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Peter Jackson To Receive Visual Effects Society Lifetime Achievement Award Next Month
I take it they haven't watched this scene, or else they might wish to revoke that award.

 

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I take it they haven't watched this scene, or else they might wish to revoke that award.
You don't like that segment either? I thought I was the only one.
 

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You don't like that segment either? I thought I was the only one.
There are people who do like it? It was groan-worthy in the theater and hasn't gotten any better with age. All that green-screen treadmill running just looks embarrassing.
 

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There are people who do like it? It was groan-worthy in the theater and hasn't gotten any better with age. All that green-screen treadmill running just looks embarrassing.
When I hear the phrase "over the top" that dinosaur chase is the image that always pops into my head. As much as I love what WETA brought to the industry with LOTR I just cringe at that scene. I would rewatch KK a lot more often if it wasn't there.
 

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When I hear the phrase "over the top" that dinosaur chase is the image that always pops into my head. As much as I love what WETA brought to the industry with LOTR I just cringe at that scene. I would rewatch KK a lot more often if it wasn't there.
ILM is still the preeminent visual effects studio...WETA is great in terms of performance capture but nothing beats ILM as far as realistic visual effects
 

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When I hear the phrase "over the top" that dinosaur chase is the image that always pops into my head. As much as I love what WETA brought to the industry with LOTR I just cringe at that scene. I would rewatch KK a lot more often if it wasn't there.
I feel that way about roughly half the movie. It has so many scenes that serve no purpose and ought to be cut.
 

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I feel that way about roughly half the movie. It has so many scenes that serve no purpose and ought to be cut.
Probably the result of a director being too much in love with a subject. That feeling doesn't always apply to the audience.
 

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Wayne Che Yip Boards ‘The Lord Of The Rings’ TV Series As Director And Co-Executive Producer; Will Helm Four Episodes Of Amazon Original
By Matt Grobar

Wayne Che Yip has joined the creative team behind the Lord of the Rings TV series, as both a co-executive producer and director, Amazon Studios announced today. As a director, he’ll follow in the footsteps of J.A. Bayona (A Monster Calls), who helmed the series’ first two episodes.

Developed by J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay, the Lord of the Rings series is described as an “epic drama,” set in the Second Age of Middle-earth— thousands of years before the events of the Lord of the Rings films, and the novels by J.R.R. Tolkien on which they were based.

Following a huge ensemble of characters, as they confront the re-emergence of evil on their continent, the show will take viewers from the depths of the Misty Mountains, to the forests of elf-capital Lindon, to the stunning island kingdom of Númeno and beyond.

 

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For the first time, new edition of Lord of the Rings will include J.R.R. Tolkien's own art

Following successful museum exhibitions in 2018 and 2019, the author's own illustrations will be incorporated into a new edition of his most famous book for the first time since its 1954 publication.

By Christian Holub

J.R.R. Tolkien wasn't just a writer. The beloved author of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit was also an amateur illustrator, and for the first time a new edition of Tolkien's most famous work will include his own art, to be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt later this year.

Back in 2019, a year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit and made museum-going difficult, the Morgan Library & Museum in New York City hosted an exhibit called "Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth," which originated at the Bodleian Library in Oxford and showed off many pieces of Tolkien's art — illustrations to accompany his Middle-earth works like The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion as well as Christmas cards for his children. In the wake of that exhibit's success, publishers of Tolkien's work now want to integrate his art more fully into his writing.

"His charming and evocative illustrations that accompanied The Hobbit, particularly the now-iconic image that appears on its cover, have become as beloved as the story they accompany," Houghton Mifflin Harcourt publisher Deb Brody said in a statement. "Yet the author himself was characteristically modest, dismissive of the obvious and rare artistic talent he possessed despite having had no formal training. This modesty meant that relatively little else of his artwork was known of or seen during his lifetime, and generally only in scholarly books afterwards."

Brody continued, "this all changed in 2018, with the first of three record-breaking Tolkien exhibitions in Oxford, New York and Paris, at which hundreds of thousands of people were able to appreciate at first hand the extraordinary artistic achievement of a man known primarily for the written word. Among the exhibits was a selection of the paintings, drawings and sketches that Tolkien produced when writing The Lord of the Rings. Originally intended by him purely for his personal pleasure and reference, after such an overwhelmingly positive response by people to Tolkien the Artist it seemed fitting to finally reunite this art with the words it enhances, and we are delighted that in so doing it will allow people to enjoy this masterpiece anew."



There's a lot of energy around Tolkien's legendarium these days. 2019 saw the release of a Tolkien biopic starring Nicholas Hoult. Amazon has fully cast its upcoming The Lord of the Rings show, which looks to be set during the Second Age of Middle-earth. Actors who have previously appeared in Tolkien adaptations, like Ian McKellen and John Rhys-Davies, recently banded together for an initiative called Project Northmoor that sought to raise funds to buy Tolkien's old home in Oxford and set it up as as a cultural center and writing retreat, but the fundraising effort officially failed this week.

The new edition of The Lord of the Rings, the first since its original 1954 publication to feature Tolkien's own art, will be published in the U.S. on October 19, 2021, and subsequently translated around the world. Check out the cover above.

 

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Soviet Union’s Lost ‘Lord of the Rings’ Movie Rediscovered After 30 Years and Released for Free

The Russian-language film posted on YouTube, earning over 800,000 views in its first week.


Zack Sharf

As first reported by The Guardian, a Soviet Union-era television adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s beloved works was recently rediscovered and uploaded to stream for free on YouTube. The Russian-language 1991 made-for-TV movie is titled “Khraniteli” and is based on the first novel in “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, “The Fellowship of the Ring.” Posted to YouTube in two parts, the streams have earned a combined 800,000 views and counting in one week. The Guardian claims the video is “the only adaptation of ‘The Lord of the Rings’ trilogy believed to have been made in the Soviet Union.”

“Khraniteli” aired on television in 1991 only once before it disappeared. The film’s score was composed by Andrei Romanov of the rock band Akvarium. For the last 30 years, the movie has remained lost in the Leningrad Television vault and it was not found until 5TV, the successor to Leningrad Television, uploaded it onto YouTube for free. According to Russia’s Tolkien website World of Fantasy, “Lord of the Rings” fans “have been searching the archives but had not able to find this film for decades.”

As The Guardian notes: “The Soviet version includes some plot elements left out of [Peter] Jackson’s $93m blockbuster, including an appearance by the character Tom Bombadil, a forest dweller cut from the English-language version because he was too long-winded and failed to move the plot forward.”

That a “Lord of the Rings” movie would disappear at the end of the Soviet Union is not too surprising, as Soviet-era adaptations and translations of Tolkien’s Middle Earth saga are nearly nonexistent. The first “Soviet samizdat translation of ‘The Fellowship of the Ring’ was produced in 1966, more than a decade after Tolkien’s book of that name was published,” The Guardian reports. “And the first published translation came out in the Soviet Union in 1982, although its sequels, ‘The Two Towers’ and ‘The Return of the King,’ were not released until years later.”

When Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy opened in Russia in the early 2000s, they proved immensely popular with audiences. “The Fellowship of the Ring” grossed just over $7 million in Russia (via Box Office Mojo), followed by $8.8 million for “The Two Towers” and $12 million for the final installment “The Return of the King.”

 

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When Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy opened in Russia in the early 2000s, they proved immensely popular with audiences. “The Fellowship of the Ring” grossed just over $7 million in Russia (via Box Office Mojo), followed by $8.8 million for “The Two Towers” and $12 million for the final installment “The Return of the King.”

7, 8.8 and 12 million is considered "immensely" popular in Russia? Movie tickets must be very cheap there.
 

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The 5 most surprising moments from the Lord of the Rings adaptation you've never heard of

Originally made for Soviet TV in 1991, Khranteli is now available in two parts on YouTube and has some fascinating takes on J.R.R. Tolkien's iconic scenes.

By Christian Holub

Modern fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's work surely know The Lord of the Rings at least partly (if not primarily) through the lens of the beloved big-screen adaptations directed by Peter Jackson at the dawn of the 21st century. But for decades after the original 1955 publication of the Middle-earth saga, it was not a guarantee that the quest to destroy the One Ring would ever make it to the screen. The closest thing many American fans got was the 1978 animated film by Ralph Bakshi.

But now a new treasure has been unveiled. It turns out that in 1991, the Soviet Union adapted the first volume of LOTR, The Fellowship of the Ring, as a TV movie titled Khraniteli. Thought lost to time, the whole thing has now been uploaded to YouTube in two parts by 5TV, the successor to original broadcaster Leningrad Television.

There are no English subtitles for the Russian dialogue and scene-setting, but it's not too hard for LOTR fans to figure out what's going on. Then again, it was filmed and broadcast a full decade before Jackson's culture-changing version of The Fellowship of the Ring hit theaters, so the set pieces and special effects are a lot rattier.

Nevertheless, it's fun to go through and spot how this older take on LOTR handled certain pivotal scenes (including one that never made it into Jackson's films). Below, check out five of our favorite moments.

Gandalf's fireworks
As a member of the ancient order called the Istari, Gandalf is identified as a "wizard" to most residents of Middle-earth. But the hobbits of the Shire have much less familiarity with magic than, say, the elves of Rivendell do. So instead of discussing metaphysical concepts, Gandalf contents himself with showing the hobbits fireworks, which are delightfully mind-blowing to the people of the Shire.

In Jackson's Fellowship, viewers see Gandalf's fireworks form a gigantic dragon. Here, Khraniteli makes inventive use of its low budget by having Gandalf wave a red flag that displays images of explosions and sparkles — magic, in its own way.

Gollum's origin
Gollum is one of the most important and memorable characters from LOTR, but he doesn't play a big part in the story until The Two Towers. Thankfully, the creators of Khraniteli still fit some Gollum time into their version of Fellowship by having Gandalf tell Frodo the story of how the Ring corrupted the hobbit-like being Smeagol into the monstrous Gollum shortly after the young hobbit acquires the artifact. In Jackson's films, this flashback opens The Return of the King.

After Smeagol's buddy Deagol finds the One Ring lying in a riverbed, the two friends fight over the precious gold object until Smeagol emerges victorious. It doesn't take long for the Ring to corrupt him beyond repair, though, and in Khraniteli that transformation is signified by the actor reappearing in a silly green suit. The scene takes place around 20 minutes in if you want to watch and see how this actor's rolling throat sounds compare to Andy Serkis' interpretation of the guttural "gollum" noise that gives the creature his iconic sobriquet.

Tom Bombadil gets his due
Now here is an instance where Khranteli unambiguously has the leg up on Jackson's films. Jackson famously jettisoned the section of Fellowship that involves the character Tom Bombadil. An enigmatic figure who has enormous power in the vicinity of his woodland home but could not care less about the struggle to destroy the One Ring, Bombadil doesn't really fit with the main story of LOTR. What he does do is instill the reader with a sense that Middle-earth is bigger and more magical than this one saga, full of mysteries that not even Tolkien himself fully understood.

The Bombadil scene in Khraniteli certainly evokes a sense of fairy-tale surrealism, as he and his wife, Goldberry, tower over the miniature hobbits in their warm home.

Gandalf's eagle ride
Gandalf sets Frodo and his hobbit companions on their quest, but is absent until they get to the elf haven of Rivendell. At the Council of Elrond, he explains why: He was held captive by his fellow wizard Saruman, and was only able to escape with the help of one of Middle-earth's enormous eagles. The sight of Ian McKellen soaring across the sky on the back of a CGI bird is one of the most unforgettable images from Jackson's films, but Khraniteli's take is memorable in its own way. Check out the bugging eyes on that bird puppet!

Trekking through Moria
What is LOTR without its giant battles? The climax of Fellowship takes place in Moria, a place of ancient dwarf mines that have since been abandoned to hordes of goblins and orcs. Lacking the detailed sets or budget for hundreds of extras, Khraniteli gives the scene a unique look, with the main actors' images spliced against an underground-looking background, engaged in blurry fights with untold enemies.

 

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Not series related but...

‘Lord Of The Rings: Fellowship Of The Ring’ & ‘The Two Towers’ China Reissue Dates Set

By Nancy Tartaglione

With a confirmed, and late-breaking, re-release date, Peter Jackson’s The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring has been scheduled to hit China’s movie theaters tomorrow (April 16). The second film, The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers, will follow next Friday, April 23. The Oscar-winning New Line trilogy will play in a remastered 4K 2D version at IMAX cinemas and in other premium formats.

Warner Bros made the announcement on its official Weibo account, and while Best Picture Academy Award winner The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King has been expected in the market, a date has not been finalized. It would appear unlikely to follow immediately as the May Day holiday in China currently has a vast lineup of local titles.

...

 

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‘Lord of the Rings’ Orc Actor Tells the Story of His Panic Attack Under Prosthetics During Filming

If actor Stephen Ure ripped off his prosthetics, it could have cost the production over $10,000 in filming delays.


Zack Sharf

Having a panic attack is never good, but it sounds especially complicated when you’re suffering one under so many pounds of prosthetic makeup that no one around you even noticed. Such was the case for actor Stephen Ure during the making of “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.” Ure starred as the Orc named Grishnakh in Peter Jackson’s trilogy. In a recent conversation with Thrillist, the actor remembered losing his swallowing mechanism during the filming of a fight scene between the Orcs and Uruk-hai. Losing his swallowing mechanism resulted in Ure getting “a bit panicky” and starting to “hyperventilate a little bit.”

“The more the panic is coming the worst that it is,” Ure said. “I’d never really experienced a panic like that. I was maybe three seconds away from ripping the face off so I could breathe, I thought I couldn’t breathe. No one can tell because I’m under all that stuff. Suddenly, I just could swallow again. Nobody knew anything. That was my own little episode. I was completely freaked out for a minute. That could have been terrible. If I had ripped that face off then that’s the day gone. That would have cost tens of thousands of dollars.”

Ure said he had to work his facial expressions hard in order for Grishnakh to look like he was emoting properly. “When I was just in resting bitchface mode, [the character] looked very sad,” the actor remembered. “He looked very forlorn. People kept coming up to me, going, ‘You okay? Can I get you something?’ I went, ‘Yeah, I’m fine, just leave me alone.’ ‘You just look like you’re a bit bummed out.'”

The character of Grishnakh marked Ure’s most high profile creature role in Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy. The actor started his work on the franchise playing a difference Orc in “The Fellowship of the Ring.” According to Thrillist, one of Ure’s most memorable set experiences occurred when he “accidentally whipped the late, great Christopher Lee in the face.” The prosthetic work for Grishnakh was so well done that no one on “The Lord of the Rings” set knew what the actual Ure looked like.

“At the wrap party for ‘Lord of the Rings,’ I’d been working on all three films, and I knew people, I found myself just standing there in the corner alone because nobody knew who I was,” Ure said. “At the time it took four and half hours to put the makeup on. I’d have to go in at 2am. By the time I was halfway through at half past five when people started arriving, I was already unrecognizable.”

 

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WOW! That is a serious amount. Awesome they are putting so much behind this. Soooo looking forward to this.

Amazon’s ‘Lord of the Ring’ Series to Cost $465 Million for One Season

By Jordan Moreau

Amazon’s upcoming “Lord of the Rings” TV series will cost approximately $465 million to produce one season, Variety has confirmed.

Radio New Zealand reported that the series, which is currently filming in the country, will spend NZ$650 million on Season 1, which converts to $464,165,000 in U.S. dollars. Sources confirmed to Variety that the hefty price tag is accurate.

The cost for “Lord of the Rings” far exceeds other pricey TV series like HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” Apple’s “The Morning Show” and Disney Plus’ “The Mandalorian,” which all cost roughly $15 million per episode. Previous estimates for “Lord of the Rings” put the production budget at $500 million for multiple seasons, not to mention the $250 million cost just for the rights from author J.R.R. Tolkien’s estate.

Stuart Nash, the Minister for Economic Development and Tourism, told Radio New Zealand, “This is fantastic, it really is…What I can tell you is Amazon is going to spend about $650 million in season one alone.”

“This will be the largest television series ever made,” Nash added.

Variety broke the news about the “Lord of the Rings” series back in 2017, but details have been scarce since then. The logline says that the series will take place thousands of years before the events of the “Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit” films and take fans back to an era in which great powers were forged, kingdoms rose to glory and fell to ruin and unlikely heroes were tested. It will also feature the greatest villain that ever flowed from Tolkien’s pen threatening to cover all the world in darkness.

The cast includes Robert Aramayo, Owain Arthur, Nazanin Boniadi, Tom Budge, Morfydd Clark, Ismael Cruz Córdova, Ema Horvath, Markella Kavenagh, Joseph Mawle, Tyroe Muhafidin, Sophia Nomvete, Megan Richards, Dylan Smith, Charlie Vickers and Daniel Weyman.

 

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Isn't that what it cost to make each one of the movies?
 

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no way are they spending $465 million on one season...something was lost in translation...Bezos is crazy rich but that sounds like an insane number
 
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