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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking for a


stereo female 2.5mm to mono male 3.5mm adapter


and can't find one anywhere. I've gone to Radio Shack, Sam Ash, Best Buy and Fry's. Anyone know where I can get one of these adapters?



I have this microphone (stereo 2.5mm plug):





It was a ***** to route the wire and mount this thing where it's mounted.


I recently got a new head unit and it has this microphone (mono 3.5mm plug):





I don't want to have to remove the first mic..
 

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Any such adapter exists as there is no point the the adapter. You cannot parallel mics with significant gain loss and that makes it very impractical.


You can make one using a lot of adapter plumbing but the result will be very poor.
 

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Sure you can cut off the stereo plug and put on a mono 2.5 mm plug. HOWEVER, you are still paralleling the mics and will not get the response or headroom from the combination made by wiring 2 mics in parallel.


Jensen Transformer has a circuit using a 2 transformer setup to combine 2 mics onto one single input. It is NOT simply a Y cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gizmologist, do you have the model number for this?


This setup is for a car stereo so I don't want to get too complicated or expensive.



Anyone else?
 

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Maybe I'm misunderstanding the OP, but I get the impression that the new mic replaces the old, how are they in parallel?

These are cheap condensor mics, unbalanced, requiring a DC bias and feeding a high impedance input.
 

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I've been looking for a

stereo female 2.5mm to mono male 3.5mm adapter


and can't find one anywhere. I've gone to Radio Shack, Sam Ash, Best Buy and Fry's. Anyone know where I can get one of these adapters?

I have this microphone (stereo 2.5mm plug):


2 mics into a stereo connector will have one channel on TIP and one on Ring. Sleeve is common.


Drummers sometimes use a stereo mic combination of one mic above and one below a cymbal using a xformer netwook like the one in the link, although I doubt that is the OP's requirement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All I need is an adapter that will let me use the first microphone (2.5mm stereo plug) with the new head unit which has a 3.5mm mono jack.
 

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I was under the impression you wanted to use both channels into one. In that case. just cut off the existing connector and repl;ace with the new one. I have not seen a one peice adapter to do what you are looking for.
 

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Quote:
2 mics into a stereo connector will have one channel on TIP and one on Ring. Sleeve is common.

"electric" condensor mics, such as the ones pictured often use a three ocnductor connector to carry audio, bias and common....such as computer mics, which all have this connector.
 

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"electric" condensor mics, such as the ones pictured often use a three conductor connector to carry audio, bias and common....such as computer mics, which all have this connector."


Actually the term is "electret". I understand about the 3 conductor circuitry with phantom power, I work with it all the time. The mic assembly shown appears to be a dual mic system in a single housing and hence the 3 conductor plug.


Low end condenser mics frequently impose the DC on the same lines (shield and hot) as the audio but the audio is isolated from the DC by an electrolytic cap and resistor network into the audio input stage of the preamp.
 

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Thanks for the spelling correction


...even though both terms are accepted.

Quote:
I understand about the 3 conductor circuitry with phantom power,

I'm also familiar with phantom power, and these mics don't use 'phantom power', they typically use a third conductor for 5V bias, as opposed to a high impedance 48V supplied over the signal carrying conductors of a balanced line.

Have a look at one of the mic inputs on a PC sound card sometime...or a Tram Lavelier mic, or perhaps a sennheiser MK50 lav...they use a similar connection scheme to the mics in the OP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist /forum/post/18191129


I was under the impression you wanted to use both channels into one. In that case. just cut off the existing connector and repl;ace with the new one. I have not seen a one peice adapter to do what you are looking for.

Yes my intention is to use both channels into one, but I didn't want to get too complicated or spend much to do it.


I'll have to settle for one of those cheap mono female 2.5 to male 3.5 adapters I saw at Fry's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I don't want to have to remove the microphone then reroute the new one. The location it's mounted now is the best place to mount a mic. in my car, but it's a PITA to get it there.


Is there no other way to use it without reducing the response sensitivity? List of parts I'd need and what I'd need to do with those parts?
 

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You are starting off with a low end mic. What are you trying to accomplish? The response and sensitivity will be negatively affected BUT that may not be enough of an issue for you. It all depends on what you are trying to do.


The link I posted to the Jensen site is the circuit required but the 2 transformers will cost more than your mic plus the housing and construction time.


Tell us what you are trying to do and what the end product is supposed to be. It will be easier to help you with that info.
 
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