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I've made some MKVs with Makemkv and I like how they turn out. However since I'm low on harddrive space I was wondering what is an easy way to compress the video and leave the HD audio alone. I was told BD Rebuilder could do this but it turns out it can't if the filesize is less than a BD9.


I'm looking to convert some of the files to around to around 4-10 Gigs with lossless audio intact.


Is this possible?
 

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i would imagine you could:


1) split (demux) the mkv file, saving separate audio and video tracks. i think mkv merge has an option to do this. maybe tsmuxer?


2) compress the split video track using handbrake


3) put the newly compressed video track and the audio track together with a program like mkv merge.
 

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BluRip (all-in-one solution). Or MakeMKV -> RipBot (encode video) -> mkvmerge (add the original MKV file created by MakeMKV and the MKV created by RipBot, then merge the encoded video stream and the HD audio stream).


You don't have to split video and audio before encoding; just add the file created with MakeMKV in RipBot and encode video; HD audio (and PGS subtitles) will be lost, so restore it by adding the original MKV file and the encoded MKV file in mkvmerge, selecting the correct video and audio (and subtitle) streams, then merging them. BluRip is a single step solution (AnyDVD HD is required).
 

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I'd get another 2tb for $60 on sale before compressing anything. If I want compressed video I'll watch u-verse or worse yet netflix.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 /forum/post/20779660


I'd get another 2tb for $60 on sale before compressing anything. If I want compressed video I'll watch u-verse or worse yet netflix.

Agreed. 2TB drives are so cheap now that the $60 is worth it to me. My time is pretty valuable nowadays to mess with shrinking for hours on end for each movie.
 

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The HD audio tracks themselves are quite large which doesn't leave much for the video if you're trying to squeeze both onto a DL dvd.


For instance, the 2nd disc of Return of the King from the extended edition or LOTR is 35gb with the uncompressed video, DTS-HD MA audio, and English subs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audit13 /forum/post/20785781


For instance, the 2nd disc of Return of the King from the extended edition or LOTR is 35gb with the uncompressed video, DTS-HD MA audio, and English subs.

I guarantee you the video is NOT uncompressed if the whole file is only 35GB. It is just not compressed as much as it might be for those who are willing to sacrifice video quality for an even smaller file size.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erik71 /forum/post/20786165


I guarantee you the video is NOT uncompressed if the whole file is only 35GB. It is just not compressed as much as it might be for those who are willing to sacrifice video quality for an even smaller file size.

I'm not sure what you mean by not compressed. The 35gb file is the video and DTS-HD MA from disc 2 of a 2 disc set for the EE of Return of the King.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erik71 /forum/post/20789563


Uncompressed means just that -- uncompressed video. For 1080p at 24fps, that would be about 150MB/sec, which is about 500GB/hour.

I see. I was referring to the fact that the video and HD audio portion of the actual BR occupied 35gb. I didn't realize you were referring to the codec used to encode the video.
 

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Video on Blu-Ray is encoded/compressed with encoders such as h264 or vc-1. Bit-rates in the 20-40mb/s are used to retain great quality with file sizes in the 25-40GB. When people re-encode to reduce the file size they still use the same, very efficient, h264 encoder, they just reduce the bit-rate down to 8-15mb/s thus reducing file sizes into the commonly seen 8-15GBs MKVs.


Back to the OP question. While you can do it, it is not a good idea in my opinion. Lossless audio tracks can be has high as 6GB for a two hour movie. That would leave you with very little space left for the video portion.
 
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