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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 2 Definitive Tech STS hooked up to the 1st sub out (LFE on STS) and an external 12" powered sub in the front right/center side hooked up to the 2nd sub out on my Onkyo 3007 receiver.


I have a theater room with two row seating. The first row is closest to the front speakers. Second row is furthest back, with raised flooring about 10" higher.


My first row is not that strong on bass, while the second row is very strong. You can hear it it strong on any of the rear seating. I tried angles on the 12" sub with no help. Don't want to change the toe on the STS due to the vocals filling the room.


Any suggestions? I'm going to try to raise the 12" sub with some yellow page books since the sub is located inside a cabinet. Other any that, I do who what else to try.
 

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You must experiment with either moving the sub's location or the seating locations. You would probably find it immensely helpful if you could take some in-room measurements to compare against so you'd be able to better assess what/where your problems lay. If nothing else play some sweeps and listen to them from each seated position or better yet play specific tones with an SPL meter in hand. If I were to just blindly guess at your room's current layout, I'd guess the front row is in the center of the room with the back row very near the back wall... if that is indeed the case then plan on moving both seating rows forward a couple feet or so.
 

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Is your back row against the wall? If so, this is a very common effect of bass, it is very powerful along the walls and corners but leaves the middle of the room pretty bass deprived. It sound like your front row seating is in a bass null. There is two ways to fix this situation: either use near field placement with the subwoofers next to the front row seats, or get subwoofers that can properly pressurize that room.


Also, there could be another effect in play where risers for the second row are just absorbing vibration which is felt in the seats and giving the imitation of bass, however you are still stuck with the problem that the room is not sufficiently pressurized. How large is your room? I'm guessing a single 12" is not enough for it.
 

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The problem is the STS speakers, DefTechs built in subs should never ever be considered "true" subwoofers. Trust me I have a pair of BP7001s and use the built in 10" 1500 watt subs as mid bass subs, because anything below 30hz and they fall like a rock. Your outboard sub is obviously handling the lower frequencies way better than the STS subs. Your best bet is to hook up the speakers via speaker wire only and that's it and set the speakers to small with a crossover of 40hz. This way you'll get tighter louder cleaner mid bass out of those speakers and it's not straining trying to reproduce frequencies it can't handle. You'll get the benefit of great mid bass out of your speakers and low bass out of the outboard sub. Save your money for another sub up front if you need even more bass.


Trust me those STS cannot keep up with a decent outboard sub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for everyones reply. Yes, it turned out that my back row was getting more bass because if it being next to the wall. The front row was bass deprived.

I went ahead and raised the 12" sub and it made a HUGE difference. It turned out by raising the sub, filled the middle.

I went and built a platform (misc wood parts from home depot-cost less than $5!) Raised it to my max of 4.5inches and now its perfect.

I wonder if lifting the subs off the floor corrects this effect with all woofers?
 
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