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One of the rooms in the basement I'm finishing has some duct work that runs below the joists, and would be a pain to drywall around. So, I'm considering a drop ceiling, but would like to avoid losing the 12"+ of ceiling height in the rest of the room. Basically, I'm wondering if it's possible to install a 2-level drop ceiling. Logistically, it doesn't seem like it would be all that difficult, I'm just not sure if they make anything to accomodate vertical ceiling tiles. Anyone know if I can do this?
 

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They don't actually make vertical ceiling tiles but boxing around something or stepping down is easy and very commen. Just build a frame out of grid parts. Use pop-rivets to hold the frame together. I have seen white pop-rivets but it's just as easy to paint raw ones with a small brush. Cut the tiles very accurately slightly oversize. This will "pinch" them place. Or if you can get to the back secure them with a few blobs of silicon caulk.
 

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I would check at a good ceiling goods supplier to see if grid work is made to facilitate the vertical panels. I know I have seen it done in commercial buildings and the pros would want a fast and easy way to do the job.

Jim Mc

"The Stargate"

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Album...&sp=1&vt=vpall
 

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I have a 2-level drop ceiling in my basement. The lower section runs from the front of the theater to about the middle of the room where a steel support beam runs parallel to the front wall. The beam is boxed in with dry wall, creating a vertical "wall" that rises and meets the begining of the higher section of ceiling tile. It looks great and actually helps create the feeling of two rooms - a theater in the front of the room and a bar in the back half.


I used Armstrong tile and grid, if thats helpful.
 

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Or you could build a trey or soffit out of wood and drywall around the ducting, and then do the drop ceiling in the upper part.
 
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