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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
and it can be big: be it unleashed dynamics or that oomph of the widefield, untouched soundtrack....


every single person who I made listening to the opening trailers (dolby, thx, dts) on laserdiscs reacted the same way: the wow factor.... it's as if the whole room weighted 2 tons suddenly...



sure, there's lots of great sounding dvds carrying that oomph but not as much as it should , especially when some are compared to their ld big brothers.


ok, end of nostalgy mode :)
 

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I notice the same thing too.


The DTS titles on LD seemed to be recorded at higher levels, HOWEVER, there was no doubting the increased dynamic range that laser disc affords over DVD.


DVD sounds compressed (mainly because it is) compared to good old analog LD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hi

we discussed several times this ld-dvd differences and in fact, the bulck of the reason behind the oomph difference lies first the master used and /or the modifications applied for the audio on dvd, be it toning down or complete modification/compression like mi casa has become unfamous for.


one dvd in particular that is unable to match the ld even when raising the level to match the ld level is TPM. Heat dvd - ld comes to mind also. so many


it's useless discussion anyway, we won't change a thing


I saw Nemesis in theaters, dolby 320kbps: awesome audio ! before we accuse compression (is it me saying that ? :D ), the first most important factor is the mix itself and way too often ,it's modified when encoded on dvd...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thebland
...DVD sounds compressed (mainly because it is) compared to good old analog LD.
On LD the video (and the all but unheard FM stereo audio tracks) is analog but the DTS, DD, and/or LPCM audio is digital. DTS is full rate on LD but can be full or half on DVD. I think DD is 360 or 384 on LD and 384 or 448 on DVD.
 

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Correct me if I am wrong but LD is analogue video but it still has a digital audio track.


Hence the names Dolby Digital (DD) or Digital Theatre Surround (DTS).
 

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You are correct, the video is analog (never really understood that consider a laser is reading it). However, I believe the digital audio from LD's is in the form of RF or radio frequency, now whether it is pulse code modulation or bitstream, or if either of those two are in the RF category is beyond me.


I also forget how you can tell if a LD player is capable of passing DTS to a decoder. I remember for AC3 you had to have a capable LD player...


Anybody know of a FAQ or want to enlighten us?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by DRS
You are correct, the video is analog (never really understood that consider a laser is reading it). However, I believe the digital audio from LD's is in the form of RF or radio frequency, now whether it is pulse code modulation or bitstream, or if either of those two are in the RF category is beyond me.


I also forget how you can tell if a LD player is capable of passing DTS to a decoder. I remember for AC3 you had to have a capable LD player...


Anybody know of a FAQ or want to enlighten us?
Here is the Laserdisc FAQ . All of your questions are answered there.


Laserdiscs have four audio channels, two for PCM digital stereo/surround (like a CD), and two analog. Dolby Digital is stored on one of the analog channels in RF-modulated form in order to save the digital tracks for the PCM. They chose this for backwards-compatibility. In order to play the Dolby Digital track, you need an LD player with an RF-output, and this must be connected to an RF-demodulator.


DTS is possible on any LD player with a digital output (mid-level or better machines), and it works exactly the same as it does on DVD. DTS is stored on the digital tracks instead of PCM. DTS LDs have no PCM soundtrack (they gave up on the backwards-compatibility concerns when it came to DTS discs).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
AC3 is outputed in RF to a demodulator (outboard or inboard some A/V amps-receivers).


pal lds didn't support dts or ac3 as pal leaves less room on an ld compared to ntsc.


the real issue is the audio masters used and if they are "touched" for dvd or not. often times, they are compared to the ld version (if it exists).


here's a quick list of famous laserdiscs:

jurassic park

saving private ryan

episode one

dark city

the matrix

clear and present danger

lost world

last of the mohicans

alien

aliens

strange days


etc
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by David600
pal lds didn't support dts or ac3 as pal leaves less room on an ld compared to ntsc.
Actually, there was one PAL DTS laserdisc: Schlafes Bruder (Brother of Sleep).
 

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DTS is full rate on LD
Actually, DTS LD is not full bitrate, but is 1234kbps. It's more in the mix, the DTS ld's were prepared by DTS themselves and they just seem to have taken more time and really did it right. I don't find DTS LD to be louder or more powerful than DTS DVD (See Saving Private Ryan DTS DVD). I do find DTS LD to have a better spacial quality creating a more enveloping sound field. It is better at bringing out the subtle details of the soundtrack and I also find music to be generally better. I think DTS dvd can be just as good if prepared properly. I still can't hear a difference between the DTS LD and repressed DTS DVD of Jurassic Park. They sound nearly identitcal to me.
 
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