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Michael Dell is interviewed in PC Magazine today. I found this quote interesting.


"What's really happening is kind of interesting. We're starting to see, kind of for the first time, the introduction of Moore's Law into high-resolution digital displays. And it's a phenomena that hasn't happened to this point. So you've got basically a silicon-based technology, with companies like TI and Intel. And it's sort of right up our power alley in terms of cost curves, performance, more performance for lower cost, supply chain, and where these things will be. I mean, they'll be in conference rooms, in small businesses, medium businesses. We already deal in projectors, these DLP projectors. We've got a monster DLP projector business that's going very fast. So as the cost curve comes down, as you get incredible performance, you put these things in your home—all of a sudden you've got this massive display. You see advanced resolutions. [People think],"Wow, this is pretty cool." You can do a lot of things with that. Hook up your computer to it, hook up television signals. So that's exciting."


The rest of the interview:




Scot Olson
 

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Good quote.


Moore's Law (or theory) can not flourish in HT world run by boutique HT stores where a good display runs $12K+


Ironically, I think it is going to be rear projection world, where things are starting to really heat up, that will pull the front projection world along. If nothing else, people do know pixel count. In the coming year it is going to be increasingly difficult to sell someone a 720p $10K progressive display when they can get a 1080p rear projection display for significantly less.


LCD's in front projection world are also going to crack the whip on the LCoS and DLP folks. The continuously over-achieving LCD isn't even what Mr. Dell is talking about.


Whether it is Dell, Apple or whomever, it is the changing of "the channel" of current HT equipment distribution that will enable Moore's Law to be applicable to projectors. If you can wire your surround sound, you can wire up a projector, and people are going to start figuring that out and not want to spend $10K+ on a display.


-Mr. Wigggles
 

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stacey,


That wasn't my point. Dell was referring to LCoS and DLP as being the manifestation of Moore's Law in digital displays.


The funny thing is I think LCD through good old fashion competition have pushed DLP and LCoS along faster then any typical Moore's Law scalability/miniaturization advance.


Moore's Law helps in normal silicon because as you shrink the die, the power consumptions goes down and the speed goes up in the processor. With digital imagers shrinking doesn't really help as much. Shrinking the imager just makes it harder to focus light on it while the increased concentration can cause thermal problems. So while higher pixel count is an advantage, smaller imager size isn't.


The name of the game is yield. I really wish Intel had gotten involved say 3 years ago when LCoS (other than D-ila) was starting to take off. They might well be the best people to mass market LCoS but they are so late to the party (at CES I couldn't get one once of info about LCoS from anyone at the Intel booth other than "oh yeah, we're getting into that field")


-Mr. Wigggles
 
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