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The following appears on the packaging of Monster Cable DVI 400:


High bandwidth all digital video interface with gas injected dielectric for highest-quality HDTV picture.


More accurate color rendition.

Excellent rejection of RFI and EMI.

Optimum high-bandwidth DVI bitstream transfer.

Support 720p and 1080i HDTV standards.


If you want the best HDTV picture you need a digital video connection. Whether you're watching the ballgame or an action-packed movie in high-definition, without question, the picture quality is stunning. It could be better, though. For high-definition all digital video to look its best, data must be transferred from your set-top box or DVD player to your HD display in pure digital form. Unfortunately, this can't occur with analog video cable. Even high-resolution component video is still an analog connection!


In order for component video, or any other analog cable to do its job, your HDTV tuner, DVD player or other digital source must convert video from the Digital domain to the analog, then back to digital. This conversion process can cause high frequency attenuation, and loss of resolution and detail.


Introducing monster DVI 400: the highest-quality all digital video interface. Monster DVI 400 is a pure digital high-bandwidth video interface. What you see on your screen is exactly what was digitally transmitted. DVI 400 is designed to support the high bandwidth the man from your set-top box to the HDTV display.


DVI 400 supports up to 24-bit digital RGB data behind each pixel for the highest quality image. You'll enjoy a razor-sharp picture with incredible detail and vibrant, natural colors, even if you're forced to use long cable runs.


Get monster DVI 400 for HDTV and see what you've been missing. You paid a lot extra to enjoy the benefits of digital source material (DVD/HDTV) and a digital display device (plasma/high definition). Why limit the performance of these cutting edge technologies by connecting them with less than the highest-quality digital interface? Monster DVI 400 helps you get all the performance you paid for!


Monster's ultra low loss DVI design. Ordinary DVI cables features small gauge conductors promoting signal loss. Monster's larger gauge cable construction optimizes data transfer, ensuring maximum data bandwidth and highest-quality HDTV image, even over long cable runs.




The above was quoted verbatim using voice recognition software. Inaccuracies if any were introduced during the transcription.
 

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I can see the logic and theory to DVI, but my eyes (and my wife's eyes) can't see it. In the bedroom, we have a simple setup: Sony SAT HD200 STB feeding into a Sony 34XBR800 TV. That's it. No AVR or anything else. Just the STB and the TV. We have been watching on a component video connection for a long time. About 5 days ago, I switched it to DVI, since both the STB and TV have DVI connections. No special cable. Just the DVI cable that came with.


Neither of us can see any difference. Not in the OTA HD channels, not in the HD channels on DirecTV, not on the SD channels from DirecTV or the OTA SD channels. Maybe on a larger TV?


Dennis
 

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you won't see much on 34" TV . Every connection will look good . But when you go 100" + , its another story

Quote:
Originally posted by DennisR
I can see the logic and theory to DVI, but my eyes (and my wife's eyes) can't see it. In the bedroom, we have a simple setup: Sony SAT HD200 STB feeding into a Sony 34XBR800 TV. That's it. No AVR or anything else. Just the STB and the TV. We have been watching on a component video connection for a long time. About 5 days ago, I switched it to DVI, since both the STB and TV have DVI connections. No special cable. Just the DVI cable that came with.


Neither of us can see any difference. Not in the OTA HD channels, not in the HD channels on DirecTV, not on the SD channels from DirecTV or the OTA SD channels. Maybe on a larger TV?


Dennis
 

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Actually, if the STB (or other source) has decent component outputs, and your component cables are not stretching for dozens of feet, I doubt you're going to see much difference between component vs. DVI. In addition, it also depends on how DVI is implemented on both sides: I know the Sony GWII converts DVI to analog and has it follow the analog (ie. component) path from there on out. Result is that component and DVI look very similar on that platform. That's not necessarily a bad thing, both look very, very good.


DVI is no magic bullet, but eventually it'll help keeping a digital (DVD/cable/sat) signal digital from source to display, avoiding the shortcomings of analog.


-Rob-
 

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If I understand this cable correctly, it is purely digital DVI-DVI. If so then:


1) I will not argue with Monster that they may have the best quality DVI cable.


2) The real question is do you need on of this high a quality (and presumably high price and profit margin)?


A digital signal generally works or it does not. If a cheaper, less well-made cable works, all the extra quality in the Monster product will not give you any improvement in picture (the opposite usually applies in the analog world where Monster made their name).


For comparison, look at the LAN world where 100 Mbps signals are carried on Cat 5 twisted pair wire and 1 Gbps signals are carried on a single 4-pair Cat 5e cable.


There are definitely factors like connector plating where cheaper connectors might degrade faster than the Monster product. However, unlikely in the normal indoor Theater environment.


My recommendation wold be to choose a modest cable. If you have problems, return it and get the expensive variety. Most times you will not need to bother.


Just my opinion after 20+ years in electronics and communications.
 

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Wundermac,

What I meant with 'analog' in my post is that when the digital DVI signal comes into the Sony GWII it's converted back to analog early on in the processing path. From there it follows the same path as component in. The DVI interface itself is digital.


In the case of DVI it's not exactly a matter of "it works or it doesn't". In their infinite wisdom (read: "stupidity") the people that defined the digital part of the DVI standard did not include any error detection nor correction. People have reported problems with DVI cables resulting in degraded picture quality (but still a picture). The effect can be subtle or obvious. However, for short runs (3 meters and less) it seems a cheap cable works just as well as an expensive one.


-Rob-
 

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Hi Rop,


Thanks for the clarification. Still makes me go Hmmm......


If the DVI is truely digital (forget the conversion downstream) then the problem is unlikely to be lack of error detection and correction. More likely, the digital signal is being attenuated or distorted in some way (jitter, crosstalk etc.) that causes inaccurate recovery of the signal.


Do you know know the interface is clocked? In fact can you (or anyone) point me at a source for the spec itself? A carefull reading should reveal how these problems can arise.


Thanks in advance
 

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Wundermac, I sent you a PM but haven't heard back. People don't always check their messages, so let me just post:


Drop me a PM with your E-mail address and I'll be happy to send you the DVI standard document. It has the details on the protocol and signals used. It's actually one of the simpler protocols. Problems arise when the cable picks up noise to a point where it gets close to the logical '1' level so the detectors pick it up. The other part is that for higher clock rates there probably is quite a bit of attenuation of the real signal. Even if that's digital, signal strengths may either get close to noise levels or to where the detector no longer can reliably decode them.


-Rob-
 
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