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Jamie Chung is a Korean-American actress who was born in the US or at least grew up and lived in the US. So Korean is not her native language at all, despite her ethnic background.

The episode was kind of interesting but what does that fox demon or whatever Korean lore it was suppose to be have to do with Lovecraft? Poor Tic is running into monsters all the time.

In any event, between WWII and the Korean War, it's doubtful they had the luxury to go see American movies. Post WWII is pretty brutal life everywhere, including Europe. The only country which was prosperous in the '50s was the US. Europe would take most of the decade to start raising the standard of living towards modern standards after the war.

Also American GIs did marry and bring back a lot of Korean women but it's doubtful many of these relationships unfolded as depicted -- like Tic and what's her name falling in love, like something out of the movies.

He got freaked out by the snakes so he came back to American as soon as he could?
 

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The episode was kind of interesting but what does that fox demon or whatever Korean lore it was suppose to be have to do with Lovecraft? Poor Tic is running into monsters all the time.
Lovecraft Country has become a monster of the week show similar to The Witcher or The Twilight Zone. I'm okay with that because it breaks up the normal flow and adds character development. I also like that they went away from the traditional American/European monster lore. Despite my years of watching anime, I had never heard of a kumiho. I'm hoping they introduce African, South American, Oceanian, and other Asian creatures in future episodes.


Also American GIs did marry and bring back a lot of Korean women but it's doubtful many of these relationships unfolded as depicted -- like Tic and what's her name falling in love, like something out of the movies.

He got freaked out by the snakes so he came back to American as soon as he could?
If a bunch of foxtails came out and tried to suck your soul (not in the good way), wouldn't you freak out and run away?
 

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Lovecraft Country's Jonathan Majors Breaks Down Atticus' and Ji-Ah's Fraught, Frightening, Foxy Love Story

Lovecraft Country‘s Atticus Freeman has proven himself a smart, savvy navigator of the supernatural. But in Sunday’s episode, he was literally outfoxed.

The hour took us back to 1950, when Tic’s military unit arrived in South Korea. The episode was told from the perspective of Ji-Ah, a Korean nurse played by guest star Jamie Chung (Once Upon a Time). If the character’s name sounds familiar, it’s because she’s the woman Atticus has phoned in mysterious fashion a few times since the series began.

At first, Ji-ah seems like a lonely young woman whose widowed mother is begging her to bring home a man and help restore honor to the family. But we soon learn that “bring home a man” really means “bring home a man, have sex with him and then allow the monstrous spirit dwelling inside you to kill him in the bloodiest manner possible.”

Or, more to the point: Ji-Ah is a a kumiho, or fox spirit, inhabiting the body of the widow’s daughter. There’s a long, sad story about how it got there, but what you need to know is that the kumiho needs to take 100 souls, and then it will become human.

Ji-Ah has almost reached her tally when all of the nurses on her shift are rounded up and brought to an American camp, then questioned about being Communist spies. Two of the women are killed with little preamble, and Atticus is one of the soldiers who pulls the trigger, killing Ji-Ah’s best friend. So when he winds up wounded in Ji-Ah’s hospital soon after, she decides that he will be the 100th man she murders.

Problem is, she and Atticus fall in love. Everything is great until one day, she lets her guard slip while they’re in bed, and her kumiho tails start to attack him. She’s able to pull back in time, saving him, but not before she sees scenes from his entire life playing out in her mind. She warns him that he can’t go home, even though his time in Korea is up, because he’ll die. But he’s too busy freaking out and grabbing his clothes to pay much attention; the interlude is the last time they see each other.

TVLine got Lovecraft Country star Jonathan Majors on the phone to discuss the episode, titled “Meet Me in Daegu,” which answers some questions about Tic’s life before the series began… but also poses a whole bunch of new ones.

TVLINE | Ji-Ah has clearly been on his mind since he left Korea: She appeared in his hallucination at Ardham, and he’s called her a few times. Given what he’s seen since he left came back to Chicago, do you think now he might be thinking about their last night together in a different light?
Atticus is haunted, and we don’t know that. You think his first issue is his dad, right? And you find out the reasons he’s not going home isn’t just because of the issue with his father, but also because he’s been warned not to. So, it’s twofold. Yes, he has the issue with his father, but also he’s been told [not to] by a woman that he may or may not know if he loved or is still in love with, you know?

But he’s carrying that love with him still, and therefore is carrying that sense of dread with him, as well. And then, when I get to Chicago, and all these things begin, it’s almost as if, as Othello says, ocular proof, you know? He sees it, rendtions of what it is she’s mentioned. Her being a kumiho. Him seeing a shoggoth. Him dealing with the Sons of Adam… And so, the manifestation of all these things, he takes extremely seriously — and is trying not to until the code is broken. It’s such a private war.

… We’re at the halfway point, you know? We’re just about to tip into what I call the answer sequence. At least, that’s how I viewed it, in working on it. Atticus had his first question answered at the end of [Episode] 5. He decodes something. He finds something out. He gets proof there for himself, you know? Okay, “Die.” And “How did you know?!” [to Ji-Ah].

TVLINE | I noticed before that you stopped short of saying that Ji-Ah was his first love.
I absolutely think it is his first foray into love. I think I interrupted my thought. I wasn’t choosing not to say it.

TVLINE | Ah, OK.
She is, and that’s the most confusing thing. Because in [Episode] 5, he feels as if he’s in love with Leti, you know? And she asks, “Were you in love with her?” I don’t know.

I’ve experienced that a person’s love, whenever you encounter love, you don’t really know what it is until it’s gone. As cliché as it sounds, it’s cliché because it’s true. I just got done with a breakup a little over five days ago.

TVLINE | Oh my God. Wow.
You kind of go, “Man, I really did [love that person].” Or, “Maybe I didn’t. It’s really that question. I think, in time, it’s really only after the next lover or the next foray that you can really put into clarity what it is you had before. Especially so young. Especially when you’re at the juvenilia of your amorous encounters. [Laughs]

TVLINE | Which brings me to my next question: I love that when we saw him with Leti, up against the wall in the bathroom in Episode 3, he seemed so self-assured. And then we get to this episode, in which Tic has sex for the first time ever, and I’m like, “Honey, you barely know what’s going on, yourself!”
[Laughs] Yeah. Yeah yeah yeah. [Laughs]

TVLINE | Atticus has shown himself to be someone who can adapt and roll with things rather quickly. But in that last scene with Ji-Ah, he cannot handle what happens. I mean, obviously, it’s a huge shock.
Right.

TVLINE | But in the pantheon of things he’s run into since, it’s not even that bad!
Right! [Laughs] I mean, that’s the great part about this episode, because [in earlier episodes] you go, “Why is he not tripping at this moment?” The first thing one needs to understand about Atticus is that Atticus was a Black soldier in the Korean War. The Korean War was horrendous. And it wasn’t televised. There’s just memoirs about it. The Coldest Winter [by David Halberstam] is something I kept in my trailer and would read over and over and over, and before this episode shot, I actually went to Hawaii and lived in a cave, and just read this book, you know? That and…what was the other book? Letters to a Young Poet [by Rainer Maria Rilke].

TVLINE | Back up a second. You lived in a cave?
Yeah, in Hawaii. I went hiking, and I stayed in this cave, and I was on a hiatus.

TVLINE | Wow. I’m sorry to belabor the point, but were you camping in the cave? Was it tricked out, or was it just rock, you and your sleeping bag?
Yeah, that. I was kicking it, you know? It was safe, I mean, it was civil. But that’s what I was doing.

TVLINE | Wow. OK, continue.
So I knew that, going into this episode, that it was important that we show Tic — this is actually the first time you see Tic, right? Once the show starts, he’s Atticus the entire time. You see flashes of Tic when he really gets into it with his father, the boy in him, but he’s a boy when he’s in war, you know? And if you remember the very beginning of the pilot, they’re running through the trenches and killing, but taking life is not an easy thing, and not something that people do.

It’s quite unnatural, especially in that way, with machinery. And so, in this episode, he’s being deflowered in all the ways. When you meet him, he does seem stoic, and a little tough, but also, like, an easy cry. But that’s because he’s holding on to all those things. It’s stuck in his body.

TVLINE | Tell me about the scene Ji-Ah’s tails start to attack Tic.
At at one point, I’m literally holding these green tentacles. And Jamie is struggling with them, and we’re anchoring each other. And then she’s holding onto my arms — and Jamie’s a very, a petite lady, and I’m not necessarily a petite fellow — so she’s holding onto me, and pulling like mad.

And I’m, like, doing the machine almost, like, doing the exercise. [Laughs] And she’s wrestling with them, and they say “Cut,” and I let them go, and she falls back, and I fall back. [Laughs] Bam! And it’s, “OK. All right, we go again.” It was fun. It’s really the most ridiculous and artful thing you can do, you know, because it’s so serious, right, because you’re dealing with bodies, and emotions, and all these things. And then you’re adding this element of, like, “Now there’s tentacles!” [Laughs] You know?

TVLINE | Last week, the audience got a huge revelation: That Atticus’ father, Montrose, is in a relationship with Sammy. What can you tell us about how Atticus might encounter that when/if he finds out?
I know how… [Laughs]

TVLINE | What can you tell us without spoiling anything?
There are things in life that I’m quick to say… “You hurt me, it’s fine. Fine. I’ll roll with it.” [But] you hurt someone I love? It’s fire and brimstone. So, in that same way with Atticus, the terrible things that have happened to me as Atticus, I can handle that. At least, I think I can. [Laughs] That’s about me, and only about me. When you bring in my Number One attachment — I would say Montrose is his primary attachment. If you start f—king with that, that shakes the foundation of the human being that can take it on the chin when it has to do with him.

And so, with this secret, there are going to be repercussions because of that. It’s interesting as we move forward with that discussion, and is it a matter of social stigma? Is it a matter of familial sanctity?

And where is [Atticus] catching his feelings from, you know? The taboo-ness of it, or the fact that your father… I mean, let’s just think about that, your father holding something so personal and dear from you as his offspring, you know?

 

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Welcome to Sanctum, a one-of-a-kind virtual reality experience that celebrates and complements Lovecraft Country. In “An American Dream,” the second of three events inspired by the world of the series, become a part of a live poetry performance inspired by the words of James Baldwin, adapted by Lovecraft Country writer Shannon Houston, and performed by Jurnee Smollett (Leti Lewis).

 

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Meet me in Daegu reminded me of The Terror Season 2. The show is ok. Only 4 episodes left in season 1. I'm going to give it a chance and hope the story starts coming together. If not, deuces.
 

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When they were running promos for this show for months, it looked interesting with some of the imagery like that building imploding.

So far, these memorable imagery has come from the first couple of episodes.

Though certainly they are trying hard, like the scenes of the skin sloughing off in the Ruby episode or the fox tails surging out of the orifices of the naked Asian woman.

Is this imagery consistent with Lovecraft? Haven't read him so have no idea.
 

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What... the... F... ? I have no idea what to make of that episode.
 
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I mean those contraptions that Hippolyta was fiddling around with looked like something out of Lovecraft?

Maybe retro futurism?

I think the show runner just wants to do these elaborate set pieces with what are suppose to be memorable imagery and somehow fit them together into a story. Went back to Josephine Baker in Paris but then fast forwarded to Pattie Labelle song.

Beyonce track must be coming up soon before the end of the season.
 

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This is one crazy, wild show. It is all over the place covering tons of stuff. I absolutely hate when a show drags a story line on for season after season but I am not sure I am a fan of the way they are doing this show. It might work great in a novel or something but not sure this is transitioning well to a TV format.
 

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Discussion Starter #154
The excerpt from Sun Ra's film 'Space Is the Place' in the concluding scene :: Sun Ra was someone who created his own mythical name and persona in an effort to reclaim a sense of power over his identity and place in the world :: “You don’t exist in this society, If you did your people wouldn’t be seeking equal rights. You’re not real. If you were real you’d have some status amongst the nations of the world. So we’re both myths. I do not come to you as a reality. I come to you as the myth because that’s what black people are—myths.”

'Book of Names', the most sought after item .. the act of naming something or assuming a name, is having a hand in it's creation .. this episode was about the power of names ..

The show is certainly ethereal and attempts to promote a deeper dive into the mythos presented ..

Sometimes, I think you have to study something in order to gain an understanding .. normally, I don't particularly like those kind of shows .. I like a more cut an dried approach .. but, I'm not against thought provoking shows, of which "Lovecraft" excels, IMO .. it's a testament to the times we live ..
 

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I'll be honest, I let out a big laugh when the glowing space lady with the giant triangle-shaped afro came on screen, but I think the episode kind of made it work. At least, it seemed to fit with the goofy "space mission" scene later.

I do want to give this show credit for finding ways to take seemingly tertiary characters and suddenly giving them prominence in the story.

The series is just all over the place, though. So far, it's gone from Get Out to The Goonies to Altered States all in the same season.
 

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The excerpt from Sun Ra's film 'Space Is the Place' in the concluding scene
I'm getting really annoyed by all the audio excerpts over unrelated scenes. The first time it happened was kind of interesting and unusual, but now it just feels forced, like important scenes are being interrupted just to shoehorn in this dumb gimmick.
 

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There was a lot of hate for this last episode. It's not shared by me. Was it a letdown from last week's episode? Yes. Was it awful like anything from GoT season 8 or True Detective season2? No. Was it just meh like every season of WestWorld? Maybe.

I didn't care for the spaceship alien thing, but I did enjoy Hippolyta's journey in that simulator. I really liked Aunjanue Ellis's monologue about gender, race, and conformity whilst being Queen Mother Yaa Asantewaa.

I'm definitely hoping all the anthological side tangents that are performing wonderful feats of world-building and character development will somehow tie into the larger plot. I am definitely digging the show. But, like most of you, I really want a cohesive plot.
 

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I'm caught up through episode five. As a book reader I can now say I have absolutely no idea what's going to happen. The show retains some core story elements (like the ghosts in Leti's boarding house, the magic booby-trapped vault, and the Ruby transformation), but alters them drastically while making significant changes to key characters, like Montrose and the Crosthwaites, and adding Ji-Ah. It's pretty wild, but I'm really enjoying it so far. Looks incredible on my new LG OLED TV, though it's not in 4K/HDR.
 

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From WaPo,

Jamie Chung is used to playing guest roles. ‘Lovecraft Country’ made her want to lead.

It took Jamie Chung 10 years to find Ji-Ah. Now that she has, the actress isn’t letting her go.
Rarely does a TV guest star get a full hour of a series to herself. Rarer still is that opportunity for Asian actresses, woefully underrepresented in Hollywood, for whom these roles just don’t come around often. So when Chung, the 37-year-old actress who has been working in Hollywood for a decade, landed the role of Ji-Ah in HBO’s trippy sci-fi drama “Lovecraft Country,” it was like “a piece of gold.”

 
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