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Discussion Starter #1
Is it possible someone could give me a clear definition of this?


My speakers are set to crossover at 80Hz. I therefore assume that any frequencies below this are set to the sub.


However, what is the LPF? I'm trying to understand the difference between the two and there doesn't appear to be any clear answers.


Thank you.
 

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Low Pass Filter. It sets the LFE channel filter. The LFE track goes up to 120hz, this allows you to set it up to 120hz, or keep it around 80hz, or where ever you want it set. It's different than at what point the other five channels are cut off at. The LPF only refers to the LFE or .1 track. The others set each of the other five or seven speakers cut-off point.


-K
 

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Discussion Starter #3
!!! I know what it stands for but I would like to know what is the difference between bass that gets rolled of from the main speakers to the sub and this setting.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seth912 /forum/post/12931545


Is it possible someone could give me a clear definition of this?


My speakers are set to crossover at 80Hz. I therefore assume that any frequencies below this are set to the sub.


However, what is the LPF? I'm trying to understand the difference between the two and there doesn't appear to be any clear answers.


Thank you.

The difference between "what two" ?


I am unclear what you are asking. Receivers have various bass management options, crossover freq. is one of them. I would guess though, that the usual case is that audio from the LFE channel is sent to your sub. Also, all audio below the x-over frequency will get sent to your sub regardless of source (technically, not all audio below that frequency, there's overlap etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hopefully I can explain my question clearer. Thanks for the response...


my main speakers are set to 80Hz on the receiver. I therefore assume any signal below this gets sent to the sub.


Do CDs, DVDs and other sound have another 'channel' (like the left or right) that is reserved PURELY for LFE? If so, then why would anyone want the option to change the LPF? I mean wouldn't you want all the sound coming from that channel to be sent to the sub because I guess it wouldn't be able to go anywhere else.
 

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DVDs, for example, do have a dedicated LFE channel. Depending on your settings, that can be sent directly to your sub. I can't say this for sure for every receiver, but it's probably not subjected to any crossover. The crossover is for other channels, so you can have your sub handle low frequencies. Hope that clears things up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seth912 /forum/post/12931788


Hopefully I can explain my question clearer. Thanks for the response...


my main speakers are set to 80Hz on the receiver. I therefore assume any signal below this gets sent to the sub.


Do CDs, DVDs and other sound have another 'channel' (like the left or right) that is reserved PURELY for LFE? If so, then why would anyone want the option to change the LPF? I mean wouldn't you want all the sound coming from that channel to be sent to the sub because I guess it wouldn't be able to go anywhere else.

CD's don't have an LFE channel. Most DVD sound tracks include an LFE channel. That's the .1 in 5.1 or 7.1. LFE is cut off at 120Hz when a disk is produced. It's my understanding that the LPF value is there to smooth the transition so it isn't brick wall filtered.


Bottom line is you're worrying about something that has very little effect on the sound of your system. Set it to the maximum value if you don't want to lose anything. If it sounds worse at that value or you start picking up hum, set it back to 80.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Perfect! Thank you.


I therefore guess that the LPF is not relevant to CDs?


Also, assuming all LFE channel signal is 120Hz and below then why would you set your sub to 80hz? Seems silly to miss out on that 40hz of sound!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seth912 /forum/post/12931889


Perfect! Thank you.


I therefore guess that the LPF is not relevant to CDs?


Also, assuming all LFE channel signal is 120Hz and below then why would you set your sub to 80hz? Seems silly to miss out on that 40hz of sound!

What kind of receiver do you have? It's hard to know if this advice applies to you without knowing that.


In any event, the LPF of LFE on Onkyo's is not relevant to CD's since they don't have LFE.


As far as missing out on anything, there's very little recorded above 80Hz in the LFE channel so setting the LPF to 80 doesn't really throw much away. Try it and see for yourself if you can hear a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have an Onkyo 605. It allows you to set the crossover of all speakers and it has an LPF of LFE option.


I'm assuming that as the receiver handles bass then I can set my sub (B&W 610) crossover all the way up, or switch the out option, which - I believe - basically disables the crossover knob on the sub, therefore the sub puts out any bass the receiver sends it.
 

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Low pass and high pass bass management filters are not absolute or cut offs. You will still have frequency information passed from your receiver past the crossover point with rolloff depending on the slope of the crossover--how much attentuation per octave.


Regards,

Will
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seth912 /forum/post/12931889


Perfect! Thank you.


I therefore guess that the LPF is not relevant to CDs?


Also, assuming all LFE channel signal is 120Hz and below then why would you set your sub to 80hz? Seems silly to miss out on that 40hz of sound!

also your speakers are better suited to handle 80hz and above since it has

a feeling of localization.
 
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