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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I have an audio track of two persons that are talking to each other, but one of the person sounds very loud and the other person sounds very low. I tried to solve this by using the compression method in Audacity, the audio did improve but one of the voices is still way too loud sometimes and the other voice sounds too low.

 

I have a 45 min audio file with two guys talking with each other. I would be really happy if someone could fix this for me. :)
 

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if playing this through a home cinema...not possible as voices come from the center channel and it is mixed that way on pupose, or just poorly mixed.


Put it through a movie maker software, like windows movie maker, separate the voices and adjust the volumes yourself.


Otherwise not much you can do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by McStyvie  /t/1522929/lower-db-to-x-if-its-over-10#post_24492637


if playing this through a home cinema...not possible as voices come from the center channel and it is mixed that way on pupose, or just poorly mixed.


Put it through a movie maker software, like windows movie maker, separate the voices and adjust the volumes yourself.


Otherwise not much you can do.
 

Not sure what you mean really. It must be possible to lower the dB whenever it reaches too high. Separating the voices manually would take a few hours. I would not like to do that...
 

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Dynamic volume control from something like Audyssey may help.


A compressor will limit the loud voice and you may be able to bring up the soft voice somewhat, but generally there is only so much you can do. Heavy compression leads to other artifacts like the noise floor rising and falling with the voices, often distracting. I do not know what processing is in current DAWs and programs like Audacity but this is a common issue so you might try an Audacity forum. There may be a way to do it directly, or a plug-in that helps (there are plug-ins for ProTools, not sure about Audacity).


As suggested above, you can always manually adjust the volume for the softer voice, natch, given time and inclination.


Getting the mic position wrong at the start of an interview is a problem that can haunt one for a long time...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50  /t/1522929/lower-db-to-x-if-its-over-10#post_24492750


Dynamic volume control from something like Audyssey may help.


A compressor will limit the loud voice and you may be able to bring up the soft voice somewhat, but generally there is only so much you can do. Heavy compression leads to other artifacts like the noise floor rising and falling with the voices, often distracting. I do not know what processing is in current DAWs and programs like Audacity but this is a common issue so you might try an Audacity forum. There may be a way to do it directly, or a plug-in that helps (there are plug-ins for ProTools, not sure about Audacity).


As suggested above, you can always manually adjust the volume for the softer voice, natch, given time and inclination.


Getting the mic position wrong at the start of an interview is a problem that can haunt one for a long time...

+1.. If it needs huge compression, the compression itself will inevitably sound bad.


But if they don't talk over each other, and you have time to do the work, you have a volume control in Audacity, right? You can turn it up 10 dB or whatever when quiet guy talks, and turn it back down when loud guy talks (even 20 dB if needed). It will have fewer artifacts than using a compressor, but will take some time . . . and maybe more than one try to get the volume changes to occur at the right time.
 

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^^^ That's what I have done in the primordial past, rode the volume control. I also used a bandpass filter to reduce noise pumping (not a complete panacea) by filtering out all but a fairly narrow audio (voice) band. Seems like I have read about vocal processing plug-ins that might help but I have no experience with them.
 

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Although it's not my first instrument, I imagine myself to be a pretty good bass player. At least I come up with interesting (to me) lines. But when I have to make that sucker lay right where it needs to be in the mix, sometimes there's an outlier or two that I just can't reign in with a compressor (without sucking the life out of other parts of the, uh, part. So I compress to get the thing in the right ball park and then go take down the "oops played way too hard" notes "by hand" (which can mean several different things in a digital audio workstation, but in the end is turning it down). Same with a note that i whiffed on - -if it needs to come up, I can pull it up. Of course with those kinds of limited changes, SNR seldom is an issue at all, just because the volume increase or decrease is so brief (and there's so much other stuff going on) that the noise level just doesn't intrude.


I can play an acoustic or electric guitar part, or a piano part, that doesn't require anywhere near that much intensive level fixing. Part of that's, I suspect, because of how much differently we perceive the fundamentals of those bass guitar notes as long ago identified by Fletcher and Munson. Part of it's because I'm a better piano player and guitarist than bassist. But don't tell the folks who hire me to play bass on their gigs that . . . .
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JHAz  /t/1522929/lower-db-to-x-if-its-over-10#post_24495417


If it needs huge compression, the compression itself will inevitably sound bad.

Agreed, though by carefully setting attack and release times he might be able to solve the problem with compression.
Quote:
You can turn it up 10 dB or whatever when quiet guy talks, and turn it back down when loud guy talks (even 20 dB if needed).

Exactly. Most DAW software lets you easily draw volume automation. That's not as easy as having a compressor do it, but it's not insurmountable either.


--Ethan
 
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