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What the hell does that mean? :D
 

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When you activate your receiver with Dish, they "marry" the card to that receiver. After that, the card will only work in that reciever. This will prevent you from pulling the card, taking it to a friend's house, putting it in his receiver and watching HBO (which he doesn't subscribe to and you do). You can "un-marry" (divorce) your card also. They will only do that if you are moving the card to a new receiver which they will immediately "marry".


-Robert
 

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A virgin DirecTV conditional access system card initializes ("marries") to the first powered receiver it's inserted in. It does not require activation by DirecTV to do this. As a matter of signal security, DirecTV will no longer reactivate a formerly married card to another receiver. DirecTV's current policy for over a year is to issue another card to the subscriber and credit part or all of its cost upon return and verification of the old card.
 

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Ray H

A virgin DirecTV conditional access system card initializes ("marries") to the first powered receiver it's inserted in.


Yes in the old days with the F and H cards.

This is no longer true with the HU.



DirecTV will no longer reactivate a formerly married card to another receiver. DirecTV's current policy for over a year is to issue another card to the subscriber and credit part or all of its cost upon return and verification of the old card.


Again not real true.

Yes if you have an H card they will not reactivate it to your

new receiver, This is even true if the card is now in current use

by you and you just want it in a new receiver.


If you have an HU card and it was yours from the start

(Your Account) they will reactivate to a new receiver.
 

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Tech support now-a-days are the only CSR that will marry a card(HU) to another receiver. Also once the card is activated to one person there is NOT possible to transfer that card to another person. The card lives and dies under one name.



Married would also mean that the card has been matched with the receiver. Both the card and the receiver have a unique number and they are matched in DirecTVs computer as an authorized unit with xxxx programming.



Dave
 

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If your going to sell or give away a D* IRD the new owner has o buy a new card.

Quote:
We charge the new owner $39 for the new access card, but we issue a $29 credit if the new owner returns the old access card and the card is in good condition. So, after the credit, the new owner has only paid $10 for the new card. We send the new card via Federal Express, along with a postage-paid envelope to make returning the old card easy.
From DirecTV FAQ


Steve
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Diode1
...This is no longer true with the HU. ... If you have an HU card and it was yours from the start (Your Account) they will reactivate to a new receiver.
Diode, I was speaking from VERY personal experience. When I received my used DTC100, DirecTV refused to activate its formerly subscribed card under my account. No surprise there, but I figured it couldn't hurt to ask. However, quite surprisingly, DirecTV also refused to re-initialize my then currently subscribed Hughes receiver's card to the DTC100. No amount of stroking, schmoozing, or cajoling, with three CSRs and a supervisor would persuade them to budge. They insisted that I HAD to buy a new access card for $89.00 and would be granted a $39.00 credit upon return of the DTC100's original card. Later in the conversation one of them grudgingly offered to "up" the return credit to $50.00. Only after I finally threatened to take my business to Dish Network did they relent and waive the final $39.00 replacement charge difference. While I was satisfied with the no-charge outcome, to call this nearly 1-hour encounter frustrating would be an understatement. When I received my bright shiny new HU card the next day for the DTC100, I immediately plugged it in to the card slot and tuned to DirecTV's barker channel 100. I then had to call DirecTV to activate it to my account. Once I was transferred to an accounts CSR, the first thing out of her mouth was, "Oh, I see you've already plugged your new card in." I asked her how she knew, and she replied, "It initialized to your receiver as soon as you plugged it in." She then instructed me to tune to channel 100 to verify reception, requested my receiver and card serial numbers, and, presto - I had my customary programming tier activated.
 

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Ray, when did you have this experience. It sounds a lot more like the old way they were handling cards than the current way. And, unless your receiver had dialed in to the system to dump PPV's, there is absolutely no way they could know that you had the new one installed. The phone line is the *only* means they have to know something like that.


Current policy on cards is that DirecTV (unless they chaged it yet again in the last 30 days) will not remarry cards. Period. Don't believe the guy on eBay who says they will. He is not telling you the truth and I have tried to get eBay to make him change his ads.


With used equipment, as long as DirecTV does not have reason to believe there is anything fraudulent or illegal with the transaction, they will sell you a new card for $20 and send it to you by FedEx. Simple as that. When you get it, you call them and activate it. If you don't activate it, they charge you a fine (I think).


If you are an existing customer who gets new equipment, you activate the new stuff with the card it came with (or get a new card for it for $20) and then de-activate the old stuff. The cards still stay married to the IRD.


Now, what I don't know about is what happens when you sell your old equipment. What I *think* happens is that the new owner has to pay the 20 bucks and get a new card anyway because cards are also tied to accounts, but I don't know that for a fact yet.


Their web site has different, contradictory, information the last time I looked. I am going by my own recent experience and what has been explained to me by DirecTV itself.
 

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Mongo,


My little adventure with the used DTC100 occurred about a year ago. As for DirecTV "knowing" the card was plugged in and initialized, they can do some sort of multiplexed check simultaniously while you're in voice communication. The CSR said on two prior occasions when I initially activated the original Hughes receiver, and later its twin bedroom receiver that they were verifying land-based hookup while I was online. In fact with that bedroom receiver the CSR initially told me to plug the IRD in. I protested that it was plugged in, and she started to refute me when suddenly she apologized and said that my receiver finally acknowledged her "probe". The rest of your post agrees pretty much with my own experience, though it appears DirecTV's adjusted the replacement card resdual price lower. I have a hunch - and I'm definitely spitballing here - that the returned cards are checked for evidence of hacking or related damage. I wouldn't be surpised if the "fine" you spoke of could be assessed in either of these two cases, too. As a side note, I've read a number of posts on the hacker boards that when their hacked cards have been ECM'd or they damaged them themselves during hacking attempts, they call DirecTV and complain about a bad card and receive a new one via FedEx. What's disgruntling is that they don't have to pay (or so they say). If true, though, someone at DirecTV is asleep at the wheel. At the very least their credit card info should be collected, and if the old card is not forthcoming, they should be charged back full bore for the replacement card. IMHO. I also have a Kentucky windage hunch that if the returned cards are found to be righteous and in good working order, their CAM IDs may be removed from the deactivated card data base and those cards set aside for future use to new subscribers or as replacement cards, themselves. DirecTV obviously has the means to unmarry returned cards, and it would be ridiculous to summarily trash a perfectly usable card, but, they obviously would want to maintain some semblance of control over where a de-initialized card is going and how it's to be used.
 

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DirecTV can and has sent a signal for the receiver to download. Sort of a force download. The only catch is that sometimes it quick within a few seconds and sometimes it hours. I sometimes ask for a forced download on receivers after customers had them unplugged or someone messed with the lines ..... and check back with DirectTV the next day to verify Telco operation with them.


And yes a card is tied to one person and can't be changed so a person buying old equipment will need to order a new card.


As far a upgrading receivers and moving the old card to the new receiver, tech support will as long as it's a football (HU) card.


With the H cards dealers use to be able to send the cards off and have them cleaned. Meaning that that card having been married to one person would be sent off cleaned then it could be used again for another person. That cleaning would remove that account info from DirectVs database in turn allow a new account to be set up on with that card.. I haven't heard of such a legit channel for HU cards.


Dave
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by David Richardson
As far a upgrading receivers and moving the old card to the new receiver, tech support will as long as it's a football (HU) card.
Thanks, David, for a good deal of useful information. That particular quoted tidbit, though, does not jibe with my own experience. I believe a lot depends on their mood and whom you end up talking to. (Not all CSRs are actually DirecTV employees - they contract for the service to some extent, and, I still wonder whether some of the "CSRs" are prison and penitentiary inmates fulfilling work-study programs prior to parole or release...) One question - your reference to having a card cleaned - are you talking about sending the card off to DirecTV for this, or to an independent "contractor"? DirecTV takes a very dim view of the latter and has sent some rather strongly worded demand letters by registered mail (both for cessation and remuneration with the threat of civil action for non-compliance) from at least two legal teams on retention in Washington and Texas to suspected enduser hackers who've had their cards cleaned and/or hacked by unauthorized persons when DirecTV has found out about it through customer records seized during raids on suspected U.S.-based hacker-dealers. While U.S. DBS access cards, and activities concerning them, are currently considered as "not illegal" north of the border* (on the basis of several appellate court decisions), Canadian authorities have sporadically seized cards entering that country on the basis of missing or incomplete information regarding contents and value.


*This very issue will be the subject of a Canadian Supreme Court hearing on Tuesday, December 4, 2001.
 
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