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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen a ton of sites that have/sell drapes that close from side to side, but are there any that come from the top down, like my (soon to be) projector screen.
 

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 www.kathiejohnson.com - her husband is a member of this forum - maybe they can help. Also Dennis Erskine has a lot of sources. Anyone else?


Pam
 

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BTX sells a motorized remote control device that can be used for either Austrian or Roman type shades. I rather doubt Austrian would work very well in a blackout lined situation, perhaps PamW knows. Roman would. Your local drapery dealer would purchase the unit, which is mounted on a 1X4 board and construct the shade in a normal fashion. It would simply be raised and lowered by the motors rolling the strings up onto reels rather than pulling strings on the side as you would a manual Roman. The two negatives are that it requires 110v at the shade and it can get spendy. It's the B9 Roman on this page:
http://btxinc.com/pages/prodtech.htm


A better solution for a simpler and more economical approach would be to use the HunterDouglas PowerRise Honeycomb Duette Blackout shade. This is remote control, can have batteries in the headrail, a battery pack on the wall, or a wall cube supplying the power. HunterDouglas also has an X-10 triggered IR blaster that will lower all the shades at once. I am using one to lower a couple of PowerRise shades each day to block sunshine fading, triggered by my Ocelot home automation system, and it works very well.


I really don't know of any other way to get vertical lift than discussed above. In stage work, and in one home theater I saw a picture of, they lift the entire drapery vertically, but that means into the room above. Most homes will not accomodate that unless built from the ground up for that purpose.


This stuff all depends on budget. Some pretty cool things can be done, but each has it's price. In a normal cost conscious home theater setup, the HunterDouglas PowerRise Duette is about as extravagant as most get.


Is there a reason you need to go vertical? Perhaps we can help solve your problem with a bit more information on what the limitations are.


Deane
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is my issue.


I have one large window on the (left)side-middle of my room. I also have about half of the rear of the room open to the entry way. And finally, I have an opening at the (right) side-rear of the room. The window is not that big a deal, options galore, however, the two openings are tuff to deal with.


My thought was to mount a roller above each opening that would drop a drape down to the floor, but be out of site when no movies are going.


See, I use the room for regular TV and sports viewing..I have three (soon to be four) tvs on the wall with a PJ screen that will cover them all for movies.


Make sense?
 

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A HunterDouglas Vertiglide would work for the large openings. It is a Honeycomb Duette turned on it's side, runs smoothly on a track. We sell dozens of them for patio sliding doors. I wouldn't bother motorizing them. Just slide them closed when you're watching a movie. When someone wants to leave the room or enter, they just manually slide it open enough to pass through.


It would then match nicely with a PowerRise Duette on your large window.


While they don't give these things away, they will be cheaper than anything you can motorize vertically, except a PowerRise, and the opening is too large for those. Locally, a Vertiglide runs about $700 for a large patio door.

http://www.hunterdouglas.com/duette_..._overview.html


Deane
 
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