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Several years ago I acquired a slab of white marble, about 24 inches long, 16 inches wide and 8 inches thick. I'd like to slice it into smaller pieces to make into risers for my speakers. However I have no experience working with marble. Is there a way to saw it using a drysawing techinique? Or am I better off paying someone else to do it?
 

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If you want to cut it yourself, about the only way would be to rent a gas or electric powered chop saw with a diamond tip blade. Even then you'd have to cut from both sides to get through an 8" thick piece. If you're very careful and cut straight it should look okay. Depending on how many pieces you want to make, you can always just put the sawed part down.


DougK
 

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Well, not exactly a DIY project. Marble's pretty soft and you may have fissures that wil crack all over if stressed wrong.


I'm with George...call a marble granite or stone fabricator and have it done right.


Ted

Dixie Cut Stone and Marble LLC :)
 

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No chance to do a decent job cutting that slab yourself w/o the right tools and I doubt the right tools are available to you. No sleight on your abilities intended, just that you are talking specialized work. Even the diamond cutting balde could cause cracks.


As the others have said, take it to the pros and do it right. Besides you couldn't polish any of the cut edges yourself.


Doc
 

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Yeah, I would imagine you would need a very large wet diamond bladed saw and be able to polish that down to look nice. I wish I had something like that. It would be perfect for a pedistal mounted hunting trophy.


So, if he is using something like this as risers for his speakers (and assuming he has carpet), would he have to put spikes on the bottom and rubber feet on his speakers?
 

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The place to stop in and ask about pricing is easily spotted by all the tombstones planted in front of the store.


Unless you've got the "touch" that enables you to accomplish the remarkable with unfamiliar tools on possibly unstable material, as some people I know do, I would suggest tracking down a stone cutter.


"Yet even with a professional stone cutter - sometimes an arm falls off" - jdb
 
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