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Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering how one would go about increasing the number of surround sound speakers. For example, if I only have 5 outputs on the back of my reciever, but want 10 speakers (2 each for FL, FR, RL, RR, and Center) would I simply plug two speakers into each output, or is there something else that will branch and amplifiy the lines so no singal loss will occur?


Thanks in advance.


David


edit - okay, i may be stupid. perhaps i'm just looking for an amplifier with enough channels? If this is true are all 10+ channel amps of any qualtiy build over 1k?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes they are. As a secondary purpose they will be used for tv/movie viewing. However, their primary purpose is for conferences. There will also be microphones around the room, and the speakers will serve to distribute the sound around the room. For instance, if I'm in the back of the room I'll be able to hear somebody in the front. In that capacity they probably won't even be "_.1", but actually a mono channel split, however, as I said, they still need to have the capability to be "_.1".
 

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You always have the analog out from your DVD player (if it has a decoder). Ideally, moving past a 5.1 setup requires a pre/pro (audio video preamp processor) and multiple power amps, or a good 7-channel amp and other amps to get you your desired setup. I have seen 7-channel amps go for the price, I have not even seen 10-channel amps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Humm, perhaps I need to clairfity some. For arguments sake, let's just say that we are working with a 5.1 system here. Regardless of any external inputs (i.e., microphones), I want a 5.1 setup, but to have each of the surround speakers doubled. 2 Left Fronts, 2 Front Rights, etc. Well not the center channel, but you get the idea. Simply put, I'm working with a large room and want added coverage.
 

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Sounds like Sony's SDDS setup, a center, left center, left, right center and right www.sdds.com. You need around 20' to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No, I do not believe that SDDS is what I am looking for.


I want to utilize the 5.1 that we have going out of our reciever. However, I want to split/duplicate some, but not all of the channels.
 

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I think what you need are a few speaker selectors. These devices allow multiple speakers to be run from one input. If you put a 2-way selector on each channel you want to split, and select both speakers, you should be in business.


Rob
 

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I don't see why it would be a problem to connect the speakers in parallel to a single output on your amp/receiver. As long as your speakers are 8 ohm impedence and your amp/receiver can handle a 4 ohm load you should be fine. Just connect both positive wires from your speakers you want to connect to the positive terminal of your amp and both negative wires from your speakers to the negative terminal of your amp. The only difference is you are lowering the impedence your amp sees with each speaker you add in parallel.


-Shawn
 

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Unless you got a really big room and need to fill out the soundfield for a variety of seating positions, I don't see the point of doubling up on the surround speakers. If you're going to double the speakers, you introduce all kinds of time domain problems and room interactions that can destroy your imaging and make the overall sound harsh if the speakers aren't placed properly.


As for how to actually do something like this, all you really need is to use a receiver with all channel preouts and plug in a multichannel amplifier. Use the receiver for the main and surround channels, and then use the outboard amps for the doubled up surround speakers. I would not try wiring them in parallel, since even with 8 ohm speakers, the impedance on most speakers dips well below that at some frequencies. And most receivers that claim to handle 4 ohm speakers, are not really designed to handle five or seven speakers with that low an impedance simultaneously.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the feedback guys.


I really don't think I want to go with doubling up the connections directly to the reciever. I'm not comfortable with that. Besides, I tried splicing two wires together so I could get a speaker to go a little further and the reciever kept cutting off, giving me an error saying "check wiring".


I'll look into multichannel amps and see how that will work out. However, I will keep in mind the potential issues your raised Woochifer, though I'm not sure how much my boss will be concerned with that. If worse comes to worse, we may simply end up with a single _.1 setup in a reallly big room.


David
 

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I'm not very familiar with most setups but my own. I thought about 4 surround speakers only (splitting the SL and SR not touching the fronts at all). I run HK520 main and an HK PA2000. If I use the preout on the HK520, the amp for that channel is cut out and defaults to the amp I am powering.


Now, the HK PA2000, in addition to the speakers you connect and the pre-in RCA connector from the HK 520, also has a Pre Out, which the manual says you can "Daisy Chain" to other amps to spread the same sound over other speakers through other amps. I hope this makes sense?


If not, in other words, I can not only feed two surrounds with my HK PA2000, but the amp can pass the same signal to another HK PA2000, with another set of surround speakers hooked in.


You can get the HK PA2000 for $200 to $250 new, less used I am sure, if this will fit your bill.


Just a thought, good luck!
 
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