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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please don't laugh at me. I already get 2 wide band component input on my TV. I use one for HDTV, the other one for SDTV, S VHS VCR, and an old interlace DVD player thru an iScan pro. The problem is I am planning to buy a progressive scan DVD player and the iScan won't bypass 480p signal. That means I need a A/B switch type for the extra component input.


I check on onecall's website and they sell a JVC brand switch for about $600. That's a lot of money. I also saw a A/B switch for composite video, left and right audio at Radio Shack for less than $20. The question is: Can I buy the Radio Shack switch for component inputs eventhough its is not sold for that purpose ? I can save close to $600 and use that money to buy other equipment.


I am willing to spend up to about $100 for the switch if that will do the job better than the Radio Shack switch.


Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Thank you Engine-Ear


I must have missed that thread. I think I will go with the Radio Shack solution. It sounds like it is already "proven" technology.
 

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I've been using the Rat Shack switch for many months now with no problems, although I've wondered if it could cause an impedence anomaly in the bandwidth response of the component cables? Are we dealing with basically audio voltages or is the bandwidth into RF? Just curious, in case there might be some real technoids lurking about http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif

John in VA
 

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If it works for you then it works for you!

To answer some of the questions that were asked....

Video is routed in a 75 ohm environment. Whenever the impedance is not 75 ohms, there is a discontinuity in the line and signal reflections are setup. Whether the discontinuity is significant enough to cause a visible problem in your image is the unknown. Switches that maintain constant impedance are typically much more expensive than just a simple switch. If you opened the RS switch and found it wired with single wires instead of coax or microstrip lines, then it is unlikely they are trying to maintain a constant impedance. The instruments necessary to characterize a switch like this are quite expensive, a TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) or a VNA ( Vector Network Analyzer). That is why the switchers by Extron are as expensive as they are. They have bandwidths that go to 350 MHz.


..Doyle
 
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