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Discussion Starter #1
What are your favorite methods for importing DVD-RAM to your computer?


The simplest one is to navigate to the DVD_RTAV folder on the DVD-RAM, provided your computer DVD drive can read DVD-RAM discs of course, and copy the .VRO file to your hard drive. Some people even suggest renaming the .VRO file to .MPG so it can be more readily played and opened by authoring programs.




But there are other ways which some people might prefer for the various advantages they present.


Using VOB2MPG doesn't work because DVD-RAM recorded in DVD-VR mode don't have .VOBs like DVD-Video discs do. Too bad because not only is VOB2MPG dead easy, but it has the advantage of producing a separate .MPG file for every title on a DVD, which can be convenient for authoring a new DVD composed of a variety of titles from one or more source discs. Another advantage of this is that most DVD authoring software allows for a return to the menu after each title, rather than just playing through one after another as you have no choice to if you have a succession of chapters instead. But VOB2MPG doesn't do .VRO files, so it doesn't work with DVD-RAM recorded as DVD-VR.


Another favorite is TMPGEnc DVD Author, which does recognize DVD-VR on a DVD-RAM and allows you to import and save it on your computer's HDD, in the folder of your choice.






One particularly interesting feature I've noticed about TDA is that when you import and save DVDs with chapters, it saves each chapter as an individual .MPG. This is great if as mentioned above, you would like to author a DVD, for example a concert or episode video, in which not only do you have a play all option, but you can choose one title (e.g. a song, piece, an episode, etc.) but then have the DVD automatically return to the menu after each one, rather than playing on and on like chapters do.


When it comes to preserving the 16:9 widesceen aspect ratio of such a video on DVD-RAM, however, I've noticed two different behaviors. If you go ahead and author a DVD right away with TDA, the widescreen aspect ratio is preserved in the resulting DVD.




If, however, you simply play the .MPG files TDA saves to your computer, they play with a vertically squished image. Same for playing just the .VOB files TDA creates when it makes a DVD. This occurs in WinDVD and VLC.




I've experienced this same behavior in Ulead DVD Movie Factory, Ulead DVD Workshop 2 (my favorite!), Ulead Video Studio and NeroVision. They can all import .VRO files from a DVD-VR on a DVD-RAM, but the file they save to the computer's HDD is vertically squished.


But what if you don't want to author a DVD right away? How can you import .MPG files you'd like to collect over time to eventually author a compilation DVD, but have these .MPG file retain the correct 16:9 aspect ratio? I've heard of people using IFO edit or VideoReDo, but I haven't tried those yet.


The only way I figured out to import .MPG files from a DVD-VR on a DVD-RAM and retain the correct 16:9 aspect ratio without re-encoding is with Womble Mpeg Video Wizard DVD. Here's how:


1. Import the .VRO file in the DVD_RTAV folder of your DVD-VR on DVD-RAM.


2. When you're ready to Export, click on the Monitor tab, then the Template button.




3. You won't be able to change any of the parameters, so click on Add New Template.




4. Name your new template "DVD NTSC widescreen" and select 16:9 for the PAR (Pixel Aspect Ratio) on the Expert tab.




5. Back on the Monitor tab, if you click on Detail, the blue bars (rather than red) confirm that your file is not being re-encoded.





6. Click Start and the resulting .MPG file saved to your computer's HDD is a widescreen .MPG, ready for authoring in your favorite authoring program when you're ready.

 

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Quote:
When it comes to preserving the 16:9 widesceen aspect ratio of such a video on DVD-RAM, however, I've noticed two different behaviors. If you go ahead and author a DVD right away with TDA, the widescreen aspect ratio is preserved in the resulting DVD.

If, however, you simply play the .MPG files TDA saves to your computer, they play with a vertically squished image. Same for playing just the .VOB files TDA creates when it makes a DVD. This occurs in WinDVD and VLC.

Hmmm. that doesn't happen for me. On the Clip Addition screen, under Clip Properties, the aspect ratio is posted-and can be changed, in the 'Clip Settings' box. When you move to the 'Cut Edit' tab, the video window of the imported clip can be adjusted to suit your preference. Right click on the video window, and select 'Display at Source size' and the content will be displayed that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great tip! I'll try it.


Edit:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westly-C /forum/post/14281057


Hmmm. that doesn't happen for me. On the Clip Addition screen, under Clip Properties, the aspect ratio is posted-and can be changed, in the 'Clip Settings' box. When you move to the 'Cut Edit' tab, the video window of the imported clip can be adjusted to suit your preference. Right click on the video window, and select 'Display at Source size' and the content will be displayed that way.

Hmmm, I'm just not seeing it. I do see the aspect ratio is posted as 16:9, but I don't see any way of changing it. Not that I'd want to, though, I think, because at this point it appears to be correct, right?




On the Cut Edit tab either, nothing happens when I right-click the video window. Again, however, it does at this point appear to have the proper 16:9 aspect ratio still.





What version of TDA are you using? Now, my TDA is pretty old, version 1.5.19.59, so that might be the difference.


If I continue the authoring process at this point, the resulting DVD does have the correct 16:9 aspect ratio, but what I'm interested in here is TDA's use as a tool for importing .MPGs for use for future authoring. And if I close TDA at this point, the files it has saved to my computer's HDD do not play widescreen; they're now vertically squished.
 

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The DVD drive in my PC can read RAM discs. I also played with the trial versions of Womble MPEG Video Wizard, VideoReDo TVSuite and TMPGEnc DVD Author 3.


I just copied the RAM’s VRO file to my hard drive and worked with it from there. I tried renaming it to MPG when playing around, but it not work with at least one of the above programs. I was told VRO is MPG but packaged differently (my words) & may or may not play properly. But there was really no reason to rename it.


After trying all 3 programs I went with VideoReDo. My main function was to edit out commercials from TV programs and they all worked. There are positive comments about all of these programs and a lot of the decision is personal preference about the look/feel or perhaps a specific function that one can do.


I don’t have any problem with 16:9 with VideoReDo, and I don’t recall any problem when using Womble either. I never saved anything with TMPGEnc so I can’t comment on it.


plplplpl - You mentioned your saved files were squished. What happens if you author/burn a DVD from these?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wait a minute, you're not thinking of TMPGEnc Xpress , are you, instead of TMPGEnc DVD Author (TDA) ?


Actually, I hadn't even thought about TMPGEnc Xpress because I don't want to (re)encode my files, but as an import tool, you've got a good point, if that's what you were referring to, because it does have a "Source Wizard" function that can be used to import from DVDs, including from DVD-VR on a DVD-RAM disc. It's similar to the same function in TDA, but in fact it has the features you were describing.







Unfortunately, however, when I tried using it for importing video from my DVD-RAM, then closing the program without continuing the encoding process of course, the .MPG files saved to my computer's HDD still play with the wrong 4:3 aspect ratio (vertically squished) in WinDVD, Ulead DVD Player, Nero Showtime (but correctly 16:9 in VLC, for some reason), and when I try to open up an authoring program like TDA, for example, and import those .MPGs, they are now displayed and described as 4:3.




Just spitballing here, but perhaps when you import from the DVD-RAM's DVD_RTAV folder, save the video as an .MPG on your computer's HDD and continue the process uninterrupted in TDA, it "remembers" the video's correct aspect ratio from the .IFO file in the DVD_RTAV source folder. But when you close TDA, then reopen it later and try to reimport the same video file from your computer's HDD all by itself, it's no longer flagged as 16:9.


The only way I've found so far to save a widescreen .MPG on your computer's HDD for later authoring is the method I described above with Womble. I've heard of people using IFOedit, which I haven't tried, but I'm assuming by its name it needs an IFO file to edit, so I don't know how it would work with a lone .MPG file. I've also heard of people using VideoReDo, but I'm unfamiliar with that program.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mike99,

As you can see in my last screenshot above, the saved files imported incorrectly as squished 4:3, and I did go ahead and try to author a DVD with it and it also was incorrectly squished 4:3.


I really ought to give VideoReDo a try. What are its features, its stengths and its weaknesses? A lot of people seem happy with it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/14282940




What version of TDA are you using? Now, my TDA is pretty old, version 1.5.19.59, so that might be the difference.

I have TMPGEnc DVD Author 3, so that explains the difference. I assumed from your screencaps, that was their latest version...

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45...essAddClip.jpg

In this shot, the aspect bar is highlighted. Can you click on it at this stage, and see if there are other options?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/14280221


When it comes to preserving the 16:9 widesceen aspect ratio of such a video on DVD-RAM, however, I've noticed two different behaviors. If you go ahead and author a DVD right away with TDA, the widescreen aspect ratio is preserved in the resulting DVD.


If, however, you simply play the .MPG files TDA saves to your computer, they play with a vertically squished image. Same for playing just the .VOB files TDA creates when it makes a DVD. This occurs in WinDVD and VLC.

Believe your problem is that the VRO (mpeg) file itself when recorded by your recorder was not properly “flagged” as widescreen. It was recorded correctly for widescreen anamorphic playback as you see with the squished image but when trying to play them back directly the player program does not know that they are widescreen anamorphic (squeezed) because the mpeg header is incorrect and the player program or DVD author program has no way of knowing or reading the possible correct aspect settings in the original information files from the DVD and cannot adjust the image correctly, in this case stretch out the squished image or play it with black bars at top and bottom for a none widescreen display. So essentially it is playing the image back correctly without the correct aspect header file information.


I have this problem also with recording widescreen digital channels on the Philips 3775/76 machines and have found a free program called DVDPatcher to correct this when saving the VRO/VOB mpeg files to the computer.


DVD Patcher will reset the header file information in an mpeg file so when it is played directly in a player program it displays correctly. It is a great and fast little utility. One may not need it if you have a full blown paid program that has a feature as this like the womble program, but it works great to correct the header information in mpeg files and would work perfectly in a situation where you just want the mpeg file saved for later playback or importation into an authoring program in the future.


Now this little program (DVD Patcher) can also be used to compress the file to a lower quality like to SVCD so in using it is important to make sure the various quality settings remain the same as the original recording except for the aspect ratio which you would change to 16:9 in this example so the program will not re encode the file, just change the aspect file header information. By the way it also works great in 64 bit Vista.

http://www.videohelp.com/tools/DVDPatcher
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westly-C /forum/post/14286724


I have TMPGEnc DVD Author 3, so that explains the difference. I assumed from your screencaps, that was their latest version...
Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/14288660


That screenshot is actually from TMPGEnc 3.0 XPress. Is that what TDA 3 looks like, too?

No, TDA 3 doesn't look like those caps. I thought the difference in appearance was due to your caps being from the latest version or a Vista version. I bought TDA3 last year, and there's a newer/updated version out this year.
 

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Discussion Starter #11

Quote:
Originally Posted by Westly-C /forum/post/14288815


No, TDA 3 doesn't look like those caps. I thought the difference in appearance was due to your caps being from the latest version or a Vista version. I bought TDA3 last year, and there's a newer/updated version out this year.


Ok, now I'm curious. Could you post a screenshot of what yours looks like?
 

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Discussion Starter #12

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falco63 /forum/post/14288665


Believe your problem is that the VRO (mpeg) file itself when recorded by your recorder was not properly flagged as widescreen. It was recorded correctly for widescreen anamorphic playback as you see with the squished image but when trying to play them back directly the player program does not know that they are widescreen anamorphic (squeezed) because the mpeg header is incorrect and the player program or DVD author program has no way of knowing or reading the possible correct aspect settings in the original information files from the DVD and cannot adjust the image correctly, in this case stretch out the squished image or play it with black bars at top and bottom for a none widescreen display. So essentially it is playing the image back correctly without the correct aspect header file information.


I have this problem also with recording widescreen digital channels on the Philips 3775/76 machines and have found a free program called DVDPatcher to correct this when saving the VRO/VOB mpeg files to the computer.


DVD Patcher will reset the header file information in an mpeg file so when it is played directly in a player program it displays correctly. It is a great and fast little utility. One may not need it if you have a full blown paid program that has a feature as this like the womble program, but it works great to correct the header information in mpeg files and would work perfectly in a situation where you just want the mpeg file saved for later playback or importation into an authoring program in the future.


Now this little program (DVD Patcher) can also be used to compress the file to a lower quality like to SVCD so in using it is important to make sure the various quality settings remain the same as the original recording except for the aspect ratio which you would change to 16:9 in this example so the program will not re encode the file, just change the aspect file header information. By the way it also works great in 64 bit Vista.

http://www.videohelp.com/tools/DVDPatcher

Woohoo, this works a treat! Great tip, and it's free and easy! You're right about verifying and adjusting all the settings so that they match, except for the aspect ratio which we want to change.


I'd just add to that to select Entire file rather than the default First header only under Patch. When I did the latter, WinDVD opened up widescreen but then snapped back right away and played the file 4:3 squished, but with Entire file selected, the whole video played back correctly as 16:9.




The only thing more one could wish for would be batch processing, but let's not look a gift horse in the mouth. Thanks, Falco63!
 

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I like how before it actually patches the file it shows the before and after settings info to double check you kept the settings the same, except what you want to change like its aspect.


I have only used the Entire File option myself since the first try with it and since it was so fast I just continued it that way, thought it would be better that way, now I know.


I was afraid it wouldn't work with Windows Vista 64 which I moved to when I recently bought a new computer but have found DVDPatcher to work with no problems with it.
 

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Here's what TDA 3 screens look like

Clip Addition, note Aspect ratio listed and vid box shape (for some reason, the actual image didn't show up after capping...


And the Cut Edit screen



Aspect ratio changed

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/14283519


Mike99,

As you can see in my last screenshot above, the saved files imported incorrectly as squished 4:3, and I did go ahead and try to author a DVD with it and it also was incorrectly squished 4:3.


I really ought to give VideoReDo a try. What are its features, its stengths and its weaknesses? A lot of people seem happy with it.


I probably should explain when I said I don't have any problems with 16:9 and VideoReDo TVSuite. The DVD-R discs that I burn with VideoReDo perform just like the DVD-R discs that I make with my stand alone DVD recorder. I have to use the TV's remote in order to set the display to the Full mode, otherwise the image is squished. I did not consider this a problem because I'm just used to changing the mode myself with DVD-R discs. IIRC, Womble performed the same.


DVD-RAM discs made on my stand alone DVD recorder automatically set the TV to Full mode. It would be nice to have DVD-R discs also do this, so I will investigate.


VideoReDo strengths: Displays a main video image which shows the current frame and also a timeline of thumbnail images. These are displayed on a sequential basis with no frame skipping. I could get TMPGEnc to only display the thumbnails for every 3rd or 4th frame.


I like the way VideoReDo displays the audio signal. Makes it easy if you want to make sure a cut does not include part of a leading or trailing sound.


VideoReDo has a typical Window's look with File, Edit, etc drop down menus. While this is not critical, for a beginner it makes it easier to find some commands.


VideoReDo TVSuite has it's own burning engine. Some people don't like Nero because it may recode the video. No problem with VideoReDo.


VideoReDo can combine the multiple VBO files found in a recording. You do not need DVD Decrypter or something similar.


VideoReDo TVSuite is an all-in-one program. You can import DVD-RAM or DVD-R files and burn a new DVD without using any other program.


VideoReDo TVSuite was also the least expensive of the 3 programs.


I don't know of any weaknesses yet because I'm still pretty new with using it.


I know Womble can create many different fades or disolves, but I was not interested in that. And I did not think the user interface was as user friendly as VideoReDo. Depending where I read, TMPGEnc DVD Author 3 either recodes everything or it does not. But the company states you need an Internet connection because they periodically will check your PC for verification. From what I've read, some people don't like that & will not buy their product.


All these products have a free trial period & I suggest you give them all a workout to see what works for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just took VideoReDo out for a spin. It's a nice piece of kit. Its interface is more intuitive and straightforward than Womble, I'd say. Although it lacks some of the editing bells and whistles Womble has, for plain vanilla cut editing it's quicker and easier. It also has an Ad-Detective feature designed to scan for and eliminate commercials automatically, which sounds pretty cool, although I haven't tried it since I've usually completed that step if necessary on the DVD recorder. There's also a Quicksteam Fix tool, which can be of use if you have a funky, out-of-sync, out-of-spec or corrupted input file.


A simple Save As (.MPG) of your imported widescreen .VRO, however, will again result in a video that plays 4:3 squished. This can easily be remedied, however, by clicking the Options button on the Save As dialog box, and in the ensuing box selecting 16:9 from the dropdown Aspect Ratio menu in Video Properties. The resulting saved .MPG now plays correctly as 16:9. I suppose this is similar to the process I described above for Womble, the main differences being that in VideoRedo it's a bit easier and in Womble you can clearly check in the Details tab with the blue versus red bars that your video is not being re-encoded, although by the speed VideoReDo processes your file I'm quite sure there's no re-encoding going on here either for simply changing the aspect ratio. What I'm beginning to assume that is going on here as well as in Womble is that as in DVD Patcher, the .MPG file's header is simply being patched to 16:9.




One significant difference I've noticed between TMPGEnc DVD Author and VideoReDo is that for people going on to make a DVD right away in one sitting, TDA seems to read and "remember" the imported .VRO's proper 16:9 aspect ratio, again I'm beginning to assume from the source DVD_RTAV folder's .IFO file, so it goes ahead and by default authors a correct 16:9 DVD automatically, but if you try to do the same thing with the default settings in VideoReDo, it produces an incorrect 4:3 squished DVD.


This can be corrected manually quite easily, however, by clicking the Change Output Options button and under the Video Options tab changing the Aspect Ratio to 16:9. The resulting DVD will now play correctly as 16:9.


1.



2.



3.




All in all, VideoReDo works quite well, has clear and useful options and is pretty intuitive. It's a good tool.
 

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plplplpl,


I also dug into things a bit deeper right after I posted my last message and found the same settings that you did. You can also change the Display properties in order to show 16:9 on your PC while editing. I was going to try burning another DVD to see what happens, but I just posted a message on VideoReDo's forum asking if this change will cause recoding. Somehow I'm the impression it will not, but I want to make sure. I'll let you know what they say. FWIW, I have always received a response on their forum. I think most or all the time I'm left with the impression it is from someone at VideoReDo. And of course others have also replied. But it's nice knowing that the "factory" is involved, or so it seems.


But I wonder why the Output Options come as 4:3 if set for "No Change".


To get rid of that yellow dot that indicates "Minor Recode", VidepReDo said to check the box that says Accept non-compliant DVD settings. Also do NOT include closed captions.


I also saw a comment that indicated VideoReDo Plus had more or different features than the TVSuite version. The TVSuite was basically made for editing TV programs. So you may want to try the Plus version and see if it does more for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #18

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike99 /forum/post/14299739


But I wonder why the Output Options come as 4:3 if set for "No Change".

My only guess at this point is above, that TDA seems to reference the aspect ratio flag in the IFO file of the source DVD_RTAV folder of the DVD-VR whence the VRO comes if the import and DVD authoring is done in one uninterrupted session, whereas VideoReDo does not and you have to specify the aspect ratio manually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike99 /forum/post/14299739


To get rid of that yellow dot that indicates "Minor Recode", VidepReDo said to check the box that says Accept non-compliant DVD settings. Also do NOT include closed captions.

If you're referring to my screeenshot above, I think that's a different matter, unrelated to aspect ratio. The aspect ratio actually has a green check mark next to it, which indicates that even manually changing that parameter will not cause a re-encode. The yellow dot is next to the Maximum GOP (Group of Pictures) property, and my guess is that my DVD recorder encodes with a GOP length which is a little longer than usual, which off the top of my head I'd say is normally about 15 for 29.97 fps (frames per second) NTSC, i.e. one I-frame every half a second. I don't think it's a big deal if it's 18, though, and the speed with which VideoReDo processed the authoring leads me to believe that the video isn't being re-encoded in any substantial way.


It's great that you asked some of those questions in the VideoReDo forum, as you say, and I look forward to the responses you get.



Westly-C,

Thanks for the screenshots! From the snazzy interface, it does looks closer in function to my sceenshots above of TMPGEnc 3.0 XPress, but mostly it serves as a reminder that I'm still using an antediluvian version of TDA. I'm wondering if it's worth the upgrade, though, since I rarely use it except for a few quick and dirty authoring jobs, since TDA has limited customization compared to my favorite, Ulead DVD Workshop 2, which despite its age is really flexible.


I mainly like TDA for its import function which saves chapters as individual .MPGs. This is great, as I mentioned, for concert or episode DVDs beacause you can author a DVD in which these chapters can be made into titles. The difference between a title and a chapter on a DVD is that after a title, you can author it to keep playing the next title or you can have it go back to a menu after each one, but with chapters, you have no choice: it can't go back to a menu after each one; they just keep playing one after the other.


Does the new version of TDA save the 16:9 files it imports from widescreen discs as widescreen .MPGs? I would suspect not, but even if it did, I'm not sure it would be worth the upgrade if, as I'm now learning, I can patch the saved files as 16:9 quite easily with DVD Patcher, Womble or VideoReDo.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/14300103


I mainly like TDA for its import function which saves chapters as individual .MPGs. This is great, as I mentioned, for concert or episode DVDs beacause you can author a DVD in which these chapters can be made into titles.

There is a saying: One man's pain is another man's pleasure.

I have also used TDA for years. While you find it useful that TDA splits a title into separte MPG files at chapter points, I now find it a royal pain. I recently bought a portable media player (Creative Zen, love it). I use TDA to import my DVDR recorded programs from RAM (.VRO) to my PC (.MPG) and then use a utility to transcode the .MPG into DivX/AVI for the player. When TDA splits the .VRO into Multiple .MPGs I end up with multiple .AVIs which I have to play separately on the ZEN.


Have you found a simple free tool to join multiple .MPG files the way VOB2MPG will join multiple .VOBs of a fileset into a single .MPG?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
My first thought was that the easiest way of doing what you want is simply to import your .VRO and save it as an .MPG with Womble or VideoReDo, as described above. But you want something free.



I gave it a bit of thought, and the way I've usually done quick and easy merges of .MPGs is with TMPGEnc, either the free version or the Plus version, in (after you cancel the Wizard) File->MPEG Tools under the Merge & Cut tab. The former has a free trial of 30 days for MPEG 2 files and thereafter only handles MPEG 1. The Plus version handles MPEG 2 files but it is not free. TMPGEnc 3.0 XPress only has mutliplex and demultiplex in its MPEG Tools, no Merge & Cut.




However, neither the free version nor the Plus version handles the .AC3 audio our DVD recorders usually produce, so there's no sound unless you're willing to extract the audio in VirtualDubMod, for example, to an uncompressed .WAV file, then re-encode it to an MPEG-1 Audio Layer II elementary stream .M2A file, then re-multiplex it with your elementary stream video file. It may all be free, but I think we're getting away from easy.



Another option worth investigating is AviDemux , which despite its name can be used to open .MPG and even .VRO files if they have been copied over to your computer's HDD beforehand. It will ask you if you want it to index the file, so say yes and it'll import it. Then you can save as an .MPG, or in the Auto menu, there's an option for saving directly as an iPod-ready .MP4. It's a free program.



But for free and easy, nothing beats VOB2MPG. Problem is, it doesn't open .VROs.


So I got to thinking, you can sometimes "fool" some programs that open .MPGs but not .VROs simply by renaming the .VRO to .MPG. Could we do something along the same lines for VOB2MPG? To begin with, I copied the DVD_RTAV folder from the DVD-RAM onto my computer's HDD because you can't rename a file while it's on the disc. First, I tried renaming the VR_MOVIE.VRO file to VR_MOVIE.VOB. It didn't work; VOB2MPG would have none of it. Then I thought about what VOB2MPG might expect to see in a regular VIDEO_TS folder from a standard DVD. So I tried renaming the VR_MANAGR.IFO file to VIDEO_TS.IFO, and the VR_MOVIE.VRO file to VIDEO_TS.VOB. Still no dice.


Finally, I tried renaming the VR_MANAGR.IFO file to VTS_01_1.IFO and the VR_MOVIE.VRO file to VTS_01_1.VOB (I didn't bother with the .BUP file, as that is normally just a BackUP file of the .IFO), and lo and behold, VOB2MPG ate it up and spit out one big .MPG file.



So to recap, here's what to do:


1. Copy the DVD_RTAV folder from the DVD-RAM onto your computer's HDD.


2. Rename the VR_MANAGR.IFO file to VTS_01_1.IFO and the VR_MOVIE.VRO file to VTS_01_1.VOB.


3. Run it through VOB2MPG.



There you go, simple and free.
 
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