AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any MPEG-4 recorders or ways of recording MPEG-4 onto DVDs?


It would seem that since it has become a standard that MPEG-4 products would be showing up by now.


"While audio and video are at the core of the MPEG-4 specification, MPEG-4 can also support 3D objects, sprites, text and other media types.


MPEG-4 is designed to deliver DVD (MPEG-2) quality video at lower data rates and smaller file sizes. And the same folks who created the popular .mp3 file format — a.k.a. MPEG-1 layer III — developed the new Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) codec, providing much more efficient compression than MP3 with a quality rivaling that of uncompressed CD audio.


Like MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 previously did for CD-ROMs and DVDs, MPEG-4 promises to create interoperability for video delivered over the Internet and other distribution channels. MPEG-4 will play back on many different devices, from satellite television to wireless devices.


To ensure that different products that use MPEG-4 each implement the standard in the same way, Apple, together with the Cisco, IBM, Kasenna, Philips and Sun Microsystems, formed the Internet Streaming Media Alliance (ISMA). Other participants include AOL Time Warner, Dolby Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, National Semiconductor, Sony, and 25 other companies. The ISMA defines profiles that companies implement to ensure interoperability.


That means you can rest assured that the MPEG-4 media stream you create using one company’s product will run on another vendor’s player.


MPEG-4 provides an open playing field. As an open, industry standard, anyone can create an MPEG-4 player or encoder that will work with other manufacturer’s devices.


Media companies save time and resources by encoding material once for playback everywhere. No longer will content providers need to encode, host, and store media in multiple formats. Instead, a single format can reach a broad audience equipped with playback devices from not one, but a multitude of companies across a wide array of platforms. Finally, content creators have a format that will reach a global audience and will stand the test of time. While other formats and versions come and go, MPEG-4 will safeguard multimedia content for a secure future.


And of course, resources saved in encoding, hosting, and storing media can be better used to create a wider library of digital media, which benefits the entire Internet community."



So, by putting all this effort into converting my personal video and audio collections into another format, my effort would receive the greatest payoff and longevity by converting to a standard that operates on the widest possible number of device types supported by the greatest number of vendors using a single format (like MPEG-4) that accommodates many media types.


Why put a herculean effort into MPEG-2 when everything will likely be MPEG-4?


Or am I just impatient?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,700 Posts
Quote:
Are there any MPEG-4 recorders or ways of recording MPEG-4 onto DVDs?
The more appropriate question is: are there any stand alone, home theater quality mpeg-4 PLAYERS?


The fact is that most standalone players only support the DVD-Video standard (using an mpeg2 video stream and either Dolby Digital, LPCM, or MP2 audio) so that's the format most people will want to record to today. The Panasonic DMR-E100 DVD recorder supports MPEG-4 recording and playback via SD card only. There are some portable "personal media players" by Panasonic, Archos and others that support mpeg-4 video playback from flash memory cards or from a built-in hard drive. MPEG-2 based DVD-Video is somewhat entrenched now and there will be significant inertia from the consuming public against migrating to a new standard. Especially since Blockbuster et al are now acknowledging the fact that DVD is the preferred multimedia playback medium and are just now phasing out VHS tape.


Look for mpeg-4 to fill niche market in the personal media player, internet, and PC-based wireless multimedia playback arena in the meantime until eventual adoption of mpeg-4 vice mpeg-2 as the distribution format of choice for HD video via blu-ray laser disc media (with a capacity of 23 to 27 GB) in about 5 to 7 years.


Vic
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top