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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wasn't sure where to put this but anyway my question is rather simple.


Does anyone here own a Monster HTS 2600 and have had any problems with it or has anyone heard of it having any problems. By problems I mean failure to provide basic power to components.


An installer I spoke to said he had about 26 that had failed and told me to keep away. Has anyone heard about this? Thanks for any input.


Morris
 

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Morris,


I picked up a Monster HTS 2600 about a month ago - a floor model that the dealer needed to sell off. Thus far, I have had no problems with the unit.


Dave
 

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I just installed a 2600 on my system last night, and for the skeptic that I am, I actually saw and heard improvements.

The first thing I noticed was the SAT feed. The picture is better! I don't really know why, but if I plug it directly into the TV, the picture isn't as "crisp" as when I route it thru the 2600.

The bass is also tighter, not even a hint of the boom I could hear in the past.



One thing about the 2600 that struck me as either wrong or stupid is the remote power on/off.

Let me explain, in the manual they tell you to plug the Reciever into the REC "switched" outlet. OK, so the denon gets connected to the REC outlet.

The they say plug the remote power wire from the 2600 to a swtiched outlet on the receiver, this way the 2600 will go ON and OFF with the receiver. OK.

Hmmm, the REC outlet is switched. so when the 2600 is OFF the receiver is dead!!! IE not listening for IR. how is that supposed to work?

Am I crazy? I had to connect the denon to an unswitched outlet to make this work.


Cheers
 

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so wait, reapur-- the 2600 gives power to the receiver, and then when you turn off the receiver, the 2600 turns off as well? but if you want to turn on the receiver, you have to turn on the 2600 first?


how else should it work? why would you want to turn of the 2600? isn't it nothing more than a glorified power strip?


I'm skeptical of these kinds of things. I guess if you've seen some improvement, then it's the right thing. But what would happen if you had a UPS in there instead? I realize the UPS doesn't have coax protection or the like, but I wonder... I use a UPS for my system, mainly to protect against surges, and it seems to do fine for a fraction of the price.
 

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good point. I was just confused because the manual indicated that there some remote turn on and off. You're right tho. I'm just gonna keep it on becuase it doen't seem to get too warm so no biggie.


I read somewhere that a PC UPS can't provide enough continous current to the rec to work effeciently, but hopefully someone knows better.
 

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I've had the HTS 2600 for quite some time now, and to be honest I'm not sure if it made a difference since I hooked it up with a bunch of new equipment altogether. However, if anything, atleast you have peace of mind that your gear is protected under some $350,000 by Monster Cable. As for the switching or all that, all I do is just leave the unit on. It says in the manual that it's perfectly OK to do that.
 

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I've had my 2600 hooked up for a couple of months now. I've noticed an improvement in my video, but I've recently changed my audio components around and couldn't give an honest assessment of any improvement in that area.


As far as the problems you mentioned.......I bought mine brand new and have not witnessed any such issues.
 

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Hey,


I don't have a 2600, rather, a 3500, but have loved my unit. It does seem to give a better picture from my cable feed (the motorola broadband drop amp that I hooked up with it does a great job of both increasing the quality of my cable channels and making my cable modem faster as well).


I have to say I was skeptical at first as well, but after I have seen my system with and without it, and with the added peace of mind knowing that if somehow power damages anything I am covered, I am a true believer.


Tracer:


As far as the UPS thing goes, the power centers are more than glorified power strips. Look at any true high end audio or video equipment and you will see that a lot of design and technology goes into a high grade power supply, and since audio and video equipment is basically just taking electricity from the wall and turning it into picture and sound, it makes sense that the picture and sound would be cleaner if the electricity going in is cleaner. A powerstrip doesn't clean power, just copies it over to more outlets. I think the reason that you shouldn't use a UPS is that a UPS would be overwhelmed by the current draw from a home theatre. Maybe if you had like a mega-server room industrial strength UPS.... but then that would cost more than the 2600 :).
 

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nullomodo:


really? I can get a really, really beefy UPS for the price of a 2600.


like this one:
http://www.apcc.com/resource/include...e_sku=SU700NET

it does line conditioning, and seems like it can handle a pretty large draw.


several of the statistics mentioned on the APCC site, like output capacity, voltage, waveform type, etc, are missing from the monster cable description of the 2600, which apparently measures things in joules and the surge guarantee. It's kinda hard to compare the two.
 

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Yep hard to compare. If the UPS does line conditioning, then it should have some of the same benefits as an audio power conditioner, with the added feature of the battery reserve for brownout/blackouts...


There may be different grades of line conditioning however, so i guess its a research topic to determine which is better :)


And the servers that APCs are normally designed for, draw plenty of power, i dont think there is an issue with the APC not being able to handle the load of audio equipment.You just need to get the appropiate sized UPS for the load.


Also, I would think that APC has ALOT more experience in power conditioning than MONSTER.
 

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I've had two 2600s blow on me. I purchased it at Circuit City. First one blew during an extremely loud viewing of Fast And The Furious. I had my whole system plugged into it - 53" Widescreen, 5 X 165 Amplifier, Sunfire Sig. Subwoofer + Pre Amp, DVD, VCR, Laser Disc. Took it back to Circuit City told them what happened and they replaced it ( it was only 30 days old ). With the replacement I reduced the load - I removed the TV and SUB from the 2600. It lasted a lot longer but eventually the switched outlets did go bad on me - not sure what happened there. I moved the 2600 up to my bedroom - and purchased a Monster Power 7200. It has a higher power rating - I have had my entire system plugged into it for 4 months now without a problem. Maybe I just ended up with two bad 2600s but IMO the design needs some work - just not reliable for me.
 

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maybe this could help me understand the point-- is there a direct correspondance to the wattage of the amp/receiver and the wattage of the power draw? as in, if I have a 7x100 receiver at 8 ohm impedance, does that mean that the power supply draws 700 watts of power, so I'd need a UPS that's rated for 700 watts for the receiver alone? If they do not correspond, is there some conversion that can be done?


It's the lack of any kind of actual electrical/power information on the monster site that disturbs me. Maybe it's the geek in me, but it's hard to come up with a correspondance to a UPS that can run 4 monitors and 4 computers off of it without complaining to the equivalent low-end "power cleaner" offered by monster.
 

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TracerBullet,


The power consumption of your receiver should be listed in its specs somewhere. What is lost in the circuitry is different for all receivers.


Here's what is listed for the HK AVR 525, a 70 x 7 rated receiver - 120W @ idle,

1,040W @ rated output (7 channels driven)
 

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how does a receiver that has 490 combined wattage somehow double that amount in power draw? that seems _tremendously_ inefficient to me.


I know that UPSs complain when the source that they are hooked up to is drawing more power than they can handle. If I plug a bunch of 21 inch monitors into a UPS, it beeps like crazy to let you know that you're drawing way too much power for the unit to handle. I have a pioneer 45tx (just out of the package, thanks docdvd!), and it's sitting on a ups with a computer and a pj. The UPS is rated for a 12 amp current and 350 watts. I know my computer power supply is about 350 watts alone, and the manual sez that the pioneer sucks 600 watts.


so am I overloading my UPS, and it's not complaining? or is there some correspondance to wattage and amperage that should be made here?


wish I'd done better in physics :)
 

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Tracer,


Remember, the 350 watts and 600 watts are probably maximums...not minimums. So if you were to turn the volume up on the receiver, and max out the components in your PC, you may be looking at 950 watts.
 

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Tracer the UPS in your can only handle 450w while the 2600 can handle 1850w so you'd have to buy 4 UPS. The 2600 isn't a UPS so you can't really compare them.


Daniel Smith
 

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Tracer you notice a reoccuring theme in both of these threads everyone noticed a video improvement so it must be doing something.


Daniel Smith
 

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DanielSmi:

so the model number corresponds to the wattage that the system can withstand? Interesting. I hadn't seen that correlation on the monster website.


I've also noticed that everyone who owns one of these things is raving about it. However, I'm too much of a scientist (read: skeptic) to just accept it. Therefore, I propose a test.


I propose that, given the exact same home theater, we use one of three systems for power: a monster line conditioner, an equivalently-priced UPS, and nothing.


I will test two display devices, an lcd projector and a 27 inch monitor (since I happen to have those things).


The sound system is a pioneer 45tx with B&W speakers.


The source material will be fed from a computer, dvd player, or vcr to the display device. The computer will use a regular desktop, an HD feed from an AccessDTV card, and TheaterTek as it's sources. (again, since that's what I have and typically use.)


The results will be generated as follows:

for each source and each display device, I will record via digital camera (I have an elph s200) the picture quality. That will let us know whether or not picture is improved, and whether it is display device specific. I will also record audio feeds, but only once, since the audio system isn't changing.


So, five sources times 2 display devices is 10 tests, and I should probably use different sources (ie, different dvd's, different channels, etc), so that no one piece of source material corrupts the test. Let's say 3 tests, so 30 overall tests for video, 15 for audio for each power supply-- 90 overall tests.


And then, I'll post the results, but I won't tell you which is which. Instead, I'll ask which is best/medium/crap of the set of three power supplies. If your results are consistently wandering all over the place (ie, monster is best in one test, worst in another test), that would mean that the monster system isn't that useful. If your results are that you think the monster picture is the best for some applications and not others (which is why there are three tests there, you might think monster is best for some dvd's and not others, or that monster is best for dvd's period but not vcrs), then you can decide if that is an application that's interesting to you. If you choose the monster to be entirely superior in all tests, then it's right for you.


Of course, if you consistently choose either the monster or the UPS to be best/medium and regular power to be consistently the worst, then we can conclude that the monster system is no different than a UPS, but doesn't offer the nicety of being able to shut down in the event of a power loss.


So, that's my proposal. To do it, I'm going to need a monster power supply, an equivalently priced UPS (let's say from NewEgg.com, since they have pretty good prices and are a good reseller), a microphone, and web space to publish the results. I'll return the equipment when I'm done, and I live in the LA area, so I can just pick it up from anyone and avoid the whole shipping hassle if someone's in the area.


Any takers?
 
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