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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First let me say thanx to all of you that put RTV patch and all those instructions together; because of your work I'm enjoying the benefits.


Well Friday I found out CompUsa had the new 160GB Maxtor drive for sale with a 42bit addressing, ATA133 controller for $329 so Saturday I ran out and got it. Put it on my PC and ran Maxtor's quieting utility "acmset" on it, then ran Maxtor's format and burn in diags till Sunday. Pulled apart 3060 replay, copied partition 1, tie wrapped new drive into mount (left cover off the shake and bake mount), put it together and it's now working great.


Pause a live TV show shows 48 hrs 45 minutes 52 seconds time left; mute the TV and hear nothing (I'm lovin it - without the shake and bake it's quieter than the original drive in the shake and bake). I realize I bought a 160GB drive and the replay can only use 137GB but doing all of my recording at high I've been waiting for this drive since it was announced. Now if anyone wants to buy a 42bit ATA133 controller still sealed in its static bag for cheap let me know.


Thanx again.

Tommy
 

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Wow! I am inpressed.


I am just about to install a Maxtor 80 GB drive, once I find the misplaced location of the install procedure.


Enjoy!
 

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Once upon a time (ca 1974), I snagged a part time job at my college's computing center, doing some late-night maintenance. It was what we'd now call "defragging the hard drive," but back then, it involved backing up the system, reformatting the drives and restoring the backup tapes (because there was no defrag utility) which took hours. To be honest, the money was secondary, because what was really cool was to be able to spend time in the computer room unattended.


I remember opening these disk drives (about 4' high, 3' square) and yanking out a disk pack - a stack of 10 aluminum platters about a foot in diameter. The packs were moderately heavy - when I was down to 125 pounds, there were center of gravity problems leveraging something like that at arm's length. We'd store the disk drives in smoked plastic little cake boxes that screwed onto the disk pack (well, not really screwed on, but I'm not 'splaining right now).


Fifty megabytes. Seemed like an impossibly huge amount of storage at the time to be putting on something that took up about a cubic foot of space (not counting the drive, of course). This was the high density disk drive. The lower density drives used an identical looking disk pack, but "only" stored 25MB.


Of course, now: 50MB? Yeah, half a zippie. The older, low-density zip disks, that is.


I'm feeling REAL old right now.
 

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Of course, now: 50MB? Yeah, half a zippie.


How about a thumbnail. My smartmedia cards have more than that. And they transfer in SECONDS. WOW!


Toots, I had the same job but it was in 1987 on a DEC minivac. Backup with verify (twice to be safe), reformat, and restore, keeping last week's tapes and daily backups just in case.
 

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I got you guys beat. I started on an HP1000 computer in 1975. It had their first hard drive - 5Mb total - Fixed + removable platters. It cost $20,000.


That's nothing. The machine had 8k of memory. The memory cost $1 / byte. It was core-wound memory. Add another 8k - $8000.



Times have changed !!!


Greg
 

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Yah, my machine in '74 was much older tech. It was just high-end hardware, don'tcha know.


I mean, yeah, they were selling them little mini-5MB drives for a while, but these 25MB jobs were mainframe drives (and ultimately had been around longer).


And, btw - wasn't really core wound memory. Core planes had them little bitty ferrite rings (that were called "core") that were "woven" into a grid of wires. Normally, at least three wires: X and Y to address, and a third sense wire to read. One bit per core.


Although there were also some rather novel uses of core for read-only memory...
 

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OK, as long as we're into the nostalgia thing:


I started playing with computers in 1970 when I was a 9th grader at a private school. The school had splurged big time and had purchased a brand new state of the art DEC PDP-8. People were amazed -- 8K of 'core' memory. I forget how much was on the HD, but it must have been something like 32k or maybe 64k).


Anyway, the prmary interface was through a teletype (western union) that had a keyboard (you practically needed two fingers per key to push those keys in) and a paper tape reader to read ascii code punched through the paper (each row on the paper had 8 bits). The tape took forever to load, but again the school had splurged and purchased a high speed optical tape reader; you would feed fan-folded tape into the reader and it would fly through at maybe a few feet a second -- fast!


We also could input programs we wrote in machine language via 12 toggle switches on the front panel (which translates to 7777 octal), or we could input a program via the keyboard using assembly language and have a compliler do the translation for us.


As a result of memory constraints and speed issues, there was a huge premium on program efficiency -- programmers would compete on how short a program they could design to perform a given task. This is now a truly lost art.


For people who weren't as into it as I was (i.e., who had a life beyond computers), we ran a language called FOCAL (similar to Fortran), but of course my fellow geeks and I sneered at people who needed to resort to that crutch.


A lot has changed (but we all still sneer, don't we).
 

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I'll see your 1970 PDP-8 and raise you a 1969 CDC-6400.


I wrote a version of FOCAL for the Z-80 once, back in '76.


Beside the point:


I'm just still groaning at how big the hard disks have gotten. I mean, sheesh, when I bought a 4G drive back in '94, everyone thought I had an insanely huge hard drive. Shoot, so did I. Just couldn't imagine what you could do to fill that hard drive. 9G hard drives? Yeah, they were making them, but only companies with server farms could afford them.


Well, that was before I saw Windows-2000, Office-2000, Visual Studio 6 and digital cameras that are bigger than 640x480.


A year ago, I was freaking out over the fact that I could afford a 60G hard drive (or that they even existed in the first place) to stick in a VCR. The 80G drives were just coming out and...


Are we going to continue doubling storage space like this every year for the next decade? I shudder to think.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by toots
I'll see your 1970 PDP-8 and raise you a 1969 CDC-6400.


I wrote a version of FOCAL for the Z-80 once, back in '76...
OK, you win again. I actually loved FOCAL (but I would never admit it to others). By the way, do you remember the lunar landing programs we had back then (written in, of course, FOCAL)? Playing real time computer games with a teletype was a truly amazing experience.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by toots
I'll see your 1970 PDP-8 and raise you a 1969 CDC-6400.


I wrote a version of FOCAL for the Z-80 once, back in '76...
OK, you win again. I actually loved FOCAL (but I would never admit it to others). By the way, do you remember the lunar landing programs we had back then (written in, of course, FOCAL)? Playing real time computer games with a teletype was a truly amazing experience.
 

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“I wrote a version of FOCAL for the Z-80 once, back in '76... “


TRS-80 model I running TRS-DOS—my first computer--learned Z-80 assembly and we used to be able to do things with just that little bit of memory. BUT I learned to program using stacks of holarith cards.
 

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I started with Hollerith cards too and we had to punch each hole with a hand stylus. No keypunch machine in my high school then.


There are few things like getting 30 or 40 columns down a card and then punching a wrong hole. The delete key equivalent is a new card. Needless to say, you learned to be VERY careful.
 

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Ok, quick quiz:


How did mister Hollerith decide on the size of the punched card back in the late 1800s, and/or what other commonly found item of the time shared its size?
 

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I have no idea, but I'll make a wild guess: were the cards similar to employee time punch cards?
 

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Good guess, but the answer, as I always read it was:


Hollerith was looking for some size of card or slip of paper for which numerous dies, holders, frames and other appropriately sized thingies were available. The thinking being that if he picked a common enough size for the cards, it'd be easier to fabricate whatever it was that he had to fabricate, 'cause he could use more off-the self things.


So, the answer, which was true then, but no longer true now can be seen here
 
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