sweet as dark tupelo honey, and her interpretations are unerring. The musicians play to her and to each other, and the ensemble is so tight that the four musicians breathe and move as one.


There are some standards on the set that knocked me over with their fresh approach. Any singer can misplace a few accents and rhythms and come up with something that's original, but perhaps also uneasy and a little strange. Not Gomes, who has taken the songs to their bones and then restructured them to suit her style. Thus "Fever" doesn't sound like a cover of Peggy Lee; it sounds like a brand new take on a familiar song. You emerge from hearing it not thinking it's better or lesser than Lee's version, but that it's a valid new interpretation that could have come first.


The same approach works on "Angel Eyes," "You Don't Know What Love Is," and "I'm on Fire." Most of the rest, including the title song, "Oblivion," "Time Will Tell," "Gasoa Blue," and "The Sea," are Gomes originals that fit right in with the standards. The recording achieves exactly what Bjørnild set out as his goal. It can provide the best seat in your listening room. Go to the Sound Liaison site, listen to a few samples, download an album, and see if you don't agree that this intimate effort is one of the best and best-sounding jazz vocal albums to come along in many a day. By the way, the small audience applauds enthusiastically enough after the last chords of a song die away, but the attendees never interrupt or make themselves known while a song is going on. No doubt they were completely mesmerized into silence, as was I.


Be sure to listen to: On "Dock of the Bay," Gomes creates a languid, bluesy version that is a little bit reminiscent of Bobbie Gentry while still coming across as quite original. It'll cast a spell over you.


. . . Rad Bennett
 

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Virtually ANY of the old Mercury Living Presence classical recordings from the 1960s and late 1950s are excellent.


They are available on CD and most are also on SACD.


Also, ANYTHING from the OPUS 3 label is a 10 on anybody's scale; marvelous stuff. May Audio is the US distributor. These were made in Sweden by an engineering team that were fanatics about using the finest acoustical spaces and microphones. The recordings are stunning.


Also, almost anything on the DELOS label is excellent. The Engineer's Choice I and II CD.s are collections of classical tracks engineered by John Eargle, who is one of the best. Delos 4001 (Joe Williams, Nothin but the Blues), which was made in the early 1980s, is very good. While all the other recording companies were using the inferior Sony digital recording gear in the early days and cranking out crap, DELOS used the SOUNDSTREAM system and made some very nice recordings.


The recordings RCA made in the late 1950s and 1960s with the Chicago Symphony under Reiner are also excellent. Many of the early Living Stereo RCA recordings are very good.


Anything on the Reference Recordings label is excellent.


Check out the Music Direct catalog for a lot of the better stuff, especially the SACDs.


Oh...and THE best classical recording you will ever hear...lol-the Beethoven Symphony #9 recording on the ARTS label (# 47248) by Peter Maag directing the Orchestre di Padova y Del Veneto. You haven't heard the 9th until you hear THIS!!!! ( I have heard it live several times, and never enjoyed it as much as this recording; acoustical problems tend to make staging it very difficult).



For jazz, the OPUS 3 recordings, and the Jazz at the Pawnshop recording, which is amazing.


Most of the albums on Concord Jazz are very well-recorded and mastered.



Some of the Worst classical recordings I own are on Telarc (although I have some very good Telarc recordings too). The engineers who did some of the duds should be banned.
 

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I'm not sure if anyone is still following but The Eagles hotel California is one of my best sounding SACD's. Also most anything that was originally done at Abbey Road tends to stand up to the test of time, if the original was well dome the remastering process can be made easier and they tend to come out better IMO.
 

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Reference Recording.

Copland: Fanfare For The Common Man, Symphony #3

Bolero! - Orchestral Fireworks

Keith Lockhart conducting the Utah Symphony

in Symphonic Dances


Sheffield Labs:

Heartbeat Drummers of Japan

Harry James & His Big Band

James Newton Howard & Friends


Mobile Fidelity:

Holst The Planets


Mercury Living Presence Stereo:

1812: Tchaikovsky Festival Overture, Op. 49 / Wellington's Victory: Beethoven Battle Symphony, Op. 91 - one of my favorite versions of 1812, there are two MLP recordings, the Reiner version doesn't have the cannons



Just a few of my favorite
 

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Wow there are so many I could mention but I'll mention the ones I use for testing my gear.


Pink Floyd-The Final Cut. Good dynamic range, very "warm" sound.


David Gilmour-David Gilmour. Just good over all sound.


The Beatles-Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band. Just a great sounding album, considering when it was made.


Metallica- Ride the Lighting. A good example of a "loud" album that has dynamic range.


There's countless others but that's the ones I use to show off my gear.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_24243676


You may try releases from this http://www.dtrmusic.com/ place. They all were recorded with just two microphones and minimal mastering.

Why would that sound good? It's much harder to get an album to sound good with just two microphones, when Pink Floyd started to sound really good they were using 48 channel mixers and 24-track reel-to-reel recorders! Hell The Beatles had 4-track recorders, in the 60's! I don't get the whole obsession with purposelessly using less mics than what's needed, listen to DSOTM then listen to the Wall and notice how much better vocals and drums fit in the mix.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bralas  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24251212


Not classical, but many audiophiles luv anything released by Steely Dan. 


A  great example would be: 'Two Against Nature'



Agreed, his music has always sounded great.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbeam418  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24250992


Wow there are so many I could mention but I'll mention the ones I use for testing my gear.


Pink Floyd-The Final Cut. Good dynamic range, very "warm" sound.


David Gilmour-David Gilmour. Just good over all sound.


The Beatles-Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band. Just a great sounding album, considering when it was made.


Metallica- Ride the Lighting. A good example of a "loud" album that has dynamic range.


There's countless others but that's the ones I use to show off my gear.



I own all those you listed and your right on the money
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbeam418  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_24251057

Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_24243676


You may try releases from this http://www.dtrmusic.com/ place. They all were recorded with just two microphones and minimal mastering.

Why would that sound good? It's much harder to get an album to sound good with just two microphones, when Pink Floyd started to sound really good they were using 48 channel mixers and 24-track reel-to-reel recorders! Hell The Beatles had 4-track recorders, in the 60's! I don't get the whole obsession with purposelessly using less mics than what's needed, listen to DSOTM then listen to the Wall and notice how much better vocals and drums fit in the mix.

Pink Floyd and Beatles are not right examples. They are electric bands. So whatever goes to record is synthesized by mixing engineers. When you record acoustic music in live setting, one can choose to capture sound in hall rather than simulate it using FX processors. There just few microphones can be enough. This is exactly what these folks do. Do you recall Mercury Living Presence records and how good most if them sound?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24252291


Pink Floyd and Beatles are not right examples. They are electric bands. So whatever goes to record is synthesized by mixing engineers. When you record acoustic music in live setting, one can choose to capture sound in hall rather than simulate it using FX processors. There just few microphones can be enough. This is exactly what these folks do. Do you recall Mercury Living Presence records and how good most if them sound?



Don't kid yourself anything that is recorded is processed in one way or another. Unless your talking about something else?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_24252330

Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24252291


Pink Floyd and Beatles are not right examples. They are electric bands. So whatever goes to record is synthesized by mixing engineers. When you record acoustic music in live setting, one can choose to capture sound in hall rather than simulate it using FX processors. There just few microphones can be enough. This is exactly what these folks do. Do you recall Mercury Living Presence records and how good most if them sound?



Don't kid yourself anything that is recorded is processed in one way or another. Unless your talking about something else?

I spoke with engineer behind these (DTR) records. That is why I know what they do.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24252814


I spoke with engineer behind these (DTR) records. That is why I know what they do.



I find that very interesting, I'd like to know what the process is from beginning to end. If it's all acoustical there is no soundboard to tap into, so I get the microphone part. I'm just wondering how they process it and put it on an album. Thanks for your post
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please#post_24252846


I find that very interesting, I'd like to know what the process is from beginning to end. If it's all acoustical there is no soundboard to tap into, so I get the microphone part. I'm just wondering how they process it and put it on an album. Thanks for your post

I think he's talking about effects processors, even then musicians use more than two microphones.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbeam418  /t/1467769/list-well-mastered-engineered-and-recorded-cds-here-please/0_100#post_24253354




I think he's talking about effects processors, even then musicians use more than two microphones.



Wouldn't there still be a mixing from all the different microphones and it would end up not sounding at all like we heard it live? Being an avid concert goer venue acoustics vary from spot to spot immensely. Or am I off track here?
 
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