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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


I was looking for an entry level 5.1 surround system ($400-$500)


But the speakers for 5.1 surround at that price seam really small (eg. the Energy Take Classic 5.1)


I found two 20 year old "U.S. Pioneer Corp." "Project 100" 2-way speakers in the attic. (each speaker max. 35 watts, 8 ohms impedance)


The boxes are 22'' x 13'' x 10.5'' and the woofer diagonals are 10" (~8" on the inner cone part)


I couldn't find much information on these, just read on a forum that they were entry level speakers


How might the quality of these be compared to the small "Take classic" speakers or other modern entry level speakers? Would it be better to buy a new complete system? or incorporate the project 100s in a "custom" setup?


Thanks



Note: I hooked these speakers up to my Panasonic bd80 blu ray player L and R analogue outputs through the kenwood stereo amp I found with them. I put in a Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon blu ray disk and the speakers sounded huge playing the "menu music"; they sounded almost like real drums. I have a hard time believing the tiny "Take classic" speakers could sound this big and full, but maybe there's some technological magic in there.


That being said, my point of reference are 30$ logitech computer speakers, which get blown out of the water by the project 100s
 

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The Energy sats and sub system will be more accurate, but I totally agree that the Pioneer's *overall* sound will be much more full, rich and room-filling.


Large speakers like those, as in anything larger than a 6.5" woofer, get a bad rep these days, but i think that is because so many people have never heard them set up properly, which means NOT stuffing them in the corners of a room which results in boomy sloppy bass and hollow sounding mids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your reply,


what would you suggest in terms of room placement? the room I will probably use is 14' x 13' by 9'


I realize it probably depends on a host of other factors, but do you have some general guidelines for big speakers like these?



thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nailimexam
Thank you for your reply,


what would you suggest in terms of room placement? the room I will probably use is 14' x 13' by 9'


I realize it probably depends on a host of other factors, but do you have some general guidelines for big speakers like these?



thanks
Each room is diffferent as far as how it reacts to a certain set of speakers, so these are only rough guidelines. Keep them away from corners; try to face them towards you in a triangle configuration, with the base of the triangle being a little smaller than the sides that extend from the speakers to your listening position; pull them off the floor, say at least ten iches or so to avoid another source of booming *mid* bass which is another reason "short" large speakers like this have a rep for a tubby or "thick" sound quality. And if possible place them at ear level for best stereo imaging, though the lowest bass frequencies may be reduced somewhat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Watched "The Rookie" tonight with the Project 100s hooked up.


Sounded great, except unfortunately the right speaker has a buzz on mid to high pitched loud sounds (even loud dialogue, for example whenever a female actor raised her voice)


Could this be a problem with the right tweeter? and might replaceing it solve the problem?


I also noticed the inner part of the woofer cone on the right speaker has 1/3 of the mess torn off. But this didn't seem to effect sound too much. (Unless it some how had something to do with the buzzing on high pitches)


Any ideas on locating the problem?


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nailimexam /forum/post/20891766


Watched "The Rookie" tonight with the Project 100s hooked up.


Sounded great, except unfortunately the right speaker has a buzz on mid to high pitched loud sounds (even loud dialogue, for example whenever a female actor raised her voice)


Could this be a problem with the right tweeter? and might replaceing it solve the problem?


I also noticed the inner part of the woofer cone on the right speaker has 1/3 of the mess torn off. But this didn't seem to effect sound too much. (Unless it some how had something to do with the buzzing on high pitches)


Any ideas on locating the problem?


Thanks

The buzz could definitely be emanating from the tweeter, maybe something like a loose lead from the rear connector to the voice coil which has become unglued and is rubbing against the housing,not surprising considering the age fo the speakers. It also could be that the voice coil is partially burned out from a previous high power listening session. But it also may be as simple as a loose screw somewhere (bass isn't the only set of frequencies that can cause materials to vibrate/resonate). Carefully snugging up all the speaker's screws will eliminate that possiblity.
Quote:
1/3 of the mess torn off.

"mess"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
oops, meant to type "mesh", but I someone informed me it is called a dust cap : )


Any tips on order of possible buzzes I should check and how to go about it?


I checked all the external screws, and they are all tight
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nailimexam /forum/post/20895878


oops, meant to type "mesh", but I someone informed me it is called a dust cap : )


Any tips on order of possible buzzes I should check and how to go about it?


I checked all the external screws, and they are all tight

You can buy dust caps from online retailers.


Buzz sources: besides the enclosure itself, the drivers and by that I mean the tweeter, woofer or any other device that generates sound via electrical means, also can have loose screws. They may also may have sealing material, like foam or some kind of sealant behind the driver's mounting plate, that has dried up, shrunk and is now moving in response to the drivers' vibrations.


Their might be something loose inside the enclosure too.


And it could be something electrical-related, possibly in the crossover which is located inside the enclosure, but that is pushing the envelope of my speaker knowledge so cannot provide any useful advice about how to go about analyzing and repairing that.


You might want to check out www.diyaudio.com for more possiblities.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nailimexam
oops, meant to type "mesh", but I someone informed me it is called a dust cap : )


Any tips on order of possible buzzes I should check and how to go about it?


I checked all the external screws, and they are all tight
dust caps can definately cause buzzing. I had an old speaker that did that once, i just removed the dust cap and the buzzing was gone. The glue had dried up and the dustcap flapping against the cone cause a "buzzing" sound.
 
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