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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I am looking for a projector in my media room which is 14X17ft.

 

Please recommend me a home theater projector for under $1500.

 

Why not describe your room and your setup - Dedicated home theater with no windows.

What is your ceiling height? - ~ 9 ft

What is your throw distance? ~13 ft

What is your screen size diagonal? ~ new home, yet to install a screen.

What is your viewing distance (eyes to screen)? ~10-14 ft

What is the wall color? ~ Kilim Beige

What is the ceiling color? ~ Kilim Beige

Is this a dedicated space? - Yes

How much light control do you have? ~95%

What type of screen do you intend to use? - yet to research on this

 

Nice to have features: 

 

1) Netflix

2) Youtube

3) Wifi
 

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13ft throw may narrow your choices unless you want a huge diagonal, what is your diagonal measurement ?

 

+1 on the Netflix, youtube wifi comment above, even if you find a projector with it on you can be sure that it won't get updated as frequently as (say) a bluray player.

 

on the DLP question above you need to check if you (& family) are sensitive to rainbow effects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do not know the difference between LCD and DLP. The primary use of this projector is going to be for watching movies.


I can live without Netflix and YouTube.


I did not measure the diagonal. Attached the picture from model home,it's going to look similar except the colors.
image.jpg 695k .jpg file
 

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There is a LOT more to consider than just the projector which you can decide to consider or not.


1. I would go with about a 110" to 120" diagonal screen.


With that in mind, the BenQ W1070 will work with a 120" diagonal.

The Optoma HD25 series will work with a 110" diagonal.


Either model is a solid entry level unit.


For more money and higher quality in a dedicated space, I would go with the JVC RS46 for about $2,700, which I realize is not in your budget.


Keep colors dark, make sure that you have separate zones of lighting, and that the main recessed lights are broken into lights over seating (on a dimmer) and lights over the rest of the space, plus any other lighting. Only lights to ever be on would be lights over seating.


Go with decent floor standing speakers. On-wall for surrounds. Prefer no in-wall models. Absolutely no in-ceiling speakers. Subwoofers matter. There's a lot more to all of this, but for entry level, this looks like a good start.


The model theater is ..... ummmm.... wow.
 

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The link at the top of this forum relating to conference venues, etc. has some kind of scripting error and should be repaired.


It's time the Moderator or somebody post a Sticky Thread that recites the Ten (or five?) Commandments for people researching a new Projector Room/Theater -- darkened surfaces, light control, types/sizes of screens, throw distance considerations, etc. It should also mention fundamentals of acoustic treatment, possibly referencing that separate AVS forum (although a summary would save a lot of swimming through that formidably voluminous thread).


.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimeTime  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24490050


The link at the top of this forum relating to conference venues, etc. has some kind of scripting error and should be repaired.


It's time the Moderator or somebody post a Sticky Thread that recites the Ten (or five?) Commandments for people researching a new Projector Room/Theater -- darkened surfaces, light control, types/sizes of screens, throw distance considerations, etc. It should also mention fundamentals of acoustic treatment, possibly referencing that separate AVS forum (although a summary would save a lot of swimming through that formidably voluminous thread).


.
I agree... It seems every day people are asking the same question, then have a terrible room with terrible light conditions, and are looking for a projector to solve their 'bad room' issues. Those with good rooms, and a willingness to work towards a better setup certainly do well, but I think lighting is one of the most thought-after items which always surprises people when it comes up as an issue.


But, this setup seems like it will end up being halfway decent for the video. The audio can be it's own discussion entirely.
 

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I think it's important that the acoustics be considered concurrently with the video/lighting.


If the room needs darkened, a simple coat of paint will do little for the acoustics. However, with a little extra effort, an appropriate wall/floor covering (or acoustic tile) can often achieve both goals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you.


I see another model, BenQ 1080, is it better than 1070?


Speakers, prewiring for 7.1. I got recommendation to go for HTD speakers, which are around $3000 for what I was looking for. Yes, planning for 2 floor standing speakers.


What dark colors would you recommend for wall and ceiling?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24489885


There is a LOT more to consider than just the projector which you can decide to consider or not.


1. I would go with about a 110" to 120" diagonal screen.


With that in mind, the BenQ W1070 will work with a 120" diagonal.

The Optoma HD25 series will work with a 110" diagonal.


Either model is a solid entry level unit.


For more money and higher quality in a dedicated space, I would go with the JVC RS46 for about $2,700, which I realize is not in your budget.


Keep colors dark, make sure that you have separate zones of lighting, and that the main recessed lights are broken into lights over seating (on a dimmer) and lights over the rest of the space, plus any other lighting. Only lights to ever be on would be lights over seating.


Go with decent floor standing speakers. On-wall for surrounds. Prefer no in-wall models. Absolutely no in-ceiling speakers. Subwoofers matter. There's a lot more to all of this, but for entry level, this looks like a good start.


The model theater is ..... ummmm.... wow.
 

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The color isn't as important as getting the surfaces to reflect less light. Anything away from white or bright -- the darker the better (e.g., navy blue instead of baby blue, hunter green instead of lime green, chocolate brown instead of beige, etc.) And, of course, grey (or black!) instead of white.


For acoustics, wall-covering tapestries in these dark shades, or dark fabric-covered sound panels (and/or carpet) on the walls. Along with dark rugs on the floor. A darker ceiling is a must too.


These treatments will be more expensive than just paint, but IMHO are more effective for good audio than the $3,000 spent on loudspeakers. Of course, all of this requires a cooperative spouse to pull off successfully.


I wouldn't dismiss in-wall speakers for the surround channels. If you go all out with treatments that absorb sound, then a 7.1 setup is worth the extra effects speakers as you can then fully utilize the DSP capabilities of your A/V receiver to synthesize the type of acoustical space you prefer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsrinivas  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24492427


I see another model, BenQ 1080, is it better than 1070?
No, the W1080 uses a different lens than the W1070. The 1080 is a short throw projector (very close) while the W1070 is a mid-throw model - pretty 'average'. The longer throw of the W1070 is better when it can be used.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsrinivas  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24492427


Speakers, prewiring for 7.1. I got recommendation to go for HTD speakers, which are around $3000 for what I was looking for. Yes, planning for 2 floor standing speakers.
Spend money well on the front 3 speakers, then add in the rest appropriately. There are thousands of speakers out there and I tend to find that while there are some values, you do tend to get what you pay for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsrinivas  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24492427


What dark colors would you recommend for wall and ceiling?
As said above, darker is the key. Use a flat paint, and go as dark as you find acceptable, the darker the better. Deep blues, reds, greys, browns, etc, are all better than the lighter shades. Use flat paint.


I consider lighting, room acoustics, etc. to all be a part of the 'home theater' discussion, but you will get better answers I would think in other parts of these forums.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimeTime  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24493233


For acoustics, wall-covering tapestries in these dark shades, or dark fabric-covered sound panels (and/or carpet) on the walls. Along with dark rugs on the floor. A darker ceiling is a must too.

 
 

Thank You, I did not know that wall-covering tapestries have an impact on acoustics. I see the reason why most of the model homes have wall-covering tapestries. The more I am learning, the more budget i am increasing to get these..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24493296



No, the W1080 uses a different lens than the W1070. The 1080 is a short throw projector (very close) while the W1070 is a mid-throw model - pretty 'average'. The longer throw of the W1070 is better when it can be used.

Spend money well on the front 3 speakers, then add in the rest appropriately. There are thousands of speakers out there and I tend to find that while there are some values, you do tend to get what you pay for.
Thank You. Front three, you mean center, front left and front right? 
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsrinivas  /t/1522737/looking-for-a-home-theater-projector-under-1500#post_24494265


Thank You. Front three, you mean center, front left and front right? 
Yes, you've got it. The rest are surrounds and are used for effects typically which means they get less of a workout. Still important, but in a money decision, put your money into the front three and a good subwoofer.


It's rather easy to spend a lot of money on a home theater setup. One of the best sounding rooms I was ever in put carpet (low profile) on the walls. Did a good job of softening the reflections without making the room sound dead.
 

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Hear, Hear. (About the carpet on the walls, I mean.)


I've done this, it works well to tame the acoustics -- especially in a small room. Small rooms need all the absorption they can get to minimize the "boxy" sound. And putting up covered fiberglass panels against the walls, besides being somewhat costly, encroaches on the already limited real estate available.


And if you do the carpet from scratch -- that is, coordinate its "look" with the rest of the room -- it looks pretty good. If you want the carpeted wall installation to be reversible, glue the carpet to a plastic garden trellis and then attach the assembly to the wall with finishing brads (into studs) through the trellis. It's better than just gluing carpet to the wall, which can render the sheetrock unusable if you later want to remove it and start over.
 

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Duct board doesn't take up that much more space than carpet alone and is going to be much more effective at absorption. Egg crate shaped and other styles of acoustic-grade foam might be more space consuming though. Carpet on the floor has another 1/2 inch of foam padding underneath, not entirely unlike acoustic ester foam (at least the older open-cell stuff, not sure about the acoustic properties of the recycled, pieced padding most common today), which makes it much more effective than just the carpet by itself. Carpeting the walls is of greater merit with larger spaces than smaller ones, as taming echo is about all it's good for. The smaller the room the greater the benefit of more effective absorption. Carpeted walls are better than nothing for sure - they might even be all that's desired in a larger space. But with proper placement, doing a little research as to where the room most needs absorption and where it needs to remain reflective, 2lb density open cell foam or rigid fiberglass insulation is going to be ideal.
 

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The HVAC panels will certainly work better than just carpet over drywall.


And, for my taste, you can't get the room dead enough. I know this is a hot topic over at the Treatments thread, but there are a few that agree with me: deaden the room and let signal processing and effects channels define the acoustics. One thing that is beyond dispute: the Articulation Index of the space (i.e., center-channel dialog intelligibility) gets better as you make the room deader.


That said: In my case, the plastic trellis under the carpet replaces the drywall. There is additional horizontal blocking between the 2x6 studs to support the trellis, and the studs/blocking are covered with scrap carpet strips to prevent slapping/buzzing against the rear side of the trellis.


Why? Well, the trellis is half open (e.g., acoustically transparent) and the carpet passes a lot of midrange through it. Which, rather than bouncing off drywall, gets absorbed by the R-19 behind the trellis (twice -- once on the way in, and again after reflection from the opposite interior sheetrock layer). Plus, the flexible "soft wall" property quite possibly absorbs (rather than reflects) some low frequencies better than double-thickness sheetrock.
 
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