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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure everyone on the forums has noticed dust build up on their projector lenses over time. The usual caveat is to avoid cleaning if at all possible. Every time you clean the lens, you will damage it. The anti-glare coating is endangered and you may even grind visible scratches into the lenses. Wet soak cleaning is probably the least damaging, but that simply isn't practical with our projector lenses.


So, we're left with dry compressed air to remove dust and as a last resort careful use of cleaning solutions like that created by William Phelps. Unfortunately, compressed air simply doesn't remove all the dust. Some remains on the lens surface and even when one uses cleaning solution to float the dust and reduce scratch risk, that dust can grind the lens with every cleaning. A very light touch with an ultra soft and clean natural fiber brush can reduce that residual dust and minimize damage risk. Unfortunately, store purchases brushes aren't always clean. They are also expensive enough that one is tempted to use them too long. Before you know it, you're cleaning your precious lenses with a grit embeded brush. Even storage of the brush can be problematic. Lying loose in a drawer, a brush picks up whatever detritous enters. Storage in a ziplock bag helps, but inevitably you end up with an expensive brush that you should throw out but keep on using. Here's my solution - a low cost, renewable brush.


You'll need to gather the appropriate materials, but it's all readily available in every town. Just look carefully, follow these directions and you'll soon be on your way to lens cleaning bliss. The results will be superior to commercial brushes and cheap enough to avoid the temptation to keep the brush longer than a single use.


Handle: You need a handle for the brush. A wooden dowel or plastic rod five to 6 inches long is about right. Too long a handle risks accidental contact of the brush against surfaces other than the lens. You really want to avoid contaminating the brush.


Wire Twist Tie: You need this to secure the fibers to your handle.


Heavy duty aluminum foil: This is formed around the handle and fibers to direct and bundle the fibers of the brush. Aluminum foil works because it contains no soluble elements which could leach into the fibers. It is also pliable enough to safely shape by hand. Remember, heavy duty foil is needed. Regular foils is too fragile!


Bristles: Natural fibers are soft and less likely to scratch lens coatings than synthetic fibers. You can find a ready supply on your girlfriend or wife. Examine it carefully and be sure it is very fine hair. If it is too coarse, coworkers are another source to pursue. You don't need much. Obtain a bundle about one inch in diameter and two inches long. Get only one bundle at a time. Stored bundles gather dust and become tangled. One complication to avoid is the presence of hair care products such as conditioners. Have her shampoo three times with Dawn dishwashing detergent immediately prior to you cutting your bundle. Dawn will remove all conditioners and natural oils. Hair grows back so you can always get more.


While the hair bundle is damp and easy to handle, tie one end securely to your handle with a wire twist tie. About an 1/2 inch of overlap is sufficient. Next, wind a 1 inch strip of aluminum foil over the overlap of handle and hair. Shape the fibers as a brush, then use a pair of clean, sharp scissors to trim the end evenly.


Rinsh the brush copiously with anhydrous alcohol. Don't use rubbing alcohol because rubbing alcohol may contains fragrances which can contaminate the fibers. Finally, rinse five times with DISTILLED water. Shake the brush dry, but do not touch the fibers! Allow the brush to dry by hanging it down and using a blow drier.


You now have a renewable lens cleaning brush of much higher quality and safety than you can buy. Unfortunately, you're also now in the dog house, sleeping on the couch, been fired from your job, or have the police knocking on your door. :D
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Guy Kuo
Just to be clear. The above is in jest. Don't actually do it.
im very relieved to hear that! I'd hate to know that my money contributed to such a state of mind! :D


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Right - my girlfriend is bald, and has left me. :(


And now I see it was all a joke - couldn't it have waited till April??



But on the bright side, I have the cleanest lens in all the land!! :)



Gary.
 

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Guy,


You are way too serious to be doing this.


You should have added that if you implant the hair in the wooden spoon just right, it will grow by itself. That way every few weeks when you need to clean your lens all you do is cut down the bristles on your living brush.


Also natural blond hair works better than brunette hair, so always ask the lady before you cut wether she is natural or is just a dye job. Go up to random women in a department store with a big pair of scissors and ask them if they are natural blonde or not.


-Mr. Wigggles


At all costs don't use red head hair for bristles, guaranteed to scratch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by MrWigggles
....Go up to random women in a department store with a big pair of scissors and ask them if they are natural blonde or not...


:D
 

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Hair from a fresh wood floor of course would not be good either I presume? not straight enough.
 

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On a serious note, how many people obtain a clear camera filter and screw that onto their projector to protect the lens. I thought of doing this. Would this present a problem.
 

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I have found that the hair from her head is just too straight and stiff. I have further perfected a technique by not even removing hair from the donor speciment at all. Bush swabbing can be used for more than just cleaning lenses. Try it on a variaty of household items, even yourself!
 
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