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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I may finally be at a point where I am looking to get the ceiling installed in my basement to make it look a tad more complete.
I just am not sure what to do with it in regards to drop ceiling vs. drywall

Some concerns I have:
1. Walls are not drywalled. They are like a panelling for lack of better terminology (thin hard pressed board) I would love to rip all that down and do drywall too if the ceiling doesnt get too expensive.
2. Bottom of joists are 7'9" high. My PJ has a cross bar mounted up in the joists to get me extra height
3. Trying to think ahead about if issues arrise ( I had a bad clog in my main drain over the fall that I needed to pop the service plug to get it all worked out. This would not have been possible with drywall.
4. Drop ceiling may cause clearance issues unless I can get a real close fit, but cost of the snap grid that mounts to the joists gets pretty expensive with lots of waste left over apparently.

Any suggestions keeping a lower budget in mind and my height concerns and possible access issues?
 

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( I had a bad clog in my main drain over the fall that I needed to pop the service plug to get it all worked out. This would not have been possible with drywall.

Any suggestions keeping a lower budget in mind and my height concerns and possible access issues?
You can/should build a panel to access the service plug (or water cut-off valves, etc).

Definitely do drywall over a drop ceiling.

Even if you don't do clips and channel, consider a 2nd layer... OSB or 5/8" fire-rated drywall. I did OSB as by base layer (with GG) and love it. It was so easy to screw on the drywall (and trim and anything else I ever want to attach to the walls) without having to line up with the joists and studs.

Ideally with GG if the budget permits (budget always seems tight now, but a year from now you will probably wish you went ahead and did it when you could).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
this isnt my forever home though I may add. I just want to add to my enjoyment for the next couple years until I put the house on the market and add to resale. I dont want to get crazy with it. So budget is a big concern
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What's osb? I am not real handy and shoulder problems so would be contracting and not doing myself. I would love to do the walls too if I could . If I could do it all about $1k that would be awesome. I'm thinking it will probably be a lot more though?
Gg is super expensive if I recall?

Room is about 36x14x7'9"


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What's osb? I am not real handy and shoulder problems so would be contracting and not doing myself. I would love to do the walls too if I could . If I could do it all about $1k that would be awesome. I'm thinking it will probably be a lot more though?
Gg is super expensive if I recall?

Room is about 36x14x7'9"


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OSB = oriented strand board
http://www.homedepot.com/p/NA-Orien...578-in-x-47-75-in-x-95-75-in-339696/205821485

5 gallons of green glue is about $250. It covers 365 sq ft.

36x14 = 504 sq ft. It's allowable to use half of the regular dose (one tube per panel instead of 2 tubes) and cover the whole ceiling with one bucket... you'll get more than half the benefit.

If you're not DIY, then I'm not sure how far $1000 will get you with the walls. Depends on your area and if you're paying full rate or if you know a buddy of a buddy that does it on the side for beer money.

If DIY, you could do walls and ceiling OSB+GG+5/8, tape, mud, sanded, and paint for $1000. But I expect contracting it out will cost more than the materials.
 

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What's osb? I am not real handy and shoulder problems so would be contracting and not doing myself. I would love to do the walls too if I could . If I could do it all about $1k that would be awesome. I'm thinking it will probably be a lot more though?
Gg is super expensive if I recall?

Room is about 36x14x7'9"


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
OSB = Oriented Strand Board, just google it

OSB is helpful if you plan to install trim, other building materials, etc and want to avoid looking for joists or studs. If you are not installing two layers, OSB not useful to consider.

I paid $20 per sheet to hang and finish drywall in my basement. That said, the finishers never showed and I never made the final payment. So, the rate was closer to $15 per sheet.

Your ceiling would require 18 sheets per layer.
Walls would require 25 sheets per layer (assuming no windows, closets, doors, etc.) - so you must need less

43 sheets at $20 per sheet would be $860. Drywall would cost another $400. So, a single layer of drywall for the whole room is a stretch for $1,000. Of course, they would charge additional for demo if you want them to remove and dispose of existing walls.

If you limit to the ceiling, you should be under $1,000 if you can find a crew that is willing to take a small job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
My brother in law has a contracting business. I'm sure he will do a deal for me, but I want him to make some money too. Hopefully he can come over this weekend to take a look. I could probably swing another $500 or so instead of a new bd player I planned on buying. There are some other odds and ends too to do, but not sure how much the other crap will add up like boxing out the beams and poles.
I only planned on the ceiling since its sorely needed, but I figured the walls look like crap and if it's only a little more for them to avoid gaps where the two types of materials meet, might be worth stretching budget.
 
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