AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't imagine I'm the only one with the projector at the rear of the room mounted to the ceiling and having the DVD player and all at the front center. My room is completely finished and the only way for me to get my cabes to the DVD player and VCR without tearing up my room (sound insulated and all) or running cables along the ceiling is to use ~50' cables. I have an X1 and a Panasonic progressive DVD player if it matters. Am I asking for trouble? Anyone else do this and have/not have problems. Ghosting is the only problem I've heard of, so.... what is ghosting (sorry)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
I got a 35 foot triple sheilded cable for my A10X and for now I use the cheap 12 foot vga that came with it as a gender changer so I have 47 feet of cable, the only thing I sometimes notice is pixel jumping (when using it for web browsing some pixels of letters sometimes vibrate from one pixel to the one next to it) but that is rare and obviosuly not visible at all during videos, but I'm pretty sure its just because the last 12 foot is a lower quality cable so its getting interference from the power lines running next to it.


I'll get a proper gender changer to replace the 12 foot cable that should fix this.
 

·
Registered
Construction debris
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
I ran two pairs of RG6 for the s-video cable and bought a ready made s-video to RCA breakout adapter by the brand name of "Tsunami" (google for it). The breakout wouldn't fit into the back of my projector because it was too tall, so built my own from Radio Shack parts. Just make the left two pins one cable and the right two pins the other cable. The metal housing doesn't connect to anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, I have a couple more questions/comments.

I find the answers to most of the questions regarding the X1 somewhat varied in the recommendations. We are asked not to request info unless we read all the FAQ's (including techcut's) first (which I did over and over), but it seems vague to me if one should:

-Use the DVD players progressive component out into a VESA adaptor using the VESA input thereby bypassing the internal Faroudja unit.

-Use the DVD players component out and run it into an S-Video adaptor (this is what I was planning to do as I have a cheapo DVD player with probably a much lesser unit built in) and use the (better?) Faroudja unit inside the X1.

-Just simply run an S-Video cable which also uses the X1 internal Faroudja unit. I'm not really sure if there would be any difference between the latter two as they both use the X1's internal Faroudja unit.

I would assume the second option is the best. It does state that if the DVD players doubler is of equal quality to use it's progressive, but I highly doubt mine is (bottom of the line Panny).

Quote from Techcut:

"if the deinterlacing in the DVD player is equivalent to that of the projector...then the picture should be better using the progressive output of the DVD player into the VGA input of the projector."

A quote from higher up in the same site:

"Only 480i, 576i, s-video, and composite use the Faroudja processing, so these sources may look better than 480p and 576p from a progressive DVD player that does not have Faroudja inside."

This is why I chose to use S-Video input in the X1 from the component outputs in non-progressive mode into an adaptor. Make sense.... ?

Help me. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Grantv,


I am in the same boat you are. I've just received the component to vga and component to svideo adapters from Infocus for the x1 and was planning to experiment. I also have an inexpensive $80.00 progressive dvd player. I was going to see if I can tell the difference between 480i using Svideo to Svideo, 480i using component / svideo adapter, and 480p using component to component/vga adapter. Right now I'm using the regular svideo cable that came with the dvd player, and happy with the picture. Do you think experimenting is worth the trouble? Which option have you found to be the best? How much better (if noticable) will the picture be with each option? I'm ready to move on from researching home theatre. Thank you in advance for a reply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I kinda depended on the fact that the S-Video using the built in Faroudja unit would be superior to my DVD player so I did not buy any sort of cable besides my special ordered 50' S-Video and 50' RCA (for the VHS). I will be using my component to S-V adaptor at the DVD player end.

My equipment is at the far other end of the room so I bought ahead assuming that the S-Video would do the job better than the VGA input. This is what I understood from Techcut's site. If there is a difference I'll probably never know as I special ordered these cables, ran them through my ceiling (hard enough as it is being sound insulated and all) through the ceiling in the adjacent room down and back into my room. I don't really want to try that again soon for a picture that MAY be better or may be worse! :) I'd be curious what you come up with. Email me if you prefer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Interlaced component shoulkd give much better results than s-video, s-video is pretty poor, almost as bad as composite. You'd probably get much better results sending component with the s-video adapter which is a much higher quality signal and will still go through faroudja.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
You should get better results using the Component rather than the S-Video cable. A video signal is made up of Red, Blue, and Green color signals along with the Luminance (Brightness) signal. S-Video splits out the Chroma and Luminance information onto 2 cables. Basically pushing the Red, Blue and Green signals together on one Cable. Component splits the Chroma signal out to a Red and Blue signal and uses the 3rd cable for Luminance. The Green signal can then be determined by the other two colors. As you can see, component should give a little better color due to the seperation of signals.
 

·
Registered
Construction debris
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
The data on the DVD is already in the format of luma + red/blue differential. To output S-Video, the DVD player has to combine the red/blue together followed by the projector having to pick them apart. Try to use the native colorspaces of the media:


LaserDisc is composite

VHS and S-VHS is S-Video

DVD is component


This isn't a hard and fast rule. For instance, a LaserDisc player that has an S-Video output (hopefully) has at least some kind of comb filter onboard. Now it is possible that the TV it is hooked up to has a better comb filter, so by all means experiment with a composite cable and an S-Video cable. If the TV has a superior comb filter then the composite connection will actually provide the better signal.


Additionally, the DVD theoretically will have an easier time deinterlacing the image being that it still has everything in the digital domain. Realistically, the DVD player might be a dismal pile of trash, so by all means test to see which setup works better. I'm just layin' down the theory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
First off I must say that this is a great topic. I own the X1 and have to run 50 ft cable to my unit. Mind you I have an apartment and running wires in the wall is not an option. I bought both adapters from infocus (vesa to component & s-video to component) adapters. I figured at $10 each and $5 shipping I didn't have much to lose and perhaps something to gain.


I did do some experimenting and I have to say I didn't notice any difference between running s-video and using component through the s-video port (480i).


However, reading this post, I decided to give it another shot. This time I was armed with the Finding Nemo dvd (very colorful) and 12-foot cables. One of which is the s-video cable that came with the x1 and the other is a cheap component cable. I placed my dvd player close to the projector so that it would all reach and had both cables hooked up to my dvd player at the same time. In case you are wondering, I have an older non-progressive toshiba dvd player model sd-2109. Anyways, I chose a scene in Nemo that was very colorful...a scene with the corral...and paused it. First I connected the s-video cable and studied the scene very carefully. Mainly focusing on specific parts of the scene (flowers, fish, etc.) Then I connected the component cable and to my surprise I did see a difference!


I noticed much more vibrant colors, and details were seen that were not with the s-video cable. On my dvd counter, the scene is at 11:08 right when there are 3 yellow fish swimming by at the top left. I focused on an area above this rainbow-shaped rock (don't know the correct name) where there was a beam of light shining on a flower (once again, don't know the correct name) that was green. With the component cable, the beam of light was better defined and the color was much deeper. There also was another flower that had a beam of light on it and I noticed the same result. With the s-video cable the flower's color was rather washed-out therefore dissipating the light beam where it wasn't as easy to define.


Up until this test I would have said that using component cable wasn't any better than s-video. I stand corrected. It's WAY better. To think for the past month I have had this unit I have been using s-video cable. What a waste. I am buying a 50ft component cable promptly.


By no means do I say I am an expert, but seeing is believing. I think I have a fairly good eye for color. Hope this helped you somewhat. I tried my best to be as detailed as possible with my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I hope somebody is still reading this. So now it seems the best option is to use my s-video in via the component to s-video adaptor. Is there any difference between:

-Using the component to s-video adaptor right at the DVD player and running a 50' s-video cable and/or

-Running 3 @ 50' component cables to the X1 and then the splitter? From what I understand the adaptor (and the X1) has extra prongs for carrying a better than standard s-video signal (?).

Obviously the latter would be a bit more expensive but if it's better I'll spend the extra few dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
A standard s-video cable will not connect to the infocus adapter since it has extra pins. Its not better than standard s-video signal, its a component signal that goes to the X1s s-video input since it has extra pins to carry a component signal, and you must use a component cable because an s-video cable cant carry a component signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
If you decide not to use it you can always sell it on ebay
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top