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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering purchasing a Mitsubishi RPTV.


Can anyone offer me insight into their experiences, good and bad, with these sets? Which one did you buy, why? Why or Why not did you get the built in HDTV decoder. Did oyu get platinnum, or diamond, and why?


Any thoughts on your overall experience would be helpful as well.
 

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Hi Imageman -


I've had my Mits 65809 since December 4, '01 and have so far been very pleased. I'm running a Mits 8020 DVD player, SA3100HD cable box from Time Warner, a PS2 and a Mits U-757(I think) S-VHS VCR and I'm pleased with almost everything I've seen on it.


I guess I should note, because of space constraints in the approach into my basement (where my multipurpose HT is) I HAD to go with the 65" Mits because it can break down into two pieces. Why nobody else is doing this yet is beyond me.


I picked the Platinum over the Platinum Plus - to me, the difference in image quality in side-by-side comparisons was negligible. I figured that once I got home, I REALLY wouldn't be able to tell the difference. (I honestly haven't even thought about having made that choice until you mentioned it in your post) The bigger speakers in the Plus unit aren't of any benefit to me - I do however run a Nintendo 64 occasionally through my front inputs and turn the speakers on for that - and honestly, it doesn't sound half as bad as I had first anticipated.


The only tweaking I've done so far on my set is the basic video adjustments as guided through by the Avia set up DVD. My dealer also set up my 64 point calibration for me and set it to factory default. So if anything seems out of whack from moving it or whatever, I just reset it and it looks fine. Although I've only had to do this once.


Had money not been an option, I would have been all over a Diamond model. But I wouldn't have gone with an internal HD decoder, simply because I figured that when HD was available in our area, I'd need an HD cable box to get it anyways. (I'm one for messing with antennas on my house for OTA reception)


I do plan on having my set ISF'd - hopefully soon as there's an ISF'er coming through my area in late July - but that will be subject to WAF for budgetary reasons.


Any other questions, let me know.
 

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I purchased a 55819 in January of this year. I got a good package deal w/the Mits HD500 STB and Directv oval dish - didn't buy the integrated set because I wanted Directv. The Diamond was out of my price range.


My overall experience has been excellent. I thoroughly demoed the set prior to purchase, viewing OTA and Sat HD, SD and 480i DVD.


I did the manual and electrostatic focus, and added attenuators for the component feeds (gets rid of the "red push").


DVD progressive scan and HD content look fabulous. Regular 480i stuff looks good to fairly lousy, depending on the station. In my area, 480i cable has better PQ than sat.


I installed a uhf/vhf antenna in my attic and can get OTA digital PBS, CBS, ABC, NBC, FOX and PAX. Directv gives me HBOHD, SHOWHD, and HDNET.


My only regret is that I didn't go for the 65"!
 

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We bought a WS-55807 display a year ago March from Sears (internet price matching). Platinum series. No other dealer in area (required for after sale support issues here in boondocks) so did not consider Plat+ or Diamond. Decoder was not an option then; probably would get consider an integrated set if was buying today. Hoping to buy the "Promise Module" when the time comes.


Mits was bit rough out of the box as expected and it had some HD geometry errors ("speed bumps") and some red push. (note: the Spot is a great place for Mits Tips and Tweaks). After I reduced the contrast and brightness levels, went through the convergence process and then I tweaked it using Ovation's AVIA disk. Then about six months later I had it ISF'd ... red push is gone, geometry is fixed and the gray scale was tweaked too. In 16 months set has worked fine. Love the HD (limited now to HBO, SHO, and PBS). DVDs are great (using a Panasonic RP-56 progressive player) and SD is okay to fine over Time Warner using SA2000HD. I understand that the newer Mits are leaving the factory in better shape now though an ISF is always desirable no matter the brand.


Recommend Mits? Yes.

Bruce
 

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IMO. the Mits is the best user and tech tweakable set on the market. So, while it may not have the best picture out of the box. In its price range, it has the potential to have the best picture (with some professional calibration or DIY magic).
 

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I've been considering a Mits myself. I have cable television right now but plan on getting a dish eventually. Do I need to purchase a HD receiver at the time I purchase a HD ready Mits.
 

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If you get a Mits, they are very nice out of the box, however, if you set aside some of your budget ($400-$800) to have it FULLY tweaked it will REALLY shine, when tweaked (with greyscale, I2c, geometry, etc...) they are probably the better if not the best consumer rptvs on the market today.
 

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I have a recomendations for you to check on a Mits before you buy.


Make sure that the powersupply can provide enough power. The deflection

circuitry draws power from the same source as the tubes. When you display a largely white image the guns can tap out a powersupply, robbing the deflection circuit of power needed to maintain geometry.


You can test this by displaying a test image on the screen used for setting Contrast levels. These images can be found on the Avia DVD & on various other generic DVD cleaning / calibration discs.


If you get distortion or the pin-cushion image then look at a different model.

I know this was a problem for some older Mits and may have been fixed. But better to check it before you buy. Just have the clerk feed a DVD into it and display the Contrast Calibration Image. You will know right away without any messing around.


And something else to consider. Mits uses Electrostatic focus controls as opposed to Servo controlled focus.


It is way to involved to explain here, but there is plenty of info on the net about it.


And I believe the Mits only allow a global Convergence setting for 4:3 & 16:9. Where as other manufacturers allow setting Convergence for each mode.


these are just some things to look for / into.


good luck.


eric.
 

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Let me try and clear some things up. It seems that the above poster has had a past experience with a Mits set. They obviously have no experience with the 16:9 HD Mits sets. Let me try and clear up some comments which can be very misleading.

Quote:
Make sure that the powersupply can provide enough power. The deflection

circuitry draws power from the same source as the tubes. When you display a largely white image the guns can tap out a powersupply, robbing the deflection circuit of power needed to maintain geometry.


You can test this by displaying a test image on the screen used for setting Contrast levels. These images can be found on the Avia DVD & on various other generic DVD cleaning / calibration discs.


If you get distortion or the pin-cushion image then look at a different model.

I know this was a problem for some older Mits and may have been fixed. But better to check it before you buy. Just have the clerk feed a DVD into it and display the Contrast Calibration Image. You will know right away without any messing around.
Not a problem in the current sets. Even at contrast = 100% (not that I recommend watching any set in this torch mode)

Quote:
And something else to consider. Mits uses Electrostatic focus controls as opposed to Servo controlled focus.


It is way to involved to explain here, but there is plenty of info on the net about it.
Mits and every other rear-projection HD set I know of has both a manual (Servo) and electrostatic focus.

Quote:
And I believe the Mits only allow a global Convergence setting for 4:3 & 16:9. Where as other manufacturers allow setting Convergence for each mode.
On a 16:9 set...there is no seperate convergence for 4:3 images. On the Mits, there are two convergence modes. 480i/480p and 1080i. Mits is as or more flexible than other sets. Many others like Toshiba and Hitachi only have a single convergence mode (540p/1080i), a cost saving measure not to support 480p natively.
 

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I was all set to buy a Mitsubishi 46 inch 16:9 set, but now I am a little nervouse about the need to fine tune. How important and how difficult is it to fine tune your picture. What are the odds that it will be delivered to my house and in need of a lot of adjustment to make it watchable.


Are their any retailers who offer fine-tuning as part of the delivery service? It seems to me if you are paying close to $2000 or more for a TV, you would be able to expect it to perform optimally without greater expense.


Am I naive?


Also, can you provide a link to more details on Sears Internet Pice Matching? What's the best price you all have seen on a 46" 16:9 HDTV unit?
 

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Mits is a good choice. All brands have issues; some more than others. Mits are coming out of the factory better now supposedly than last year. See www.***************.com for more than you even wanted to know about a Mits (plus a whole lot of brands). Mits are very tweakable by the user (see the Spot for details). (The Spot started off as a Mits enthisiasts place; has expanded to other brands).


You should start off with using something like Ovation's AVIA to help setup the display at first. It would be worth it someday to get an ISF calibration but not mandatory (good recommendation no matter the brand actually). The new ones do have a bit more Red Push than some others (can be attenuated by a dooda for HD or DVD or fixed by a calibrator). I bought via Sears Internet price matching a year ago; they have changed somewhat; I suspect you can get updated experience over at the Spot. (Don't know if Sears carries the 46" size; used to be they did not (I have a 55807, a 2001 model).


Holler is you have some more questions.

Bruce
 

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I feel the need to demystify the setup process for a decent out-of-the-box experience...


When it gets to your home, the set will look "good". Some sources will look better than others, but that's life. It will be the case with any set you choose, by any manufacturer out there. Also something to keep in mind, make sure your cable signal is split the fewest number of times possible before it hits your big screen.


The Avia "set-up disc" (Video Essentials is another one) will help you with setting your brighness, color, contrast, etc. to proper levels using broadcast/professional test patterns. This process will help to make your TV look "better". Avia also gives you audio set-up programs as well for calibrating your audio system should you have a SPL (decible) meter..


An ISF calibration will make your TV look "best". This is an optional procedure that probably only 5% of RPTV owners have done - although most likely all would benefit. This will take care of things the casual users wouldn't/couldn't/shouldn't take care of themselves. From what I've seen, ISFing shouldn't be done until the set is well broken in.


Cable signals will look "good", DVD's will look "better", HDTV will look best.


I hope this eases your mind some.
 

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Squid.......your signature is a riot!
 

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Thanks for all the quick responses. I do feel better about getting the RPTV now. Several retailers, I am leaning toward The Big Screen Store in Northern Virginia (they sell Mistubishi's exclusively), offer "professional set-up" and delivery as part of the package. Should I expect ISFing or just some basic calibration?
 

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Basic meaning via the normal user controls though perhaps with a quality touch. One normally does an ISF after there are about 100hours on a set. This allows things to kinda settle in and it is the initial period when early deaths occur. Be a pain to spend hundreds on a ISF and see it go poof cause the set had to be repaired. -- Bruce
 

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The shop I bought my Mits 65809 from also did a "professional setup" - which in their case was a full 64 point calibration, and then set that calibrated setting to the factory default.


It didn't include any adjustments on the video settings. Maybe see if they'll toss in a copy of Avia for you if you do that stuff yourself - then you've got it for when you need it. I think I paid about $60 for my copy at Media Play.
 

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Mits (...and Toshiba) is good out of box and can be tweaked to give you an awesome picture for the price of the set. If you want the best picture possible but don't want to have to tweak yourself or pay for a calibration...I say get a Pioneer (you'll just have to pay more).
 

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Be sure to buy a newer set, the ones with the built in HDTV decoder. You are not buyig the set for the decoder though, as they have used newer components and have beter stuff inside. so BEWARE. The newer sets have a sharper picture (.52 Lenticular pitch) and have an easy correction for the dreaded RED PUSH issue. You will do justice to yourself if you do.


I just bought a WS55819, and after scaning through the SPOT, have realized that I should have bought a WS55859. DON"T MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE AS ME. (I can't type properly on this keyboard, but email me and I will explain it properly to you). TRUST ME, there is a difference, do your research. THE NEWER ones are brighter, and better calibrated. Why buy a TV, and then pay some guy $600+ to come to your home and calibrate it (and possibly void the warranty in the process). There is a difference, but you won't be able to tell in the store. Just email me and I will explain!

[email protected]
 

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I wound up buying the WT-46809 from the big screen store. I was told they don't yet make a 46" with an internal HDTV receiver.


It was delivered on Saturday morning.


I love it! The delivery guys were pretty clueless, but did some tuning of the 64 points of convergence. I kicked him out though, and did the most of it myself. To be honest, it wasn't all that bad. Fixing the big plus took care of most of the red push, all I had to fine tune were the spots around the edges and in the corners.


My DirecTivo look really good, especially on Expand mode (as opposed to stretch). The DVD looks phenomenal! It's hard to imagine a much better picture. Eventually I will get and HDTV set-top box and see just how great it can be.


I notice some programs on the DirecTivo are much higher quality than others. HBO movies, for instance, look much much better than local network programs. I suspect that has to do with the source quality and whether they are sending amorphic vs. anamorphic images.


Bottom line is, I am very, very pleased with the quality of the picture after less than an hour's worth of adjustment out of the box. Maybe I am easy to please.
 
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