AVS Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I would like everyones advice on wall mounting speakers without a stud. The speakers will be installed in a typical 5.1 setup, ie fronts, center and surrounds. Sub will go on the floor. The problem is there are not studs in the exact location I want to hang them. Some details on the speakers:


they are Definitive Procinema 800.


the fronts / surrounds are 4 lbs a piece


the center is 6 lbs.


Has anyone mounted speakers that heavy without a stud? Is it a bad idea?


Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Yamaha TSR700 (Bose 301II’s), DirecTV 4K, Apple TV 4K, Philips 4K BDP, LG 75” Nanocell
Joined
·
594 Posts
(the late)Billy Mays to the rescue!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
6 lbs...no problem at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
I just mounted some height speakers. Unfortunately I used crappy kind of drywall plug that was to rounded and ended up spinning in the hole. I ended up cutting out a 4 or 5 inch section of the drywall, and screwed in a cross piece of 2x4 between the 2 studs and placed a new piece of drywall back over.


I was able to do over 3 nights, (mudding, sanding, priming painting...) at about 90 minutes in total.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,126 Posts
+1, directly into drywall, np


drywall screws would probably work fine


but I REALLY like THESE drywall anchors, available at Home Depot




You need to know the drywall thickness


Edit - the device is called a molly bolt, I like the one with the pointed tip




Edit #2 - comparison of drywall anchors:

http://www.dannylipford.com/testing-...cture-hangers/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Install speakers in plasterboard where there is no stud.

Hey Steve, this is exactly what i want to do but not sure where to start on what to search in YouTube to find a tutorial. Can you help? thankyou


I just mounted some height speakers. Unfortunately I used crappy kind of drywall plug that was to rounded and ended up spinning in the hole. I ended up cutting out a 4 or 5 inch section of the drywall, and screwed in a cross piece of 2x4 between the 2 studs and placed a new piece of drywall back over.

I was able to do over 3 nights, (mudding, sanding, priming painting...) at about 90 minutes in total.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Hey Steve, this is exactly what i want to do but not sure where to start on what to search in YouTube to find a tutorial. Can you help? thankyou



Hey kevin123. I'll do what I can.



I couldn't find any tutorials either.



Mark the wall exactly where you want the mounting screw to go. (we will assume it is not directly over a stud and that you are in between 2 studs.)


You are going to cut a hole. It will need to be about 5 to 6 inches high so you have room to handle it piece of wood and screw it into place. So your top cut will be about 3 inches above our mark, and your bottom cut will be about 3 inches below.



Start with the top cut (or bottom, doesn't matter). Start in the same center line as your mark. With a drywall knife, cut to the right.... keep going until you hit a stud. Then cut about a half inch further so that your piece of drywall will overlap the studs a little. This will help you a lot when you put the drywall back in place.


*Don't ram your saw all the way in. Just use the tip, no more than an inch deep in case there are any wires in there. (Insert penis jokes here) You do not want to cut or nick a live electrical wire.



Then go back to the starting point and continue along the same cut to the left until you hit a stud on the left side. Once again... cut a half inch past that first edge of the stud so your drywall piece will over lap the stud face a little on each side.



Do the same for the bottom line.


Then make your vertical drywall cuts to complete your rectangle and pop your piece of drywall out. Your rectangle should be somewhere around 16" x 6" depending on how far apart your studs are in the wall.



Measure your height for your screw again and mark it on each stud... you want to make sure the piece you a adding will be where you want it.



Measure the space between the two studs and cut a piece of 2x4 to fit. Before you put it in place, drill a 45 degree pilot hole in each end of the 2x4 on the side that will face out. (You can use the wide face of the 2x4 so you will have more surface area to screw into. You may want 2 pilot holes on each end if you do this.) Use a 2" or 2.5" screw to screw it into the studs. You can start the screws in the pilot holes so you don't have to fiddle with them while you are trying to hold the wood in place. (Don't drop it into the wall :)



Hold it in place, try and keep it flush, (it's okay if the piece is a little recessed, but its a pain the ass if it is a little proud) then screw in the one side.Counter sink the screw so that it doesn't stick out. Then do the other side also making sure it is flush.


Make sense? If not, fire me another question.


Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
thankyou

Wow MuaySteve,

Thanks heaps..... extremely well thought out and easy to understand.

cheers


Hey kevin123. I'll do what I can.



I couldn't find any tutorials either.



Mark the wall exactly where you want the mounting screw to go. (we will assume it is not directly over a stud and that you are in between 2 studs.)


You are going to cut a hole. It will need to be about 5 to 6 inches high so you have room to handle it piece of wood and screw it into place. So your top cut will be about 3 inches above our mark, and your bottom cut will be about 3 inches below.



Start with the top cut (or bottom, doesn't matter). Start in the same center line as your mark. With a drywall knife, cut to the right.... keep going until you hit a stud. Then cut about a half inch further so that your piece of drywall will overlap the studs a little. This will help you a lot when you put the drywall back in place.


*Don't ram your saw all the way in. Just use the tip, no more than an inch deep in case there are any wires in there. (Insert penis jokes here) You do not want to cut or nick a live electrical wire.



Then go back to the starting point and continue along the same cut to the left until you hit a stud on the left side. Once again... cut a half inch past that first edge of the stud so your drywall piece will over lap the stud face a little on each side.



Do the same for the bottom line.


Then make your vertical drywall cuts to complete your rectangle and pop your piece of drywall out. Your rectangle should be somewhere around 16" x 6" depending on how far apart your studs are in the wall.



Measure your height for your screw again and mark it on each stud... you want to make sure the piece you a adding will be where you want it.



Measure the space between the two studs and cut a piece of 2x4 to fit. Before you put it in place, drill a 45 degree pilot hole in each end of the 2x4 on the side that will face out. (You can use the wide face of the 2x4 so you will have more surface area to screw into. You may want 2 pilot holes on each end if you do this.) Use a 2" or 2.5" screw to screw it into the studs. You can start the screws in the pilot holes so you don't have to fiddle with them while you are trying to hold the wood in place. (Don't drop it into the wall :)



Hold it in place, try and keep it flush, (it's okay if the piece is a little recessed, but its a pain the ass if it is a little proud) then screw in the one side.Counter sink the screw so that it doesn't stick out. Then do the other side also making sure it is flush.


Make sense? If not, fire me another question.


Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
one more question

MuaySteve,

Just wondering.... did you reuse the drywall you cut out or did you cut a new piece?

thanks again


Hey kevin123. I'll do what I can.



I couldn't find any tutorials either.



Mark the wall exactly where you want the mounting screw to go. (we will assume it is not directly over a stud and that you are in between 2 studs.)


You are going to cut a hole. It will need to be about 5 to 6 inches high so you have room to handle it piece of wood and screw it into place. So your top cut will be about 3 inches above our mark, and your bottom cut will be about 3 inches below.



Start with the top cut (or bottom, doesn't matter). Start in the same center line as your mark. With a drywall knife, cut to the right.... keep going until you hit a stud. Then cut about a half inch further so that your piece of drywall will overlap the studs a little. This will help you a lot when you put the drywall back in place.


*Don't ram your saw all the way in. Just use the tip, no more than an inch deep in case there are any wires in there. (Insert penis jokes here) You do not want to cut or nick a live electrical wire.



Then go back to the starting point and continue along the same cut to the left until you hit a stud on the left side. Once again... cut a half inch past that first edge of the stud so your drywall piece will over lap the stud face a little on each side.



Do the same for the bottom line.


Then make your vertical drywall cuts to complete your rectangle and pop your piece of drywall out. Your rectangle should be somewhere around 16" x 6" depending on how far apart your studs are in the wall.



Measure your height for your screw again and mark it on each stud... you want to make sure the piece you a adding will be where you want it.



Measure the space between the two studs and cut a piece of 2x4 to fit. Before you put it in place, drill a 45 degree pilot hole in each end of the 2x4 on the side that will face out. (You can use the wide face of the 2x4 so you will have more surface area to screw into. You may want 2 pilot holes on each end if you do this.) Use a 2" or 2.5" screw to screw it into the studs. You can start the screws in the pilot holes so you don't have to fiddle with them while you are trying to hold the wood in place. (Don't drop it into the wall :)



Hold it in place, try and keep it flush, (it's okay if the piece is a little recessed, but its a pain the ass if it is a little proud) then screw in the one side.Counter sink the screw so that it doesn't stick out. Then do the other side also making sure it is flush.


Make sense? If not, fire me another question.


Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
MuaySteve,

Just wondering.... did you reuse the drywall you cut out or did you cut a new piece?

thanks again



Ideally you want to be able to throw the same piece back up and it should fit well, but if it breaks etc, use a new piece. You can buy small project pieces at the depot. I recommend mudding it without using drywall tape. The couple times I have used tape around patches it never goes well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,126 Posts
FWIW, I switched to Snap Togglers, for heavy duty drywall anchors.






Available from Lowes, Home Depot, and Amazon.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top