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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The manual does not expain much about what "Native" mode is?


I see 2 benefits....


1. Smaller picture. For me this is a benefit because it allows moving the projector further back where I can mount it easier. This also moves the noise slightly behind the viewer instead of right above the viewer's head.


2. I have a 16:9 screen. In "Native" mode with Aspect Ratio set to Normal, a 4:3 picture fits on the 16:9 screen with the black bars on the side. The screen is filled to the top and bottom. Switching to Cinema (still in Native) fills the entire screen. I like this better than using a 4:3 screen and then having the picture shrink for 16:9.


What are the drawbacks of using Native mode? Am I loosing resolution?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Seems like using a smaller portion of the LCD panel would give me less resolution but I have not really looked at this technology. Can you explain a little more? Thanks.
 

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If you only have 640 x 480 of information, you only have 640 x 480 of information. You can dispaly that information on 1024 x 720, but you are really not adding any resolution to the image. Native mode displays the 640 x 480 as 640 x 480, instead of scaling it up.
 

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LT150 can't display the native resolution if the input is not RGB, right?


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CKL
 

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The LT150 displays S-video in native mode.
 

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Using native mode bypasses the internal scaling which can be a good thing. You are not really losing resolution, because you are displaying all information present. Since you are only using a smaller portion of the LCD panel, you are losing brightness.
 

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The LT150 can display ANY input (<=XGA) in "native" mode. Choose to set your desktop to 800x600 (SVGA) and the diplay will use the center of the DMD (this is not an LCD projector).


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Huck
 

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Does that mean that a 4:3 DVD movie will almost fit on a 16:9 screen without moving the LT150 if you switch to SVGA for full screen movies?


1024 x 576 is used for widescreen movies with XGA, right?

800 x 600 for 4:3 movies with SVGA?


Randy
 

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600 lines will overlap (12 above and 12 below) if the screen is set up for 576. 640x480 would fit onto the screen but would yield letter and window boxes (black bars on all sides).


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Huck
 

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Sure, it is viable. I was just saying that IF you have the screen set up to be perfect for 1024x576, when you use SVGA (800x600), the picture will overshoot the top and bottom by 12 lines each way. You will also have the black bars on the sides.


As for where to display that LT150, choose an empty wall and have fun. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif When I first got a projector, I was amazed by how good I could focus/converge a set of 7" CRTs on a mauve colored wall. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif The LT150 should be easier since it is so much smaller. Just point, focus and have fun.


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Huck
 

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I was thinking of those with homemade 16:9 screens. For instance, instead of a 80 x 45 screen, you could make it 80 x 47 (46.875). Most films are 1.85:1 and will leave little black bars on a 16:9 screen anyway, correct? This would add roughly an inch of black bar to the top and bottom of the example screen.


For the rare (in my case) 4:3 film, using SVGA resolution would fill the screen from top to bottom with black bars on the sides. You would sacrifice resolution, but wouldn't have to relocate the projector. Does this seem like a viable setup? Then use "Native" for NTSC sources?


Randy D


P.S. I have the LT-150, but nowhere to display it yet.
 
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