AVS Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I may be totally nuts but I bought some monoprice HDMI cables at various lengths. (2, 3, 4 ft)


Is it just me or are these cables incredibly stiff? I was running them and I felt like they were putting tension on the inputs because they did not want to bend or flex very easily compared to other cables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by pitbull30 /forum/post/18200814


I may be totally nuts but I bought some monoprice HDMI cables at various lengths. (2, 3, 4 ft)


Is it just me or are these cables incredibly stiff? I was running them and I felt like they were putting tension on the inputs because they did not want to bend or flex very easily compared to other cables.


After reading the corresponding post, I am wondering whether the stiffness is leading to a more serious problem. Have a Toshiba 42ZV650U and blu-ray player and am using HDMI ports. Have hi-speed cables that I ordered from monoprice.com.


Sometimes when starting the blu-ray player, I get static and flicker and it won't allow DVD to start or go to menu. I think the HDMI cable connecting the blu-ray to the TV is to be blame - specifically, the port on the TV. This is because then if I toggle the HDMI (usually when I toggle it up so it is more straight) I can eventually get it to work and successfully get a clean screen and the blu-ray menu comes up successfully.


Does anyone else have a problem with HDMI cables and their tendency to droop and - thus - have static and flicker? What solution would you have for trying to keep a straightened HDMI cable (into the port), or would you simply go to a component cable? However, if you go to component cable, you would lose upscaling ability on the DVD player!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,755 Posts
What is the wire gauge of your cables?


The stiffness depends upon the wire gauge. High speed cables generally use a lower gauge (larger and stiffer) wire. To minimize the stress on the connectors you might use a smaller wire gauge, port saver cable such as this from Monoprice. Unless you are operating at the maximum cable length, it will have no effect on your displayed signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My cables were either 24 or 28 gauge in lengths of 2, 3 , 4 ft. My intention was to use them to jump from one component to another of course with the shortest leftover cable as possible to keep it neat and clean.


Well my problem with the cables was they dont bend or twist easily at all. My components are all side by side pretty much in an entertainment center. When running the cables I had to be pretty tough with them to twist them to match up with the inputs which was the first issue. It was also noted that if you push the cable flat the inputs were opposite. (one right side up-one upside down) therefore I would have to twist it to plug it into the next component. That sounds petty but these cables are really stiff.


Then after they were connected I would have to push the entertainment center back to the wall which would then "crunch" the cable putting more stress on the input. Im not talking about pushing it so far back that it hits the input. I just mean crunching the leftover cable. After just hooking them up there was no way I was going to push my enetertainment center to the wall.


These cables do not lay, guide through cable runs or bend easily. I chose not to use them. I went to fry's electronics and bought some other cables. It was a few dollars more, but way easier to connect, bend, run etc. If you plan on using cable guides to hide your cables the monoprice cables might not be the way to go. These cables are going back or will be given away to a friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,755 Posts
Monoprice also has right angle adapters (near bottom of page) that can reduce stress on the connector from the cable.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top