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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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I think cburbs meant, "Look at the top of "Screens", where the thread link below will take you.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=359152



Mississippi Mud


All paints are "Flat Intereior Acrylic Latex"


1 quart Behr Deep Base (1300)

1 quart Behr Ultra Pure White "Ceiling"

2 quarts Behr White Opal Perlescence (On the "Faux Paint" shelf)

1 1/96 oz droplet of Red Oxide.


You can use this mix as a 'stand alone' for DLPs, or with Silver Metallic underneath for LCDs with lower lumen & contrast ratio specs.


...and of course, for the Top Coat on all mirror applications, Glass or Plexi
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally posted by jcmccorm
Thanks MissMan! Can I assume that the topcoat with an appropriate base would be fine for CRT???


Cary
Yep, but you probably could omit the Red Oxide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks. =) I'd actually requested this before you got your thread up, so I guess it became redundant pretty quickly. I appreciate the response though.


~chad
 

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Hey Scott, I've got some Goo Basecoat left over that I'll probably use. I rolled on 2 coats of base and 2 coats of topcoat of Ken's Goo product. I didn't like the texture so I sanded it down and rolled it again. It's better, but still too much texture for me. I broke down and bought a compressor and HVLP spray gun and want to give it another shot but I'm about out of Goo topcoat. Now I'm trying to decide if I want to pony up for another liter of it or try something else. Anyone do any comparisons?


If I wasn't going to use the Goo basecoat, I'd just use white primer. Kilz makes some that I've used before and it's available at Home Depot.


Cary
 

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I thought about starting a new thread on this, but figured this one would work fine.


My question for MississippiMan is, what is the origin of Mississippi Mud (MM)?


I've seen it compared to Goo, so I've always assumed it was created as a lower cost alternative. If this is so, how were the particular ingredients selected and the proportions determined? Is there a thread somewhere that chronicles it's development?


Other people have suggested using the opalescent Behr paint for other uses, so I'm also wondering if MM is from a different screen project.


Mississippi Man, enlighten us, please.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally posted by Omzig
I thought about starting a new thread on this, but figured this one would work fine.


My question for MississippiMan is, what is the origin of Mississippi Mud (MM)?


I've seen it compared to Goo, so I've always assumed it was created as a lower cost alternative. If this is so, how were the particular ingredients selected and the proportions determined? Is there a thread somewhere that chronicles it's development?


Other people have suggested using the opalescent Behr paint for other uses, so I'm also wondering if MM is from a different screen project.


Mississippi Man, enlighten us, please.
Omzig,


so ya want a biography 'eh?


Ok.


After last year's Canuk Shootout, and seeing what Goo could do with a wall, board, or BO cloth screen, I started using it for X1 installations. Did at least 5 in quick succession, and I can vouch for it's effectiveness. But it quickly lost favor (...to me, mind you.)not because of any failure related to the mix. Rather, because I make screens that are as large as possible (9' diagonal is usually the smallest I go.) both the cost for what I received to work with, and sometimes immediate availability, caused me to look elsewhere. Having been 'something' of an Graphic & Avant Guarde Artist, and having specialized in mixing pigments to create unique hues for cosmically significant Posters in the early 70's, it was no stretch just to look at Goo and guess close enough to "roughly" duplicate the mix. I too, also read of experiments other tried with Pearlescence, but none seem ready to tout their experience as a success story. I decided the key was combining the attributes of Pearlescence with the basic color uniformity values that a Flat White provides.


Seemed to work just as good as "you know what."


Put some of the last Goo I possessed on top of CMRA's ME early last November after having lightened that wonder paint by 1/2 by adding 1 additional quart of UPW-Flat. I noticed that my overall results went through the roof, comparatively speaking, when compared to using just the Goo, or ME Lite by themselves. Hmmmmmmm.............!


So I dredged up old posts by Tryg & others that discussed the use of silver. Once again, the results posted showed vague potential, but nothing to set the AVS world on it's collective ear. But the value of the contrast enhancing aspect of the silver , (....it is actually a funny shade of "black" you know?) wasn't lost on me, and the recent experience on Vancouver Island with MM (...still wasn't called that just yet...)over the ME Lite had me anxious to try something different.


Hence, Silver Metallic / MississippiMud was born, 'er created, well....say, "thrown up"? ;)


The screen shots I posted showed a considerable improvement. enough so to start an all out (...but congenial.) showdown between myself and CMRA. But my Smooth a wall, paint, wet sand, paint, wet sand, etc. procedure caused CMRA to suggest that Plexiglas might allow for a smoother application for the "skill challenged' cretins that often aspire to make a screen.:p


Little did we either of us guess what lay in store when I showed up in San Diego and collaborated on the very first SM/MM Plexi Screen.


In short..., we were floored. "Almost" speechless. And most definitely excited. When your used to one particular standard, and have seen many others as well, and something YOU create seems to go far beyond those norms; well you should be able to understand how we both felt and reacted at 4;30 AM that day.



We sat down and watched "Pirates of The Caribbean ", of course. Before breakfast.


So there it is. No embellishment, just the facts, thank you very much.


Stay tuned to this channel for late breaking developments.


There is Gold in dem der hills..., and perhaps a Screen or two as well!
 

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Thanks MM.


I don't know about others here at this forum, but your work with CMRA seemed to come out of left field with all the right answers. It just felt too good to be true and we know how people react when that happens.


Your explanation fills in the gaps from the beginning of the story and now it all makes sense. Kinda like watching the first LOTR movie after seeing the second two.


That's what is so great about these forums. We all get together and share our stories and experiments. We feed off the creative juices of everyone involved in the process and can create something bigger than ourselves.


Thanks to you and CMRA, we may have finally created a platinum screen for an iron price.
 

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Yes, thanks MississippiMan! Interesting read.


One question about the new SM/MM/Plexi design. Dammit Jim, I'm a CRT man! Can you use the SM backing with a CRT? Is the resulting screen white or grey?


Cary
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally posted by jcmccorm
Yes, thanks MississippiMan! Interesting read.


One question about the new SM/MM/Plexi design. Dammit Jim, I'm a CRT man! Can you use the SM backing with a CRT? Is the resulting screen white or grey?


Cary
Cary,


First off, the apperance of the screen surface is only 'very slightly' off white when MM is applied correctly over Silver Metallic. Getting the right amount over the SM is tied to you putting on just enough that the screen has no "apparent" grey hue. It just looks flat, dull white.


SM/MM is trying to do a good job at something SD/MM does even better. Both incorporate a screen design that can enhance contrast in PJs with lower values, yet due to the white/translucent Top Coat, it offers everything a CRT could want.


I have used SM/MM extensively, unlike SD/MM. I've admittedly never used a CRT PJ, but the principle that causes the "enhanced" screen surface brightness to provide a brilliant image, does NOT interfere with the contrast enhancement, nor does the latter create a darker screen, obviously.


I'd feel safe recommending either for a CRT, with the nod for the acquisition of something spectacular going to SM/MM Light Fusion. Although it's NOT the same thing, any $5-9K DLP with a minimum 1200 lumens and a contrast ratio of 1600:1 or better is gonna compare favorably to a 250 lumen CRT in most departments, WITHOUT any extra help in the Contrast Dept. from a "Grey" screen.


MM Mix is applied to a thickness that both allows the light we want to pass through, the longest wavelengths, and react to the Silver/Black effect of the Mirror, and to about 30% less effect, the Silver Metallic. The rest of the higher light waves, though the brightest, still have less penetrating power due to their propensity to reflect back off a favorable surface.


Hey, light from one source is essentially split in to two different sources, then the 'weaker' (in terms of reflectivity) is recombined with the "stronger" light ( *Light Fusion*...don't cha know...) at the screen's surface.


A CRT will benefit from a any screen that can capture the detail, color, and contrast the PJ puts out, efficiently utilizing all aspects of the light, attenuating virtually none, yet enhancing where needed.


I say, go for it. Especially if your considering SM/MM on a wall or board. That's an application that while not optimal, still delivers real world results that IMO exceed screens of, say...., much higher expense.


Here's a shot. Silver metallic over ME as a primer, three "Rolled" coats of MM Mix. 119" Z2


Hizzzoner
 
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