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We own a cheer gym and sports performance training center.  I am looking for a new camcorder that will enable us to keep recording practices and competitions, as well as use slow motion for our training center.  Any ideas would be appreciated......
 

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I would look at the new Panasonic v750. It has full HD 1080/60p with slow motion modes for 120 frames per second and up to 240 fps with their software

 

It has 20x zoom, 5-axis stabilization, and manual controls with good picture quality judging from some YouTube samples.
 

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Unfortunately indoor lighting levels are usually only about 1% of outdoor direct sunlight.
http://www.kinovea.org/en/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2033#p2033


This low lighting level makes high speed video indoors very challenging as the shutter speed usually has to be slow to get enough light. Slow shutter speed results in motion blur. With automatic exposure control high speed video you have no setting to control shutter speed.


See also other posts in the same thread especially for shutter speed and resulting motion blur.


I can produce darker high speed videos at indoor tennis courts with a Casio FH100 and a shutter speed of about 1/800 sec and ISO 3200. The FH100 has manual exposure control. The camera is no longer offered.


Tennis with the high racket head speed requires a faster shutter speed than body motions.


I believe that all affordable cameras currently offered will be automatic exposure control in high speed video mode.


Try to find Youtube videos under similar conditions for any camera model that your are considering.


Consider 60p fps with shutter speed control - recent DSLRs - and also 120 fps, but I don't know of any cameras with shutter speed control in high speed video mode.
 

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I recently had to film some very high speed events (the entire event was over in 1/10 of a second) and learned some interesting things. If your goal is to produce beautiful slow motion cinema, then you need a high frame rate and a high shutter speed, which entails a very expensive camera (minimum FS700). But if your goal is only to analyze the high speed event, and you don't care if the footage looks beautiful, then all you need is a decent frame rate and a very high shutter speed (to freeze the motion), which means you can get by with a much less expensive camera. In your case, you want to use slow motion for sports training purposes, so even 30 fps will be sufficient and 60 fps will be gravy. The key is to shoot the event with a high shutter speed, like 1/250 or maybe even 1/500 so that there is very little motion blur in any frame. You can do that with most video cameras that have manual control. You will get the best results with a large sensor video camera because they can capture more light at the high shutter speed.
 

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Hi All,

The previous responses are very informative. The Panasonic v750 may work well in my application.

 

I organize local bicycle races 5 days per year (PlainvilleSpringSeries.com, on blogs, Twitter and YouTube). Yes, that is 14in. of snow in the background :( There are eight races per day. I record the finish of each race and store the camcorders away for 11 months. I currently use old Flip and Kodak "palmcorders" with an assortment of problems (e.g. shutterspeed, zoom, physical removal from 10ft high position, record leaders only). FinishLynx is a fabulous slit-camera solution that my grass roots racing hobby can never afford.

 

The first finishers are far ahead of the last participant. I would like to provide all racers their finish position and elapsed race time.

 

I am open to all solutions. The following is only one idea. I solicit your response on any improvements, or complete system re-design, that you may have. I have a $2,500 budget.

 

The finish line width is 30ft. Riders wear tyvek identification bibs on the side of their back. Sunshine reflection off the tyvek is sometimes a problem. The cameras are mounted 10ft. above the ground. I would like to mount a Panasonic v750 AND have it stream video to Personal Video Recorder ('PVR"). I could then use PVR software to review the first finishers while continuing to record the rest of the race. Time stamp on the video could provide elapsed time although it would be more convenient if the elapsed time was stamped. I could also install a physical clock display somewhere in the field of vision to record elapsed time.

 

Q: Can the Panasonic v750 stream to a PVR?

Q: Which PVR is most appropriate?

Q: Is there a cable length concern from the camcorder to the PVR?

Q: Races are conducted rain or shine. I do use a small weather-proof trailer now for observing the race and reporting results via wifi/laptops. How shall I protect equipment?

 

Thanks in advance for your advice.

 

Go Fast ... JIM
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAT3  /t/1525710/looking-for-best-slow-motion-camcorder#post_24598969


Hi All,

The previous responses are very informative. The Panasonic v750 may work well in my application.


I organize local bicycle races 5 days per year (PlainvilleSpringSeries.com, on blogs, Twitter and YouTube). Yes, that is 14in. of snow in the background
There are eight races per day. I record the finish of each race and store the camcorders away for 11 months. I currently use old Flip and Kodak "palmcorders" with an assortment of problems (e.g. shutterspeed, zoom, physical removal from 10ft high position, record leaders only). FinishLynx is a fabulous slit-camera solution that my grass roots racing hobby can never afford.


The first finishers are far ahead of the last participant. I would like to provide all racers their finish position and elapsed race time.


I am open to all solutions. The following is only one idea. I solicit your response on any improvements, or complete system re-design, that you may have. I have a $2,500 budget.


The finish line width is 30ft. Riders wear tyvek identification bibs on the side of their back. Sunshine reflection off the tyvek is sometimes a problem. The cameras are mounted 10ft. above the ground. I would like to mount a Panasonic v750 AND have it stream video to Personal Video Recorder ('PVR"). I could then use PVR software to review the first finishers while continuing to record the rest of the race. Time stamp on the video could provide elapsed time although it would be more convenient if the elapsed time was stamped. I could also install a physical clock display somewhere in the field of vision to record elapsed time.


Q: Can the Panasonic v750 stream to a PVR?

Q: Which PVR is most appropriate?

Q: Is there a cable length concern from the camcorder to the PVR?

Q: Races are conducted rain or shine. I do use a small weather-proof trailer now for observing the race and reporting results via wifi/laptops. How shall I protect equipment?


Thanks in advance for your advice.


Go Fast ... JIM

One consideration for very high accuracy is Jello Effect distortion. All or nearly all CMOS cameras use a rolling shutter electronic process to read out the sensor. Rolling shutter reads out one sensor line at a time. A line at, say, the top of the sensor is read out first and then the next line, etc. The result is that the lines at the top of a frame are read out considerably earlier than a line at the bottom. Jello effect distortion may, for example, cause a golf club to falsely appear bent during a swing.


In your application, if a bicycle were at the top of the frame and another bicycle at the bottom of the frame and they were both in a dead heat at the finish line, the bicycle at the bottom of the frame would appear to edge out the one at the top. See the Aiptek video below, the bar simulates the bicycles crossing the finish line. I guess it is likely that you are not interested in sub-frame rate accuracy and this is not an issue for you. ? I would look into it if you want to declare very close finishes from a single frame. Search: jello effect.


Example of Jello Effect distortion. The fan blades are straight and all blades have the same width. From a still picture. http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/39393614



Jello Effect for an Aiptek Video Camera, 60fps, 720p lines. Cylinder rotating at 8 rps. The black line is actually parallel to the sides of the cylinder.



Jello Effect reply
http://www.kinovea.org/en/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2034#p2034
 

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Hi All,

Thanks for bringing 'Jello Effect distortion to my attention.

I cannot afford a line-scan camera.

Which camcorder do you recommend?

Go Fast ... JIM
 

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I'd recommend a camera with shutter speed control and set it fast enough to take care of the problem. You're also not likely to have your subject fill as much of the frame as the jello examples and bodies lack the obvious straight lines as above. Good luck.
 

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I have used Slow Motion on my Panasonic HC-V750 and it works quite well. A few points you should know:-

You will need a Class 10 SD card.

The Slo-Mo operation is included in a normal shot by the operator pressing an icon on the LCD screen. It will allow three Slo-Mo inserts into one shot. So you will need a camera operator to activate the Slo-Mo at the right time.

You can reduce the Slo-Mo speed again in the playback mode (I have not tried this myself yet) and it will record a second file. From the Manual:-

 

You can convert the playback speed of parts recorded in FULL HD Slow Motion Video Mode (l 58)

to 1/4 normal speed, and copy them.

Once converting scenes recorded in FULL HD Slow Motion Video Mode, you can play them back on

another device at 1/4 normal speed.

Press the recording/playback button to switch this unit to the Playback Mode.

Touch the play mode select icon, and select [ALL MP4/iFrame] or [1080/50p] in [MP4/

iFrame].

1 Select the menu.

2 Touch a scene recorded in FULL HD Slow Motion Video Mode.

≥ On the thumbnail screen in Playback Mode, scenes recorded as FULL HD Slow Motion Video are

displayed with the indication.

≥ The scene selection is made as you touch it, and the indication appears on the thumbnail. To

cancel the operation, touch the scene again.

≥ Up to 99 scenes can be selected in succession.

3 Touch [Enter].

≥ The converted scene will be saved in the same medium as the one storing the original scene.

≥ A message asking whether to delete the original scene will be displayed. To delete the scene,

select [YES]. To keep it, select [NO].

 

You cannot directly play the Slo-Mo back on a TV or record directly to a PVR from the camera. You will need to use the SD card in a PC to see the final result. This may not apply to the re-recorded 1/4 speed version. I will need to try this also.

 

The Slo-Mo on the 750 is very smooth and (in my case) great fun to use.
 
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