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Quote:
Originally Posted by carbnjunkie /forum/post/0


Do you think I should try to even out the wear?


or can it not be done?

You'd need to reverse the image some how and theoretically play it for the same amount of time as caused the bars, which after a couple of years is thousands of hours.


Sorry, but I don't think it can be done practically.
 

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carbnjunkie,

Ouch! I'm sorry for your troubles. I think that replacing the green tube would be very expensive, and it might not be worth it.

Did that burn-in just appear overnight, or did you see it happening gradually? I like to watch a lot of older films and I don't like stretching the picture, and so far I don't see any evidence of burn-in after two and a half years of use(I have a 47" Panny). I have my brightness set to 19, and contrast to 18, so I don't think I'm overdriving the tubes.
 

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It was overnight. And I hate streching my 4.3 too, but I dont think that was the cause, im really dumbfounded. I would say 70 precent of the viewing I do is in 4.3.


The tv still does work, and if Im watching CNBC, or another show with dark screens, its fine. or keep it on 4.3, but that is going to make the problem worse.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolypoly /forum/post/0


Remedy to burn in:

If you can connect your PDP or RPTV to a computer, there is a program that is used by most manufacturers to try to 'fix' a burned in image.

The program is NTEST.exe from Nokia, You want to run the high voltage pattern on this test pattern program for about an hour or so and this should reduce or eliminate your existing burn in.


The premise of this program is similar to running a full white screen; but the act of toggling between dark/white screens ensures that you are running at a maximum voltage mode which 'drives' out burned in particles.


Has anybody tried this technique ?


Thanks,


Sade
 

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Thanks for the info in this thread. It helped me clear up some light burn in and I definitely know how to prevent it in the future now.


I bought a plasma two days ago and fell asleep last night with a DVD on. I woke up about four hours later with the menu screen slightly burned in. I used the "snow technique" for about 45 minutes today and it did clean up the burn in.


Just thought I'd let everyone know that it worked in the event that someone else, like me, has to learn the hard way about observing proper viewing habits.
 

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Hello, I have had a crt rear projection HDTV for a little under a year now. I play a lot of video games and want to reduce my chances of burn-in as much as possible. I generally will play 1 or 2 missions or levels in a game, then switch games or go back to tv for a while. I'm hoping this is enough to help me avoid burn in. I also make sure to stretch or zoom 4:3 content to fill the screen. my tv doesn't have a "contrast" but it has a "picture" setting which I assume is the same. I keep the picture setting at around 35-40% and the brightness around 50. Sometimes I'll increase one or the other if a particular game or movie is too dark.


Hopefully these things are enough. My last tv was rpcrt as well and the static parts of the HUD for the game Halo in 4 player split screen mode became burned in. I didn't notice it most of the time unless a very light color or white image was on the screen. Although with that tv, my friends and I played that game almost every night for 5-6 hours or more and nothing like that happens to my new tv.
 

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Hi John,


As far as tweakable menus, you CRT tv has a whole bunch that you cannot access.


I've had a Tosh 65H80 since Oct 2000. I use it as a PC, TV, and DVD player. It is on about an average of 6.5 hrs a day 7 days a week.


When I was researching this purchase which was about $7000CDN at that time. I was fortuneate enough to run into a site called www.keohi.com (hdtv section).


If you haven't heard of either the site or the importance of ISF Calibration (isf.com) before, particularly for CRT units I would run to this site and do some reading as well as find a "reputable tech" in your area and have your set optimized. (It will look like a different tv).


Aside from making you tv the envy of all your friends (no matter what they have) you will be protected from BURNIN.


I have just read the latest Christmas crop of AV Mags which discuss all the technologies. When it comes to CRTs Pros & Cons. The Pros are, 1)provides the best picture available from all technologies when properly calibrated. 2) At todays prices the most unbeleivable bargain out there.


The Cons are. 1) Very low WAF (wife acceptance factor) due to the fact that a large one like my 65" Tosh will dominate any room its in. If you buy a direct view 32'-36" its not an issue.


If you can designate a Media Room, (hdtv/pc(icl games), dvds, music) that won't interfere with things like having guests over for dinner and having to apologize for that ugly monster in the living room then you have it made.


Anyway, protect and optimize your investment by having it calibrated. Its well worth the couple of hundred bucks you'll pay. If you have a large screen rptv that can be protected from animals and youn childeren, I enthusiastically recommend reversing the screen stacks. Behind that shiney screen that you see the lamp beside you's reflection in, theres a non reflective matte screen behind it. Having your ISF tech reverse them while he's doing a mechanical focus on your red/green/blue guns. Thats when he loosens the wingnuts keeping the guns in place and through the use of an expensive scope and a piece of string, he tightens the focus of each gun to the center which makes it much tighter than done at the factory. To do this he has to unscrew the screen housing which is a good time to reverse the stacks.


Anyway, I hope I've peaked your interest in doing more than preventing Bunin.


Peter M.
 

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We noticed even if we watched a 16:9 format movies (such as DVDs", there are still black bars on the top and bottom. Do I need to worry about the burn-in for our TV (it's Toshiba 51" CRT RPTV). Thank you for your help.
 

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Hi,


Most Movie Directors film in the 2:35 aspect ratio. This puts black bars on the top and bottom. They are supposed to be there and some dvd boxes actually say that on the back of the box. Please don't stretch the picture to fill the screen it's like adding gingerale to a single malt scotch.


Unfortuneately if you have a 4:3 tv which puts black bars on the sides, a 2:35 film would have black bars all around it.


Older movies that were converted for wide screen tvs were done in 1:78 or 1:85 which will fill the whole screen of a 16:9 tv.


If your worried about burnin with those black bars don't. The best thing for your tv is to have it ISF calibrated ( www.isf.com ) and while waiting for the tech to show up, turn the brightness and contrast down to 50%. Making the room the tv is in as dark as possible will also help.


Peter M.
 

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Im sorry, but i cant find any info on the snow technique, can you guys help?


Also, should I try the nokia program for my burn-in problem? thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by petermwilson /forum/post/0


Hi,


Most Movie Directors film in the 2:35 aspect ratio. This puts black bars on the top and bottom. They are supposed to be there and some dvd boxes actually say that on the back of the box. Please don't stretch the picture to fill the screen it's like adding gingerale to a single malt scotch.


Unfortuneately if you have a 4:3 tv which puts black bars on the sides, a 2:35 film would have black bars all around it.


Older movies that were converted for wide screen tvs were done in 1:78 or 1:85 which will fill the whole screen of a 16:9 tv.


If your worried about burnin with those black bars don't. The best thing for your tv is to have it ISF calibrated ( www.isf.com ) and while waiting for the tech to show up, turn the brightness and contrast down to 50%. Making the room the tv is in as dark as possible will also help.


Peter M.


Thank you. Our TV is a 16:9 one. After reading some posts here, guess that shouldn't be a burn-in problem. After all, we watch TV more than watching DVD's. When we watch TV, this Toshiba TV provides a "smart zoom" feature which keep's the center unchanged but zooms the boundries.
 

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One thing I couldn't understand was we buy these 16:9 sets to watch HD Wide screen shows and they still put the black bars on the top and bottom... What is the point of it?
 

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Hi all, great site, lots of info. I'm this close to getting a plasma tv for the family but can't seem to find an answer to a pretty mundane question: Which set is going to produce the best SD picture? This is going to be our primary tv and my guess is that we'll only be using it to watch HD sources (DVD's, cable movies, broadcast sports events) about half the time. The other half we'll be watching standard definition programs from our local cable company (Cox). I understand more and more programs are being broadcast in HD, but in the meantime I'd like to have a set that can do a decent job with standard definition. I was in Tweeter last night and they had a few plasma sets tuned to an SD program and frankly the picture was terrible. Any thoughts? Thanks.
 

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I have had a Pioneer 55" standard definition RPTV for about 10 years or so, and I have never had burn in. I have used it for letterboxed movies extensively, I have used it at length for video games, and when my son is over every other weekend, he has it on cartoon channel for 12 hours at a stretch, and yet as far as the projection aspect of this TV, all I have had to do is clean the optics once or twice, and do a convergence once in a while. Perhaps I am lucky.
 

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My 2 year extended warranty will be up in a couple months....


This stinking burn in on my 55" mits is really distracting....


If I left this thing on for two months straight , could I cause something to break or burn-out and the guns be replaced ???


Am I under the thought that the guns are the parts that are "burned' and the rest of the set is fine ?
 

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I have a Sony KD-30XS955 on the way.



Can you explain if I need to be this concerned with this tv?


you guys are talking about Rear projection crt's


are the direct views diffrent?
 

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The personal anecdotes seem to be pretty helpful to others here, so I'll share my own experiences.


I had a Panasonic 4:3 RPTV for three years and I've had a Toshiba 16:9 RPTV for almost a year now. I play a good deal of video games and watch movies every now and then, and my viewing is naturally varied. I watch a lot of ESPN, a lot of network prime time, and record all sorts of stuff on my D* Tivo. My SD viewing (which I'd guess is around 25% now) is ALL done in stretch/zoom mode. My current set has had no more than forty hours TOTAL of viewing with 4:3 bars on the sides.


I have had absolutely no problem with burn-in on either set. The Panasonic was actually given to me for free because it had some issues, one of which was a slight burn-in of what looked like a DVD menu. I don't know what the heck the previous owners did to that set to cause the burn-in, but I couldn't replicate it. I tend to play video games in streaks and I may not change games for months at a time. This means that the same HUDs, gauges, bars, and meters are on the screen repetitively. Sometimes I have an hour to play a day, sometimes I may veg out and get in five hours in a day. Some days I don't play at all. None of these graphics ever burned in to either set, including the one that was evidently prone in the first place. I don't take lengthy breaks while playing, and on the rare occasion I do, I turn off the set.


I've never had my newer set calibrated, and the contrast is set around 50. No problems with it after almost a year and probably (I kid you not) over a hundred hours of Madden played on the Xbox.


The original post is right on the money about varying your viewing habits. I watch all types of stuff not because I feel compelled to, but because that's just the way it works out for me. I don't use the 4:3 mode except for the occasional video game or SD football game. Everything else I watch in SD is of so little importance that I really don't mind it being stretched (and Family Guy looks great stretched, anyway
). I guess I'm lucky in that everything I really want to watch is in 16:9.


From my own experience, you literally have to play video games or watch channels with tickers all day, everyday, to see burn-in. I have by no means abused my sets, but for the amount of time they've been in use, especially with video games, I've seen no problems. A little of this and a little of that, and you shouldn't have any problems.
 

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I've got a Toshiba 46H84 and recently I've started to notice some faint burn in. The odd thing is the burn is 2 seperate panels. A panel on the left side and a panel on the right side. The panels are seperated by a thin 2 or 3 inch strip down the middle of the screen. So if you can imagine a strip of located on the side where a 4:3 side panel would be then a burn in strip down the middle... like 2 seperate panels.


Does anyone know what would cause that? I never watch anything that isn't 16:9 or stretched.


Any suggestions?


Thanks.

tbrickey
 

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I bought a Hitachi 51" recently RP CRT. My wife likes to listen to MP3's via the DVD player. The way I have it set up, all audio is going out of the set to my Yamaha 5.1, which is located in our "wet bar". My wife will not let me put the Yamaha in "plain view" as it makes things look cluttered. My question is, while listening to mp3's (with menus off) and having the Panasonic blue "DVD" emblem on the screen cause burn in problems? It's the RP-62 and I do not believe there is a 'built in" screen saver. Any suggestions besides running a cable from the RP-62 through the wall, and under the floor to my Yamaha?
 
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